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Installation, Operation, & Maintenance - AAON …

RN SERIES Horizontal Packaged Rooftop Units, Heat Pumps, & Outdoor Air Handling Units Installation, Operation, & Maintenance o Do not …

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Text of Installation, Operation, & Maintenance - AAON …

RN SERIESHorizontal Packaged Rooftop Units, Heat Pumps, & Outdoor Air Handling Units Installation, Operation, & Maintenance oDo not store gasoline or other flammable vapors and liquids in the vicinity of this or any other appliance oWHAT TO DO IF YOU SMELL GAS Do not try to light any appliance. Do not touch any electrical switch; do not use any phone in your building. Leave the building immediately. Immediately call your gas supplier from a phone remote from the building. Follow the gas supplier s instructions. If you cannot reach your gas supplier, call the fire department. oStartup and service must be performed by a Factory Trained Service Technician. WARNING FIRE OR EXPLOSION HAZARD Failure to follow safety warnings exactly could result in serious injury, death or property damage. Be sure to read and understand the installation, operation, and service instructions in this manual. Improper installation, adjustment, alteration, service, or maintenance can cause serious injury, death, or property damage. A copy of this IOM should be kept with the unit. WARNING 3 Table of Contents Safety ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ ...................... 8 RN Series Feature String Nomenclature ........................................ ........................................ ....... 13 General Information ........................................ ........................................ ...................................... 24 Codes and Ordinances ........................................ ........................................ .............................. 24 Receiving Unit ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ .. 25 Packaged Direct Expansion (DX) Units ........................................ ........................................ ... 26 Gas or Electric Heating ........................................ ........................................ ............................. 27 Wiring Diagrams ........................................ ........................................ ....................................... 28 Condensate Drain Pan ........................................ ........................................ ............................... 28 28 Locating Units ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ ... 28 Setting the Curb ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ 29 Forklifting the Unit (11, 13 and 16-30 ton) ........................................ ...................................... 31 Lifting the Unit ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ . 31 Duct Connection ........................................ ........................................ ....................................... 33 Outside Air Rain Hood ........................................ ........................................ ............................. 35 Metal Mesh Filters (11, 13 and 16-30 ton) ........................................ ....................................... 36 Electrical ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ ........... 36 Thermostat Control Wiring ........................................ ........................................ ................... 38 Gas Heating ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ ....... 39 Piping Sizing Examples ........................................ ........................................ ........................ 41 Inlet and Manifold Pressures ........................................ ........................................ ................ 41 Gas Pressure Regulator & Overpressure Protection Device ........................................ ......... 41 Piping Supports ........................................ ........................................ ..................................... 41 Additional Gas Piping Considerations ........................................ ........................................ .. 42 Leak Testing ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ .. 43 Refrigerant-to-Water Heat Exchanger ........................................ ........................................ ...... 43 Water-Source Heat Pump Applications ........................................ ........................................ 43 Open Loop Applications ........................................ ........................................ ....................... 44 Freezing Water in the Heat Exchanger ........................................ ........................................ . 45 Water Piping ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ . 45 Condensate Drain Piping ........................................ ........................................ .......................... 48 Draw-Through Coils ........................................ ........................................ ................................. 49 Heating Coils ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ .... 50 Chilled Water Coil ........................................ ........................................ .................................... 50 Electric Preheat ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ . 51 Status Display Screens ........................................ ........................................ .......................... 51 System Setting Screens ........................................ ........................................ ......................... 52 LED Flash Alarm Codes ........................................ ........................................ ....................... 54 Operation ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ ....... 54 Energy Recovery Units ........................................ ........................................ ............................. 55 Startup ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ ................... 63 Supply Fans ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ ....... 63 Power Return Axial Flow Fans (16-25 and 30 tons) ........................................ ........................ 65 Filters ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ ................ 67 4 Adjusting Refrigerant Charge ........................................ ........................................ ................... 68 Checking Liquid Sub-Cooling ........................................ ........................................ .............. 68 Checking Evaporator Superheat ........................................ ........................................ ........... 68 Adjusting Sub-cooling and Superheat 69 Gas Heater Instructions ........................................ ........................................ ............................. 71 Condenser Fan Electronically Commutated Motor (ECM) Startup ........................................ . 72 VFD Controlled Condenser Fan Startup ........................................ ........................................ ... 73 Adjustable Fan Cycling Switch Procedure ........................................ ....................................... 74 76 Thermostat Operation ........................................ ........................................ ............................... 76 Packaged DX Cooling Operation and Control ........................................ ................................. 77 Gas Heater Operation ........................................ ........................................ ................................ 77 Electric Heating Operation ........................................ ........................................ ....................... 77 Steam or Hot Water Preheating and Heating Operation ........................................ ................... 77 Modulating Electric Preheat ........................................ ........................................ ..................... 77 Chilled Water or Non-Compressorized DX Cooling Operation ........................................ ....... 77 Maintenance ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ .......... 78 Gas Heating ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ ....... 78 Gas Heat Exchanger Removal ........................................ ........................................ .................. 79 DX Cooling ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ ....... 79 Condenser Fans (6-25 and 30 ton) ........................................ ........................................ ............ 79 Condensate Drain Pans ........................................ ........................................ ............................. 80 Evaporator Coil (6-25 and 30 ton) ........................................ ........................................ ............ 81 Brazed Plate Heat Exchanger Cleaning ........................................ ........................................ .... 82 E-Coated Coil Cleaning ........................................ ........................................ ............................ 82 Microchannel Coil Cleaning ........................................ ........................................ ..................... 83 Supply Fans ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ ....... 86 Phase and Brownout Protection Module ........................................ ........................................ .. 87 Variable Capacity Compressor Controller ........................................ ........................................ 89 Filter Replacement ........................................ ........................................ .................................... 90 Filter Information ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ .. 91 Replacement Parts ........................................ ........................................ ..................................... 92 Appendix A - Heat Exchanger Corrosion Resistance ........................................ ........................... 93 Appendix B - Thermistor Temperature vs. Resistance Values ........................................ ............. 95 RN Series Startup Form ........................................ ........................................ ................................ 96 Maintenance Log ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ 100 V76270 Rev. A 160425 5 Index of Tables and Figures Tables: Table 1 - Electric and Gas Heating Capacities ........................................ ..................................... 28 Table 2 - C Cabinet Unit Clearances ........................................ ........................................ ............ 29 Table 3 - Control Wiring ........................................ ........................................ ............................... 39 Table 4 -11, 13, 16-25 and 30 ton ........................................ ........................................ ................. 39 Table 5 - Natural Gas (ft3/hr) Maximum Piping Capacities ........................................ ................. 40 Table 6 - Propane (kBtu/hr) Maximum Piping Capacities ........................................ ................... 40 Table 7 - Gas Piping Supports ........................................ ........................................ ...................... 41 Table 8 - Glycol Freezing Points ........................................ ........................................ .................. 45 Table 9 - Standard Brazed Plate Heat Exchanger Water Connections ........................................ . 46 Table 10 - SMO 254 Brazed Plate Heat Exchanger Water Connections ...................................... 46 Table 11 - Draw-Through Drain Trap Dimensions ........................................ .............................. 49 Table 12 - Steam Coil Connection Sizes ........................................ ........................................ ...... 50 Table 13 - Hot Water Coil Connection Sizes ........................................ ........................................ 50 Table 14 - Chilled Water Coil Connection Sizes ........................................ .................................. 50 Table 15 - Stages of Electric Preheat ........................................ ........................................ ............ 53 Table 16 - Plenum Fan Set Screw Specifications ........................................ ................................. 64 Table 17 - Pin Location ........................................ ........................................ ................................. 67 Table 18 - Pin Groove 67 Table 19 - Acceptable Refrigeration ........................................ ........................................ ............. 69 Table 20 - R-410A Refrigerant Temperature-Pressure Chart ........................................ ............... 70 Table 21 - ECM Condenser Fan Cycling Options ........................................ ................................ 72 Table 22 - Demand Signal vs. Compressor Capacity Modulation ........................................ ........ 89 Table 23 - RN Series 11, 13, 16-25 and 30 ton Pre Filters ........................................ ................... 91 Table 24 - RN Series 11, 13, 16-25 and 30 ton Unit Filters ........................................ ................. 91 Table 25 - RN Series 11, 13, 16-25 and 30 ton Energy Recovery Wheel Filters ......................... 91 Table 26 - RN Series 11, 13, 16-25 and 30 ton Final Filters ........................................ ................ 91 6 Figures: Figure 1 - Lockable Handle ........................................ ........................................ .......................... 25 Figure 2 - RN Series C Cabinet, ........................................ ........................................ ................... 29 Figure 3 - Forklifting an RN Series A, B and C Cabinet, 11, 13 and 16-30 ton tons ................... 31 Figure 4 - Lifting Details of a 11, 13 and 16-30 ton tons ton Standard or Power Exhaust Unit .. 32 Figure 5 - Lifting Details of a 11, 13 and 16-30 ton tons Energy Recovery Wheel or Power Return 32 Figure 6 - Duct Connection ........................................ ........................................ ........................... 34 Figure 7 - 11, 13 and 16-30 35 Figure 8 - 11, 13 and 16-30 35 Figure 9 - Rain Hood with Metal Mesh Filter Rack Installation ........................................ .......... 36 Figure 10 - Unit Utility Entry ........................................ ........................................ ....................... 37 Figure 11 - Back View of Power Switch from Compressor and Control Compartment (11, 13 and 16-30 ton Units) ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ .... 37 Figure 12 - RN Series Gas Heat Exchanger ........................................ ........................................ .. 40 Figure 13 - Example 11, 13, 16-25 and 30 ton through the Base Gas Piping ............................... 42 Figure 14 - Draw-Through Drain Trap ........................................ ........................................ ......... 49 Figure 15 - Preheat Controller ........................................ ........................................ ...................... 51 Figure 16 - Supply Fan Banding ........................................ ........................................ ................... 64 Figure 17 - Plenum Fan Gap Tolerances ........................................ ........................................ ...... 65 Figure 18 - Fan with the HUB on the Top and RET on the Bottom ........................................ ..... 65 Figure 19 - Bushing Mount 66 Figure 20 - RET with Pin in Groove 4 ........................................ ........................................ .......... 66 Figure 21 - Fan HUB and RET Castings ........................................ ........................................ ...... 66 Figure 22 - Gas Heater Instructions ........................................ ........................................ .............. 71 Figure 23 - Gas Heat Exchanger ........................................ ........................................ ................... 79 Figure 24 - Removal of a Condenser Fan Assembly ........................................ ............................ 80 Figure 25 - Evaporator Coil Access ........................................ ........................................ .............. 81 Figure 26 - 9-25 and 30 ton Supply Fan ........................................ ........................................ ....... 86 Figure 27 - Bolts which Connect Motor Mount to Blower Fan ........................................ ............ 86 Figure 28 - Variable Capacity Compressor Controller ........................................ ......................... 89 Figure 29 - Compressor Controller Flash Code 90 Figure 30 - RN Series 11, 13, 16-25 and 30 ton Units ton Standard Filter Layouts ..................... 92 7 AAON RN Series Horizontal Configuration Features and Options Introduction Energy Efficiency Direct Drive Backward Curved Plenum Supply Fans Variable Capacity R-410A Scroll Compressors Airside Economizers Factory Installed AAONAIRE Energy Recovery Wheels Double Wall Rigid Polyurethane Foam Panel Construction, R-13 Insulation Modulating Natural Gas Heaters Modulating/SCR Electric Heaters Premium Efficiency Motors Variable Speed Supply/Return/Exhaust Fans Water-Cooled Condensers Air-Source, Water-Source and Geothermal Heat Pumps Indoor Air Quality 100% Outside Air Constant Volume Outside Air Control Economizer CO2 Override High Efficiency Filtration Double Wall Rigid Polyurethane Foam Panel Construction, R-13 Insulation Interior Corrosion Protection Humidity Control High Capacity Cooling Coils Variable Capacity Compressors Factory Installed AAONAIRE Total Energy Recovery Wheels Mixed/Return Air Bypass Modulating Hot Gas Reheat Safety Burglar Bars Freeze Stats Electric Preheat Phase and Brown Out Protection Supply/Return Smoke Detectors Supply/Return Firestats Installation and Maintenance Clogged Filter Switch Color Coded Wiring Diagram Compressors in Isolated Compartment Compressor Isolation Valves Convenience Outlet Direct Drive Supply Fans Hinged Access Doors with Lockable Handles Magnehelic Gauge Service Lights Sight Glass System Integration Chilled Water Cooling Coils Controls by Others Electric/Natural Gas/LP Heating Hot Water/Steam Heating Coil Non-Compressorized DX Coils Water-Cooled Condensers Environmentally Friendly Airside Economizers Factory Installed AAONAIRE Energy Recovery Wheels Mixed/Return Air Bypass R-410A Refrigerant Extended Life 5 Year Compressor Warranty 15 Year Aluminized Steel Heat Exchanger Warranty 25 Year Stainless Steel Heat Exchanger Warranty Condenser Coil Guards Interior Corrosion Protection Polymer E-Coated Coils - 5 Year Warranty Stainless Steel Coil Casing Stainless Steel Drain Pans 8 Safety Attention should be paid to the following statements: NOTE - Notes are intended to clarify the unit installation, operation, and maintenance. CAUTION - Caution statements are given to prevent actions that may result in equipment damage, property damage, or personal injury. WARNING - Warning statements are given to prevent actions that could result in equipment damage, property damage, personal injury or death. DANGER - Danger statements are given to prevent actions that will result in equipment damage, property damage, severe personal injury or death. ELECTRIC SHOCK, FIRE OR EXPLOSION HAZARD Failure to follow safety warnings exactly could result in dangerous operation, serious injury, death or property damage. Improper servicing could result in dangerous operation, serious injury, death, or property damage. Before servicing, disconnect all electrical power to the furnace. More than one disconnect may be provided. When servicing controls, label all wires prior to disconnecting. Reconnect wires correctly. Verify proper operation after servicing. Secure all doors with key-lock or nut and bolt. WARNING WHAT TO DO IF YOU SMELL GAS Do not try to turn on unit. Shut off main gas supply. Do not touch any electric switch. Do not use any phone in the building. Never test for gas leaks with an open flame. Use a gas detection soap solution and check all gas connections and shut off valves. CAUTION Electric shock hazard. Before servicing, shut off all electrical power to the unit, including remote disconnects, to avoid shock hazard or injury from rotating parts. Follow proper Lockout-Tagout procedures. WARNING 9 FIRE, EXPLOSION OR CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING HAZARD Failure to replace proper controls could result in fire, explosion, or carbon monoxide poisoning. Failure to follow safety warnings exactly could result in serious injury, death or property damage. Do not store or use gasoline or other flammable vapors and liquids in the vicinity of this appliance. WARNING During installation, testing, servicing, and troubleshooting of the equipment it may be necessary to work with live electrical components. Only a qualified licensed electrician or individual properly trained in handling live electrical components shall perform these tasks. Standard NFPA-70E, an OSHA regulation requiring an Arc Flash Boundary to be field established and marked for identification of where appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) be worn, should be followed. WARNING ROTATING COMPONENTS Unit contains fans with moving parts that can cause serious injury. Do not open door containing fans until the power to the unit has been disconnected and fan wheel has stopped rotating. WARNING GROUNDING REQUIRED All field installed wiring must be completed by qualified personnel. Field installed wiring must comply with NEC/CEC, local and state electrical code requirements. Failure to follow code requirements could result in serious injury or death. Provide proper unit ground in accordance with these code requirements. WARNING VARIABLE FREQUENCY DRIVES Do not leave VFDs unattended in hand mode or manual bypass. Damage to personnel or equipment can occur if left unattended. When in hand mode or manual bypass mode VFDs will not respond to controls or alarms. WARNING10 Electric motor over-current protection and overload protection may be a function of the Variable Frequency Drive to which the motors are wired. Never defeat the VFD motor overload feature. The overload ampere setting must not exceed 115% of the electric motor s FLA rating as shown on the motor nameplate. CAUTION UNIT HANDLING To prevent injury or death lifting equipment capacity shall exceed unit weight by an adequate safety factor. Always test-lift unit not more than 24 inches high to verify proper center of gravity lift point to avoid unit damage, injury or death. WARNING Failure to properly drain and vent coils when not in use during freezing temperature may result in coil and equipment damage. CAUTION Rotation must be checked on all MOTORS AND COMPRESSORS of 3 phase units at startup by a qualified service technician. Scroll compressors are directional and can be damaged if rotated in the wrong direction. Compressor rotation must be checked using suction and discharge gauges. Fan motor rotation should be checked for proper operation. Alterations should only be made at the unit power connection CAUTION Do not use oxygen, acetylene or air in place of refrigerant and dry nitrogen for leak testing. A violent explosion may result causing injury or death. WARNING WATER PRESSURE Prior to connection of condensing water supply, verify water pressure is less than maximum pressure shown on unit nameplate. To prevent injury or death due to instantaneous release of high pressure water, relief valves should be field supplied on system water piping. WARNING 11 Always use a pressure regulator, valves and gauges to control incoming pressures when pressure testing a system. Excessive pressure may cause line ruptures, equipment damage or an explosion which may result in injury or death. WARNING To prevent damage to the unit, do not use acidic chemical coil cleaners. Do not use alkaline chemical coil cleaners with a pH value greater than , after mixing, without first using an aluminum corrosion inhibitor in the cleaning solution. CAUTION Some chemical coil cleaning compounds are caustic or toxic. Use these substances only in accordance with the manufacturer s usage instructions. Failure to follow instructions may result in equipment damage, injury or death. WARNING Do not clean DX refrigerant coils with hot water or steam. The use of hot water or steam on refrigerant coils will cause high pressure inside the coil tubing and damage to the coil. CAUTION Door compartments containing hazardous voltage or rotating parts are equipped with door latches to allow locks. Door latch are shipped with nut and bolts requiring tooled access. If you do not replace the shipping hardware with a pad lock always re-install the nut & bolt after closing the door. CAUTION Cleaning the cooling tower or condenser water loop with harsh chemicals such as hydrochloric acid (muriatic acid), chlorine or other chlorides, can damage the refrigerant-to-water heat exchanger. Care should be taken to avoid allowing chemicals to enter the refrigerant-to-water heat exchanger. See Appendix A - Heat Exchanger Corrosion Resistance for more information. CAUTION OPEN LOOP APPLICATIONS Failure of the condenser as a result of chemical corrosion is excluded from coverage under AAON Inc. warranties and the heat exchanger manufacturer s warranties. WARNING12 1. Startup and service must be performed by a Factory Trained Service Technician. 2. Use only with type of the gas approved for the furnace. Refer to the furnace rating plate. 3. The unit is for outdoor use only. See General Information section for more information. 4. Provide adequate combustion ventilation air to the furnace. If a vent duct extension is used, a class III approved vent is required. See the Locating Units and Gas Heating sections of the Installation section of the manual. 5. Always install and operate furnace within the intended temperature rise range and duct system external static pressure (ESP) as specified on the unit nameplate. 6. The supply and return air ducts must be derived from the same space. It is recommended ducts be provided with access panels to allow inspection for duct tightness. When a down flow duct is used with electric heat, the exhaust duct should be an L shaped duct. 7. Clean furnace, duct and components upon completion of the construction setup. Verify furnace operating conditions including input rate, temperature rise and ESP. 8. Every unit has a unique equipment nameplate with electrical, operational, and unit clearance specifications. Always refer to the unit nameplate for specific ratings unique to the model you have purchased. 9. READ THE ENTIRE INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL. OTHER IMPORTANT SAFETY PRECAUTIONS ARE PROVIDED THROUGHOUT THIS MANUAL. 10. Keep this manual and all literature safeguarded near or on the unit. WATER FREEZING Failure of the condenser due to freezing will allow water to enter the refrigerant circuit and will cause extensive damage to the refrigerant circuit components. Any damage to the equipment as a result of water freezing in the condenser is excluded from coverage under AAON warranties and the heat exchanger manufacturer warranties. WARNING COMPRESSOR CYCLING 5 MINUTE MINIMUM OFF TIME To prevent motor overheating compressors must cycle off for a minimum of 5 minutes. 5 MINUTE MINIMUM ON TIME To maintain the proper oil level compressors must cycle on for a minimum of 5 minutes. The cycle rate must not exceed 6 starts per hour. WARNING WARNING 13 RN Series Feature String Nomenclature GEN MJREV SIZE SERIES MNREV VLT A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 1 2 3A 3B 3C 3D 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 5C 5D 6A 6B 6C 6D 7 8 9A 9B 9C 9D 10A 10B RN A - 11 - C 0 - 3 - A A A 0 2 - B 0 1 B 0 : 01 -DQ0J -E00 - 0000- 0 0 0 0 - D A-A0AA-C0 B 0 - G - 0 0 0 - 4 A - E A 0 0 - 0 0 - 5 W 0 - B F 0 Q A 0 - A 0 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 0 0 X 11A 11B 12 13A 13B 13C 14 15 16A 16B 16C 16D 17A 17B 18A 18B 18C 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 MODEL OPTIONS SERIES AND GENERATION RN MAJOR REVISION A UNIT SIZE 011= 11 ton Capacity 013= 13 ton Capacity 016 = 16 ton Capacity 018 = 18 ton Capacity 020 = 20 ton Capacity 025 = 25 ton Capacity 030 = 30 ton Capacity SERIES C = 011, 013, 016, 018, 020, 025, 030 units MINOR REVISION 0 VOLTAGE 2 = 230V/3 /60Hz 3 = 460V/3 /60Hz 4 = 575V/3 /60Hz 6 = 380V/3 /50Hz 8 = 208V/3 /60Hz Model Option A: COOLING/HEAT PUMP A1: COMPRESSOR STYLE 0 = No Compressor A = R-410A Scroll Compressor D = R-410A Variable Capacity Scroll Compressor A2: CONDENSER STYLE 0 = No Condenser A = Microchannel Air-Cooled Condenser F = Water-Cooled Condenser J = Air-Source Heat Pump L = Water-Source Heat Pump N = DX Air Handling Unit A3: INDOOR COIL CONFIGURATION 0 = No Cooling Coil A = Standard Evaporator B = 6 Row Evaporator E = 4 Row Chilled Water Coil F = 6 Row Chilled Water Coil A4: COOLING HEAT EXCHANGER CONSTRUCTION 0 = Standard A = Polymer E-Coated Cooling Coil B = Stainless Steel Cooling Coil Casing E = Polymer E-Coated Cond. Coil J = Polymer E-Coated Evap. And Cond. Coil N = SMO 254 Corrosion Resistant Refrigerant-to-Water Heat Exchanger P = Polymer E-Coated Evap. Coil + SMO 254 Corrosion Resistant Refrigerant-to-Water Heat Exchanger Q = Stainless Steel Evap. Coil Casing + SMO 254 Corrosion Resistant Refrigerant-to-Water Heat Exchanger A5: COOLING STAGING 0 = No Cooling A = 1 Variable Capacity Comp + 1 On/Off Comp B = 2 Variable Capacity Comp F = Single Serpentine 8 FPI G = Half Serpentine 8 FPI H = Single Serpentine 10 FPI J = Half Serpentine 10 FPI K = Single Serpentine 12 FPI L = Half Serpentine 12 FPI N = DX Air Handler with 2 Refrigeration Circuits 2 = 2 Stage 14 RN Series Feature String Nomenclature GEN MJREV SIZE SERIES MNREV VLT A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 1 2 3A 3B 3C 3D 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 5C 5D 6A 6B 6C 6D 7 8 9A 9B 9C 9D 10A 10B RN A - 11 - C 0 - 3 - A A A 0 2 - B 0 1 B 0: 01 -DQ0J -E00 - 0000- 0 0 0 0 - D A-A0AA-C0 B 0 - G - 0 0 0 - 4 A - E A 0 0 - 0 0 - 5 W 0 - B F 0 Q A 0 - A 0 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 0 0 X 11A 11B 12 13A 13B 13C 14 15 16A 16B 16C 16D 17A 17B 18A 18B 18C 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 Model Option B: HEATING B1: HEAT TYPE 0 = No Heat B = Electric Heat D = Natural Gas G = LP Gas K = Hot Water Coil B2: HEAT CONSTRUCTION 0 = Standard A = Aluminized Heat Exchanger B = Stainless Steel Heat Exchanger C = High Altitude Aluminized Heat Exchanger D = High Altitude Stainless Steel Heat Exchanger G= Polymer E-Coated Heating Coil B3: HEAT DESIGNATION 0 = No Heat 1 = 20 kW 2 = 40 kW 3 = 60 kW 4 = 80 kW 5 = 100 kW 6 = 120 kW 1= 270 MBH 2= 405 MBH 3= 540 MBH A = 1 Row E = 2 Row B4: HEAT STAGING 0 = No Heat A = 1 Stage B = 2 Stage C = 3 Stage D = 4 Stage E = 5 Stage F = 6 Stage G = 7 Stage H = 8 Stage K = Modulating Gas Heat M = Modulating SCR Electric with Potentiometer Control N = Modulating SCR Electric with External 0-10 VDC P = Single Serpentine 8 FPI Q = Half Serpentine 8 FPI R = Single Serpentine 10 FPI S = Half Serpentine 10 FPI T = Single Serpentine 12 FPI U = Half Serpentine 12 FPI B5: HEAT PUMP AUX HEATING 0 = No Heat Pump A = Aux Heat 1 for Heat Pump 1 Stage B = Aux Heat 2 for Heat Pump 1 Stage C = Aux Heat 3 for Heat Pump 1 Stage D = Aux Heat 4 for Heat Pump 1 Stage E = Aux Heat 5 for Heat Pump 1 Stage F = Aux Heat 6 for Heat Pump 1 Stage K = Aux Heat 1 for Heat Pump 2 Stage L = Aux Heat 2 for Heat Pump 2 Stage M = Aux Heat 3 for Heat Pump 2 Stage N = Aux Heat 4 for Heat Pump 2 Stage P = Aux Heat 5 for Heat Pump 2 Stage Q = Aux Heat 6 for Heat Pump 2 Stage U = Aux Heat 1 for Heat Pump 4 Stage V = Aux Heat 2 for Heat Pump 4 Stage W = Aux Heat 3 for Heat Pump 4 Stage Y = Aux Heat 4 for Heat Pump 4 Stage Z = Aux Heat 5 for Heat Pump 4 Stage 1 = Aux Heat 6 for Heat Pump 4 Stage 15 RN Series Feature String Nomenclature GEN MJREV SIZE SERIE MNRE VLT A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 1 2 3A 3B 3C 3D 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 5C 5D 6A 6B 6C 6D 7 8 9A 9B 9C 9D 10A 10B RN A - 11 - C 0 - 3 - A A A 0 2 - B 0 1 B 0 :01 -DQ0J-E00 - 0000- 0 0 0 0 - D A-A0AA-C0 B 0 - G - 0 0 0 - 4 A - E A 0 0 - 0 0 - 5 W 0 - B F 0 Q A 0 - A 0 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 0 0 X 11A 11B 12 13A 13B 13C 14 15 16A 16B 16C 16D 17A 17B 18A 18B 18C 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 1: UNIT ORIENTATION 0 = Standard Access - Hinged Access Doors with Lockable Handles 2: SUPPLY & RETURN LOCATIONS V = End Supply--No Return Z= End Supply--Right Return 1 = Horizontal Configuration- End Supply--End Return Feature 3: SUPPLY FAN OPTIONS 3A: SUPPLY FAN CONFIGURATION 0 = 1 Fan D = 1 Fan + Factory Installed VFD N = 1 Fan + Field Installed VFD 3B: SUPPLY FAN L = 22" Direct Drive Backward Curved Plenum - 100% Width Aluminum N = 24" Direct Drive Backward Curved Plenum - 100% Width Aluminum P = 24" Direct Drive Backward Curved Plenum - 70% Width Aluminum Q = 27" Direct Drive Backward Curved Plenum - 100% Width Aluminum R = 27" Direct Drive Backward Curved Plenum - 70% Width Aluminum 3C: SUPPLY FAN MOTOR TYPE 0 = High Efficiency Motor (1,200 nominal rpm) A = High Efficiency Motor (1,800 nominal rpm) 3D: SUPPLY FAN MOTOR SIZE E = 1 hp G = 2 hp H = 3 hp J = 5 hp K = hp L = 10 hp M = 15 hp N = 20 hp 16 RN Series Feature String Nomenclature GEN MJREV SIZE SERIES MNREV VLT A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 1 2 3A 3B 3C 3D 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 5C 5D 6A 6B 6C 6D 7 8 9A 9B 9C 9D 10A 10B RN A - 11 - C 0 - 3 - A A A 0 2 - B 0 1 B 0 : 0 1 - D Q 0 J -E00 - 0000- 0 0 0 0 - D A - A 0 A A - C 0 B 0 - G - 0 0 0 - 4 A - E A 0 0 - 0 0 - 5 W 0 - B F 0 Q A 0 - A 0 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 0 0 X 11A 11B 12 13A 13B 13C 14 15 16A 16B 16C 16D 17A 17B 18A 18B 18C 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 Feature 4: RETURN/OUTSIDE AIR OPTIONS 4A: OUTSIDE AIR SECTION 0 = 100% Outside Air A = 100% Outside Air with Motorized Dampers B = Manual Outside Air + Return Air Opening C = Motorized Outside Air Dampers + Return Air Opening D = 100% Return Air E = Economizer G = Econ + Power Exhaust H = Econ + Power Return K = Econ + Energy Recovery Q = Econ + Energy Recovery + Bypass Damper 4B: ENERGY RECOVERY TYPE 0 = No Energy Recovery A = Energy Recovery Wheel B= Energy Recovery Wheel + 1% Purge 4C: ENERGY RECOVERY SIZE 0 = No Energy Recovery A = Low CFM Enthalpy B = High CFM Enthalpy E = Low CFM Sensible F = High CFM Sensible J = Low CFM Enthalpy + Exhaust Filters K = High CFM Enthalpy + Exhaust Filters N = Low CFM Sensible + Exhaust Filters P = High CFM Sensible + Exhaust Filters Feature 5: RETUREN FAN OPTIONS 5A: RETURN FAN CONFIGURATION 0 = Standard A = 1 Fan B = 2 Fans C = 1 Fan + Factory Installed VFD D = 2 Fans + 1 Factory Installed VFD E = 2 Fans + 2 Factory Installed VFD's G = 1 Fan + Field Installed VFD H = 2 Fans + 1 Field Installed VFD J = 2 Fans + 2 Field Installed VFD's 5B: RETURN FANS 0 = Standard B = 22" Direct Drive Axial Flow Fan 5C: RETURN FAN MOTOR TYPE 0 = Standard A = High Efficiency Motor (1,200 nominal rpm) B = High Efficiency Motor (1,800 nominal rpm) 5D: RETURN MOTOR SIZE 0 = Standard E = 1 hp G = 2 hp H = 3 hp J = 5 hp K = hp L = 10 hp M = 15 hp N = 20 hp 17 RN Series Feature String Nomenclature GEN MJREV SIZE SERIES MNREV VLT A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 1 2 3A 3B 3C 3D 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 5C 5D 6A 6B 6C 6D 7 8 9A 9B 9C 9D 10A 10B RN A - 11 - C 0 - 3 - A A A 0 2 - B 0 1 B 0 : 01 -DQ0J -E00 - 0000-0 0 0 0 - D A-A0AA-C0 B 0 - G - 0 0 0 - 4 A - E A 0 0 - 0 0 - 5 W 0 - B F 0 Q A 0 - A 0 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 0 0 X 11A 11B 12 13A 13B 13C 14 15 16A 16B 16C 16D 17A 17B 18A 18B 18C 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 Feature 6: EXHAUST FAN OPTIONS 6A: EXHAUST FAN CONFIGURATION 0 = Standard A = 1 Fan C = 1 Fan + Factory Installed VFD G = 1 Fan + Field Installed VFD 6B: EXHAUST FAN 0 = Standard L = 22" Backward Curved Plenum Fan - 100% Width Aluminum T= 22" Backward Curved Plenum Fan - 70% Width Aluminum 6C: EXHAUST FAN MOTOR TYPE 0 = Standard B = High Efficiency Motor (1,800 nominal rpm) 6D: EXHUAST MOTOR 0 = Standard E = 1 hp G = 2 hp H = 3 hp J = 5 hp K = hp L = 10 hp M = 15 hp N = 20 hp 7: O/A CONTROL 0 = Standard A = 3 Position Actuator - Sensible Limit B = 3 Position Actuator - Enthalpy Limit C = Fully Modulating Actuator - Sensible Limit D = Fully Modulating Actuator - Enthalpy Limit E = DDC Actuator F = Constant Volume Outside Air G = Options A + F H = Options B + F J = Options C + F K = Options D + F L = Options E + F M = 3 Pos. Act. - Sensible Limit + CO2 Override N = 3 Pos. Act. - Enthalpy Limit + CO2 Override P = Fully Mod. Act. - Sensible + CO2 Override Q = Fully Mod. Act. - Enthalpy + CO2 Override R = DDC Actuator + CO2 Override S = Dual Minimum Position Potentiometers + Fully Mod. Act. - Sensible Limit T = Dual Minimum Position Potentiometers + Fully Mod. Act. - Enthalpy Limit U = 2 Position Actuator 8: EXHAUST DAMPERS & RA BYPASS 0 = No Return Opening A = Standard Return Opening without EA Dampers C = Standard Barometric Relief EA Dampers G= Standard Barometric without EA Dampers + RA Bypass J = Standard Barometric Relief EA Dampers + RA Bypass 18 RN Series Feature String Nomenclature GEN MJREV SIZE SERIES MNREV VLT A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 1 2 3A 3B 3C 3D 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 5C 5D 6A 6B 6C 6D 7 8 9A 9B 9C 9D 10A 10B RN A - 11 - C 0 - 3 - A A A 0 2 - B 0 1 B 0 : 01 -DQ0J -E00 - 0000- 0 0 0 0 - D A-A0AA - C0 B 0 - G - 0 0 0 - 4 A - E A 0 0 - 0 0 - 5 W 0 - B F 0 Q A 0 - A 0 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 0 0 X 11A 11B 12 13A 13B 13C 14 15 16A 16B 16C 16D 17A 17B 18A 18B 18C 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 Feature 9: FILTER OPTIONS 9A: UNIT FILTER TYPE 0 = 2 Pleated - 30% Eff. - MERV 8 A = 4 Pleated - 30% Eff. - MERV 8 B = 2" Pleated MERV 8 + 4" Pleated MERV 11 C = 2" Pleated MERV 8 + 4" Pleated MERV 13 D = 2" Pleated MERV 8 + 4" Pleated MERV 14 9B: PRE FILTER BOX SIZE/LOCATION 0 = Standard Filters in Standard Position B = High Efficiency Filters in Standard Position 9C: FINAL FILTER TYPE 0 = No Final Filters A = 12" Cartridge MERV 13 D = 12" Cartridge MERV 14 U= 4" Pleated MERV 13 Y= 4" Pleated MERV 14 9D: FILTER OPTIONS 0 = None A = Clogged Filter Switch - Unit Filters B = Clogged Filter Switch - Unit + Energy Recovery Filters C = Clogged Filter Switch - Unit + Final Filters D = Clogged Filter Switch - Unit + Energy Recovery + Final Filters E = Magnehelic Gauge - Unit Filters F = Magnehelic Gauge - Unit + Energy Recovery Filters G = Magnehelic Gauge - Unit + Final Filters H = Magnehelic Gauge - Unit + Energy Recovery + Final Filters J = CFS + Magnehelic Gauge - Unit Filters K = CFS + Magnehelic Gauge - Unit + Energy Recovery Filters L = CFS + Magnehelic Gauge - Unit + Final Filters M = CFS + Magnehelic Gauge - Unit + Energy Recovery + Final Filters Feature 10: REFRIGERATION CONTROL 10A: REFRIGERATION CONTROL 0 = None A = 5 Minute Compressor Off Timer and 20 Second Compressor Stage Delay B = Fan Cycling C = Adjustable Fan Cycling D = Adjustable Compressor Lock Outs (each circuit) E = Freeze Stats (each circuit) F = Option A + B G = Option A + C H = Option A + D J = Option A + E K = Option B + D L = Option B + E M = Option C + D N = Option C + E P = Option D + E Q = Option A + B + D R = Option A + B + E S = Option B + D + E T = Option C + D + E U = Option A + B + D + E V = Option A + C + D + E 10B: BLANK 0 = None 19 RN Series Feature String Nomenclature GEN MJREV SIZE SERIES MNREV VLT A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 1 2 3A 3B 3C 3D 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 5C 5D 6A 6B 6C 6D 7 8 9A 9B 9C 9D 10A 10B RN A - 11 - C 0 - 3 - A A A 0 2 - B 0 1 B 0 : 01 -DQ0J -E00 - 0000- 0 0 0 0 - D A-A0AA-C0 B 0 - G - 0 0 0 - 4 A - E A 0 0 - 0 0 - 5 W 0 - B F 0 Q A 0 - A 0 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 0 0 X 11A 11B 12 13A 13B 13C 14 15 16A 16B 16C 16D 17A 17B 18A 18B 18C 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 Feature 11: REFRIGERATION OPTIONS 11A: REFRIGERATION OPTIONS 0 = None A = Hot Gas Bypass Lead Stage B = Hot Gas Bypass Lead and Lag Stages C = On/Off Hot Gas Reheat D = Hot Gas Bypass Non-Variable Compressor Circuits E = Modulating Hot Gas Reheat G = Options A + C H = Options B + C J = Options A + E K = Options B + E L = Options D + C M = Options D + E P = Polymer E-Coated On/Off Hot Gas Reheat Q = Polymer E-Coated Modulating Hot Gas Reheat R = Options A + P S = Options B + P T = Options A + D U = Options B + Q V = Options D + P W = Options D + Q 11B: BLANK 0 = None 12: REFRIGERATION ACCESSORIES 0 = None A = Sight Glass B = Compressor Isolation Valves C = Option A + B D = One Circuit 0 F Low Ambient E = Option A + D F = Option B + D G = Option A + B + D Feature 13: POWER OPTIONS 13A: UNIT DISCONNECT TYPE 0 = Single Point Power - Standard Power Block A = Single Point Power - Non-fused Disconnect Power Switch 13B: DISCONNECT 1 SIZE N = 100 amps R = 150 amps U = 225 amps Z = 400 amps 3 = 600 amps 13C: BLANK 0 = None 14: SAFETY OPTIONS 0 = None A = Return and Supply Air Firestat B = Return Air Smoke Detector C = Supply Air Smoke Detector E = Remote Safety Shutdown Terminals F = Option A + B G = Option A + C J = Option A + E K = Option B + C M = Option B + E P = Option C + E R = Option A + B + C T = Option A + B + E V = Option A + C + E Z = Option B + C + E 4 = Option A + B + C + E 20 RN Series Feature String Nomenclature GEN MJREV SIZE SERIES MNREV VLT A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 1 2 3A 3B 3C 3D 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 5C 5D 6A 6B 6C 6D 7 8 9A 9B 9C 9D 10A 10B RN A - 11 - C 0 - 3 - A A A 0 2 - B 0 1 B 0 : 01 -DQ0J -E00 - 0000- 0 0 0 0 - D A-A0AA-C0 B 0 - G - 0 0 0 - 4 A - E A 0 0- 0 0 - 5 W 0 - B F 0 Q A 0 - A 0 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 0 0 X 11A 11B 12 13A 13B 13C 14 15 16A 16B 16C 16D 17A 17B 18A 18B 18C 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 15: ACCESSORIES 0 = None A = Low Limit Controls B = Phase & Brown Out Protection F = Option A + B Feature 16: UNIT CONTROLS 16A: CONTROL SEQUENCE 0 = Standard Terminal Block for Thermostat A = Terminal Block for Thermostat + Isolation Relays B = Single Zone VAV Unit Controller - VAV Cool + CAV Heat C = Single Zone VAV Unit Controller - VAV Cool + VAV Heat D = VAV Unit Controller - VAV Cool + CAV Heat E = Constant Air Volume Unit Controller - CAV Cool + CAV Heat F = Makeup Air Unit Controller G = Single Zone VAV Heat Pump Unit Controller - VAV Cool + VAV Heat H = Constant Air Volume Heat Pump Unit Controller - CAV Cool + CAV Heat J = Makeup Air Heat Pump Unit Controller - CAV Cool + CAV Heat K = PAC - Precise Air Controller (No VCC) L = D-PAC - Digital Precise Air Controller M = Field Installed DDC Controls by Others N = Field Installed DDC Controls + Installation Relays P = Factory Installed DDC Controls by Others + Installation Relays 16B: CONTROL SUPPLIER 0 = None A = WattMaster VCM-X C = WattMaster VCB-X E = JENEsys 16C: CONTROL SUPPLIER OPTIONS 0 = None B = Web UI 16D: BMS CONNECTION & DIAGNOSTICS 0 = None A = BACnet IP B = BACnet MSTP C = Modbus IP D = Modbus RTU E = Lontalk F = Fox 21 RN Series Feature String Nomenclature GEN MJREV SIZE SERIES MNREV VLT A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 1 2 3A 3B 3C 3D 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 5C 5D 6A 6B 6C 6D 7 8 9A 9B 9C 9D 10A 10B RN A - 11 - C 0 - 3 - A A A 0 2 - B 0 1 B 0 : 01 -DQ0J -E00 - 0000- 0 0 0 0 - D A-A0AA-C0 B 0 - G - 0 0 0 - 4 A - E A 0 0 -0 0 - 5W0 - BF 0 Q A 0 - A 0 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 0 0 X 11A 11B 12 13A 13B 13C 14 15 16A 16B 16C 16D 17A 17B 18A 18B 18C 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 Feature 17: PREHEAT OPTIONS 17A: PREHEAT CONFIGURATION 0 = Standard A = Modulating Electric Preheat - Outside Air D = Hot Water Preheat Coil -Mixed Air E = Steam Distributing Preheat Coil -Mixed Air K = Polymer E-Coated Hot Water Preheat Coil -Mixed Air L = Polymer E-Coated Steam Distributing Preheat Coil - Mixed Air 17B: PREHEAT SIZING 0 = Standard A = Heat Qty A B = Heat Qty B C = Heat Qty C D = Heat Qty D E = Heat Qty E F = Heat Qty F G = Heat Qty G H = Heat Qty H J = Heat Qty J K = Heat Qty K L = Heat Qty L M = Heat Qty M Feature 18: OPTION BOXES 18A: BOX QUANTITY & LOCATION 0 = None 5= Empty Energy Recovery Wheel Option Box 18B: BOX SIZE 0 = None W= Empty Energy Recovery Wheel Option Box 18C: BOX ACCESSORIES 0 = None 19: OUTSIDE AIR ACCESSORIES 0 = No Outside Air Hood - 100% Return Air A = Outside Air Hood B = Outside Air Hood with Metal Mesh Filters 22 RN Series Feature String Nomenclature GEN MJREV SIZE SERIES MNREV VLT A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 1 2 3A 3B 3C 3D 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 5C 5D 6A 6B 6C 6D 7 8 9A 9B 9C 9D 10A 10B RN A - 11 - C 0 - 3 - A A A 0 2 - B 0 1 B 0 : 01 -DQ0J -E00 - 0000- 0 0 0 0 - D A-A0AA-C0 B 0 - G - 0 0 0 - 4 A - E A 0 0 - 0 0 - 5 W 0 - BF 0 Q A 0 - A 0 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 0 0 X 11A 11B 12 13A 13B 13C 14 15 16A 16B 16C 16D 17A 17B 18A 18B 18C 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 20: CABINET OPTIONS 0 = None A = Base Insulation B = SA & RA Burglar Bars F = Option A + B 21: BLANK 0 = None 22: MAINTENANCE ACCESSORIES 0 = None A = Factory Wired 115V Convenience Outlet B = Field Wired 115V Convenience Outlet C = Service Lights D = Remote Start/Stop contacts E = Supply Fan Auxiliary Contacts F = Option A + C G = Option A + D H = Option A + E J = Option B + C K = Option B + D L = Option B + E M = Option C + D N = Option C + E P = Option D + E Q = Option A + C + D R = Option A + C + E S = Option A + D + E T = Option B + C + D U = Option B + C + E V = Option B + D + E W = Option C + D + E Y = Option A + C + D + E Z = Option B + C + D + E 23: CODE OPTIONS 0 = Standard - ETL Listing A = Chicago Code B = ETL + Canada Listing 24: SHIPPING SPLITS 0 = Standard 25: AIR COOLED CONDENSER ACESSORIES 0 = Standard A = Cond Coil Guards C = ECM Condenser Fan Head Pressure Control E = VFD Condenser Fan Head Pressure Control G = Cond Coil Guards + ECM Condenser Fan Head Pressure Control J = Cond Coil Guards + VFD Cond Fan Head Pressure Control 26: BLANK 0 = None 23 RN Series Feature String Nomenclature GEN MJREV SIZE SERIES MNREV VLT A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 1 2 3A 3B 3C 3D 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 5C 5D 6A 6B 6C 6D 7 8 9A 9B 9C 9D 10A 10B RN A - 11 - C 0 - 3 - A A A 0 2 - B 0 1 B 0 : 01 -DQ0J -E00 - 0000- 0 0 0 0 - D A-A0AA-C0 B 0 - G - 0 0 0 - 4 A - E A 0 0 - 0 0 - 5 W 0 - B F 0 Q A 0 - A 0 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 0 0 X 11A 11B 12 13A 13B 13C 14 15 16A 16B 16C 16D 17A 17B 18A 18B 18C 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 27: WATER - COOLED CONDENSER ACCESSORIES 0 = None (No Water Condenser) A = Balancing Valves B = Water Flow Switch D = Motorized Shut-off Valve E = Head Pressure Control F = Option A + B H = Option A + D J = Option A + E L = Option B + D M = Option B + E R = Option A + B + D S = Option A + B + E 28: ENERGY RECOVERY WHEEL ACCESSORIES 0 = None A = Energy Recovery Wheel Defrost - Start/Stop B = Energy Recovery Wheel Rotation Detection F = Option A + B 29: BLANK 0 = None 30: BLANK 0 = Standard 31: BLANK 0 = Standard 32: BLANK 0 = Standard 33: BLANK 0 = Standard 34: BLANK 0 = Standard 35: WARRANTY 0 = Standard Warranty A = 2 Year Parts Warranty B = 5 Year Parts Warranty C = 10 Year Parts Warranty 36: CABINET MATERIAL 0 = Galvanized Cabinet 37: TYPE B = Premium AAON Gray Paint Exterior Paint C = Premium AAON Gray Paint Exterior Paint + Interior Corrosion Protection X = SPA + Premium AAON Gray Paint Exterior Paint Y = SPA + Premium AAON Gray Paint Exterior Paint + Interior Corrosion Protection 4 = SPA + Special Exterior Paint Color 5 = SPA + Special Exterior Paint Color + Interior Corrosion Protection 24 General Information RN Series packaged rooftop units, heat pumps and outdoor air handling units have been designed for outdoor installation only. Units are assembled, wired, charged and run tested at the factory. Startup and service must be performed by a Factory Trained Service Technician. Certification of Gas Heat Models a. AAON gas heat exchangers have successfully completed 10,000 burner operation cycles and corrosion resistance as specified per test standard ANSI All gas heat exchangers used in AAON appliances are certified for use downstream of evaporator or cooling coils. b. Certified as a Category III forced air furnace with or without cooling. c. Certified for outdoor installation only. d. Certified for installation on a combustible roof with a minimum of 12 high curb. Certification of Steam or Hot Water Heat Models a. Certified as a forced air heating system with or without cooling. b. Certified for outdoor installation only. c. Certified for installation on a combustible roof with a minimum of 12 high curb. Certification of Electric Heat Models a. Certified as an electric warm air furnace with or without cooling. b. Certified for outdoor installation only. c. Certified for installation on a combustible roof with a minimum of 12 high curb. Certification of Cooling Models a. Certified as a commercial central air conditioner with or without electrically operated compressors. b. Certified for outdoor installation only. c. Certified for installation on a combustible roof with a minimum of 12 high curb. d. Certified with refrigerant R-410A coils or with chilled water cooling coils. Codes and Ordinances RN Series units have been tested and certified, by ETL, in accordance with UL Safety Standard 1995/CSA No. 236, ANSI Safety Standard , and ANSI Safety Standard System should be sized in accordance with the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers Handbook. Improper installation, adjustment, alteration, service, or maintenance can cause property damage, personal injury or loss of life. Startup and service must be performed by a Factory Trained Service Technician. A copy of this IOM should be kept with the unit. WARNING These units must not be used for heating or cooling at any time during any phase of construction. Very low return air temperatures, harmful vapors, and misplacement of the filters will damage the unit and its efficiency. CAUTION 25 Installation of RN Series units must conform to the ICC standards of the International Mechanical Code, the International Building Code, and local building, plumbing and waste water codes. In the absence of local codes installation must conform to the current (United States) National Fuel Gas Code 54 or the current (Canada) National Fuel & Propane Installation Code CSA or , and Mechanical Refrigeration Code CSA B52. All appliances must be electrically grounded in accordance with local codes, or in the absence of local codes, the current National Electric Code, ANSI/NFPA 70 or the current Canadian Electrical Code CSA Receiving Unit When received, the unit should be checked for damage that might have occurred in transit. If damage is found it should be noted on the carrier s freight bill. A request for inspection by carrier s agent should be made in writing at once. Nameplate should be checked to ensure the correct model sizes and voltages have been received to match the job requirements. If repairs must be made to damaged goods, then the factory should be notified before any repair action is taken in order to protect the warranty. Certain equipment alteration, repair, and manipulation of equipment without the manufacturer s consent may void the product warranty. Contact the AAON Warranty Department for assistance with handling damaged goods, repairs, and freight claims: (918) 583-2266. Note: Upon receipt check shipment for items that ship loose such as filters and remote sensors. Consult order and shipment documentation to identify potential loose-shipped items. Loose-shipped items may have been placed inside unit cabinet for security. Installers and owners should secure all doors with locks or nuts and bolts to prevent unauthorized access. Figure 1 - Lockable Handle The Clean Air Act of 1990 bans the intentional venting of refrigerant as of July 1, 1992. Approved methods of recovery, recycling, or reclaiming must be followed. CAUTION Coils and sheet metal surfaces present sharp edges and care must be taken when working with equipment. WARNING Failure to observe the following instructions will result in premature failure of your system and possible voiding of the warranty. WARNING 26 The warranty card must be completed in full and returned to AAON not more than 3 months after unit is delivered. Storage If installation will not occur immediately following delivery, store equipment in a dry protected area away from construction traffic and in the proper orientation as marked on the packaging with all internal packaging in place. Secure all loose-shipped items. Packaged Direct Expansion (DX) Units All DX refrigeration systems are factory assembled, leak tested, charged with refrigerant, and run tested. All refrigerant systems include an evaporator, condenser, liquid line filter driers, thermal expansion valves (TXV) and scroll compressors. Compressors are equipped with a positive pressure forced lubrication system. Never cut off the main power supply to the unit, except for servicing, emergency, or complete shutdown of the unit. When power is cut off from the unit crankcase heaters cannot prevent refrigerant migration into the compressors. This means the compressor will cool down and liquid refrigerant may accumulate in the compressor. The compressor is designed to pump refrigerant gas and damage may occur when power is restored. If power to the unit must be off for more than an hour, turn the thermostat system switch to "OFF", or turn the unit off at the control panel, and leave the unit off until the main power switch has been turned on again for at least 24 hours for units with compressor crankcase heaters. This will give the crankcase heater time to clear any liquid accumulation out of the compressor before it is started. Always control the unit from the thermostat, or control panel, never at the main power supply, except for servicing, emergency or complete shutdown of the unit. During the cooling season, if the air flow is reduced due to dirty air filters or any other reason, the cooling coils can get too cold which will cause excessive liquid to return to the compressor. As the liquid COMPRESSOR CYCLING 5 MINUTE MINIMUM OFF TIME To prevent motor overheating compressors must cycle off for a minimum of 5 minutes. 5 MINUTE MINIMUM ON TIME To maintain the proper oil level compressors must cycle on for a minimum of 5 minutes. The cycle rate must not exceed 6 starts per hour. WARNING CRANKCASE HEATER OPERATION Some units are equipped with compressor crankcase heaters, which should be energized at least 24 hours prior to cooling operation, to clear any liquid refrigerant from the compressors. CAUTION 27 concentration builds up, oil is washed out of the compressor, leaving it starved for lubrication. The compressor life will be seriously shorted by reduced lubrication and the pumping of excessive amounts of liquid oil and refrigerant. Note: Low Ambient Operation Air-cooled DX units without a low ambient option, such as condenser fan cycling or the 0 F low ambient option, will not operate in the cooling mode of operation properly when the outdoor temperature is below 55 F. Low ambient and/or economizer options are recommended if cooling operation below 55 F is expected. Note: Multiple Units with Multiple Thermostats When several heating and cooling units are used to condition a space all unit thermostat switches must be set in either heating mode, cooling mode or off. Do not leave part of the units switched to the opposite mode. Cooling only units should be switched off at the thermostat during the heating season. Gas or Electric Heating The unit is designed to heat a given amount of air while operating. If this amount of air is greatly reduced, approximately 1/3 during the heating season, the gas heat exchanger or electric heating coil may overheat, and may cut the burner or heater off entirely by action of the safety high temperature limit devices which are factory mounted at the heat exchanger and supply fan areas. Airflow should be adjusted after installation to obtain an air temperature rise within the range specified on the unit rating plate at the required external static pressure. Should overheating occur with a gas heat exchanger, or the gas supply fail to shut off, shut off the manual gas valve to the furnace before shutting off the electrical supply. Prolonged overheating of the heat exchanger will shorten its life. If unit has not been selected as a 100% outside air unit (makeup air unit) the return air duct must be sealed to the unit and the return air temperature must be maintained between 55 F and 80 F. Polyolester (POE) and Polyvinylether (PVE) oils are two types of lubricants used in hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigeration systems. Refer to the compressor label for the proper compressor lubricant type. CAUTION 28 Table 1 - Electric and Gas Heating Capacities Model Option B3 Gas Heat Electric Heat Input Capacity Output Capacity Capacity MBH MBH kW (208V) kW (230V, 380V, 460V, 575V) 1 = Heat 1 20 2 = Heat 2 40 3 = Heat 3 60 4 = Heat 4 80 5 = Heat 5 100 6 = Heat 6 120 Wiring Diagrams Unit specific wiring diagrams are laminated and affixed inside the controls compartment door. Condensate Drain Pan Unit requires drain traps to be connected to the condensate drain pan of the unit. The 11, 13, 16-25 and 30 ton units include one drain pan connection. Condensate drain pipe or p-trap for each connection is factory supplied and shipped loose in the controls compartment for field installation. See Installation section of this manual for more information. If codes require a condensate drain line, the line should be the same pipe size or larger than the drain connection, include a p-trap, and pitch downward toward drain. An air break should be used with long runs of condensate lines. Installation AAON equipment has been designed for quick and easy installation. Locating Units The curb should be mounted first and must be located so that duct connections will be clear of structural members of the building. Verify rooftop or foundation can support the total unit weight, including accessory weights. Unit should not be operated without a p-trap. Failure to install a p-trap may result in overflow of condensate water. CAUTION When locating gas fired units, it is recommended the unit be installed so that the flue discharge vents are located at least 120 inches away from any opening through which combustion products could enter the building. WARNING 29 Do not position flue opening to discharge into a fresh air intake of any other piece of equipment. Unit should also be installed so that the flow of combustion intake air is not obstructed from reaching the furnace. Vent opening must not be blocked by snow. A minimum 12 curb must be used or the vent outlet shall be greater than 12 off the ground/roof. Flue gas is dangerously hot and contains containments. The user is responsible for determining if vent gases may degrade building materials. The National Gas and Propane Installation Code, specifies a 6 ft. horizontal vent terminal clearance to gas and electric meters and relief devices. Local codes may supersede or further place restrictions on vent termination locations. Table 2 - C Cabinet Unit Clearances Location Unit Size 11, 13,16-25 and 30 tons Front - (Supply Air) 6 Back - (Outside Air)* 20 ** ***Left Side 6 Right Side 60 Top Unobstructed *Clearance is measured from the end of the outside air rain hood. **Units with an energy recovery wheel require 48 of clearance. ***Units with a water-cooled condenser or chilled water coil require 48 of clearance on the left side for service access. Figure 2 - RN Series C Cabinet, 11, 13, 16-25 and 30 Setting the Curb Make openings in roof decking large enough to allow for duct penetration and workspace only. Do not make openings larger than necessary. Set the curb to coincide with the openings. Make sure the curb is level. Unit must be level in both horizontal axes to support the unit and reduce noise and vibration. Distances from adjacent public walkways, adjacent buildings, operable windows and building openings, shall conform to local codes and/or the National Fuel Gas Code, ANSI 54, or the National Gas & Propane Code, CSA WARNING 30 Be careful to install the provided neoprene gasket according to the following figure prior to setting the unit on the curb. All roofing work should be performed by competent roofing contractors to avoid any possible leakage. CAUTION Where the supply or warm air duct passes through a combustible roof, a clearance of 1 inch must be maintained between the outside edges of the duct and combustible material in accordance with National Fire Protection Association Standard No. 90A. Provide flashings or enclosure between structure and roof and all joints must be sealed with mastic roofing to ensure a watertight seal. CAUTION 31 Forklifting the Unit (11, 13 and 16-30 ton) 11, 13 and 16-30 ton units can be lifted using a forklift. 11-25 and 30 ton units must have forks 72 in length or the forks must have 72 fork extensions. 11, 13, and 16-30 ton units with Energy Recovery wheels cannot be lifted using a forklift. Standard units can be lifted from all sides except the condenser side. Units with power exhaust can be lifted from the controls side or the access (right) side. Forks must be perpendicular to the unit and they must be in far enough that the back of the forks are no more than 6 away from the edge of the unit. Figure 3 - Forklifting an RN Series A, B and C Cabinet, 11, 13 and 16-30 ton tons Lifting the Unit If cables or chains are used to hoist the unit they must be the same length. Minimum cable length is 99 for 11, 13 and 16-30 ton units. Care should be taken to prevent damage to the cabinet, coils, and condenser fans. It is recommended to lift the unit with the outside air hood in the downward shipping position. However, the unit may be lifted with the outside air hood in the open position. Incorrect lifting can cause damage to the unit. CAUTION FORKLIFTING 11-25 AND 30 TON UNITS Forks or Fork Extensions must be 72 in length. CAUTION Forks 32 Before lifting unit, be sure that all shipping material has been removed from unit. Secure hooks and cables at all lifting points / lugs provided on the unit. Hoist unit to a point directly above the curb and duct openings. Be sure that the gasket material has been applied to curb. Carefully lower and align the unit with utility and duct openings. Lower the unit until the unit skirt fits around the curb. Some units are designed to overhang the curb. Take care that any recessed base rails fit around the curb. Make sure the unit is properly seated on the curb and is level. Figure 4 - Lifting Details of a 11, 13 and 16-30 ton tons ton Standard or Power Exhaust Unit Figure 5 - Lifting Details of a 11, 13 and 16-30 ton tons Energy Recovery Wheel or Power Return Unit 33 Duct Connection There to be a minimum of a 12 straight duct off of the supply duct with no size reduction and then a limitation of no more than a 45 transition for the next 24 , this is to insure proper performance of the heaters. Air quantity and temperature stagnation could still be effected depending on how branch take-offs are taken off the main supply plenum. Note: If outside air will be in contact with the air tunnel base of a C cabinet unit (11, 13 and 16-30 ton tons), the unit should include the base insulation option or the base must be field insulated. Do not drill or punch holes in the base of the unit, from inside the unit or from below the unit to attach ductwork. Leaking may occur if unit base is punctured. CAUTION 34 Figure 6 - Duct Connection 35 Outside Air Rain Hood Rain hood must be opened before startup of the unit. Fresh air intake adjustments should be made according to building ventilation of local code requirements. 11, 13 and 16-30 ton Units Remove the two screws at the bottom of the rain hood that secure it in the shipping position. Remove the screws that attach the side pieces of the hood to the top of the hood. Rotate the side pieces so that the holes along one edge line up with the holes on the top piece and the flange is on the inside of the rain hood. Attach the side pieces to the top of the hood using the provided screws and attached the side pieces to the end of the unit through the flange. Apply silicon caulking along the top and both sides of the rain hood. Take care to seal the top corners where the rain hood attaches to the unit. Figure 7 - 11, 13 and 16-30 ton Closed Rain Hood Figure 8 - 11, 13 and 16-30 ton Open Rain Hood In order to prevent water leakage into the roof curb, the factory provided sheet metal flashings MUST BE attached to the unit base to cover the shipping slots at both ends of the unit. CAUTION 36 Metal Mesh Filters (11, 13 and 16-30 ton) Metal mesh outside air filters require installation of the filter rack on the intake of the rain hood. Clips which hold the metal mesh filters in the filter rack should face outward. Figure 9 - Rain Hood with Metal Mesh Filter Rack Installation Electrical Verify the unit nameplate agrees with power supply. Connect power and control wiring to the unit as shown in Figure I12 and in the unit specific wiring diagram, which shows factory and field wiring and is attached to the inside of the door of the controls compartment. Electric shock hazard. Before attempting to perform any installation, service, or maintenance, shut off all electrical power to the unit at the disconnect switches. Unit may have multiple power supplies. Failure to disconnect power could result in dangerous operation, serious injury, death, or property damage. WARNING 37 Route power and control wiring, separately, through the utility entry in the base of the unit. Do not run power and control signal wires in the same conduit. The utility entry on 11, 13 and 16-30 ton units is located in the unit base in the front right hand corner of the unit (compressor compartment). See unit drawing for specific location. Figure 10 - Unit Utility Entry Figure 11 - Back View of Power Switch from Compressor and Control Compartment (11, 13 and 16-30 ton Units) Size supply conductors based on the unit MCA rating. Supply conductors must be rated a minimum of 75 C. Protect the branch circuit in accordance with code requirements. The unit must be electrically grounded in accordance with local codes, or in the absence of local codes, the current National Electric Code, ANSI/NFPA 70 or the current Canadian Electrical Code CSA Note: All units are factory wired for 208V, 230V, 380V, 460V, or 575V. The transformer configuration must be checked by a qualified technician prior to service, especially if unit is to be connected to a 208V or 230V supply. For 208V service interchange the yellow and red conductor on the low voltage control transformer. Red-Black for 208V Yellow-Black for 230V Wire power leads to the unit s terminal block or main disconnect. All wiring beyond this point has been completed by the manufacturer and cannot be modified without effecting the unit s agency/safety certification. Supply voltage must be within the min/max range shown on the unit nameplate. Available short circuit current should not exceed the short circuit current rating (SCCR) shown on the unit nameplate. Installing Contractor is responsible for proper sealing of the electrical and gas entries into the unit Failure to seal the entries may result in damage to the unit and property. CAUTION Three phase voltage imbalance will cause motor overheating and premature failure. CAUTION 38 Three phase voltage imbalance will cause motor overheating and premature failure. The maximum allowable imbalance is Voltage imbalance is defined as 100 times the maximum deviation from the average voltage divided by the average voltage. Example: (221V+230V+227V)/3 = 226V, then 100*(226V-221V)/226V = , which exceeds the allowable imbalance. Check voltage imbalance at the unit disconnect switch and at the compressor terminal. Contact your local power company for line voltage corrections. Installing contractor must check for proper motor rotation and check blower motor amperage listed on the motor nameplate is not exceeded. Motor overload protection may be a function of the variable frequency drive and must not be bypassed. Wire control signals to the unit s low voltage terminal block located in the controls compartment. If any factory installed wiring must be replaced, use a minimum 105 C type AWM insulated conductors. Thermostat Control Wiring If a thermostat is used for unit control, thermostat should be located on an inside wall 4-5 feet above the floor where it will not be subjected to drafts, sun exposure, or heat from electrical fixtures of appliances. Control wiring must deliver adequate voltage to components to assure proper operation. Control voltage returning from controller circuit must be a minimum of 21 VAC. To assure proper wiring use the following chart to determine the allowable wiring distances. Rotation must be checked on all MOTORS AND COMPRESSORS of three phase units. Supply fan, exhaust fan, return fan, and condenser fan motors should all be checked by a qualified service technician at startup and any wiring alteration should only be made at the unit power connection. CAUTION Scroll compressors are directional and will be damaged by operation in the wrong direction. Low pressure switches on compressors have been disconnected after factory testing. Rotation should be checked by a qualified service technician at startup using suction and discharge pressure gauges and any wiring alteration should only be made at the unit power connection. CAUTION No variable speed compressor shall operate below 35 Hz. Operating variable speed compressors outside the frequency range specified in this manual voids all warranties and may result in compressor failure. CAUTION 39 Table 3 - Control Wiring Wire Size (Stranded) - Copper Conductors Only Total Wire Distance Allowable 20 AWG 200 ft 18 AWG 350 ft 16 AWG 500 ft 14 AWG 750 ft 12 AWG 1250 ft Total Wire Distance Allowable = (Quantity of Control Wires) x (Control Wire Distance) Take the total wire distance allowable and divide by the quantity of wires to be connected. This indicates the distance allowable for that size wire. The wiring to the unit must not exceed the total wire distance allowable. If the voltage at the connectors is less than 21 VAC, isolation relays must be installed. If under external control 21 VAC must be field verified. All external devices must be powered via a separate external power supply. Example: A total of 8 wires must be pulled 75ft to a control the unit. What size wire should be used? According to the Table 3, 16 AWG allows for 63ft (500 ft/8 wires) and 14 AWG allows for 94ft (750 ft/8 wires). Thus, 14 AWG should be used. Gas Heating Verify the unit nameplate agrees with the proper gas supply type and amount. Gas piping must be installed in accordance with local codes, or in the absence of local codes, installation must conform to the current (United States) National Fuel Gas Code 54 or the current (Canada) National Fuel & Propane Installation Code CSA or Table 4 -11, 13, 16-25 and 30 ton Gas Connections Model Option B3 Input MBH Connections Quantity Size 1 270 1 3/4 NPT 2 405 1 NPT 3 540 FOR YOUR SAFETY Read the entire gas heating installation section of this manual before beginning installation of the gas heating section. If you do not follow these instructions exactly, a fire or explosion may result causing property damage, personal injury, or loss of life. WARNING 40 After verifying gas inlet pressure and manifold pressure the service technician must time the gas flow rate through the gas meter with a stopwatch to verify the gas input rate. Unit nameplate input rate value has been calculated at the altitude where the unit was shipped. Above 2,000 ft the input rate is adjusted 4% for every 1,000 ft. Figure 12 - RN Series Gas Heat Exchanger Table 5 - Natural Gas (ft3/hr) Maximum Piping Capacities Specific Gravity = , Supply Pressure psi, Pressure Drop = Pipe Size Length of Pipe 20 ft 50 ft. 100 ft. 150 ft. 200 ft. 1/2 120 73 50 40 35 3/4 250 151 103 84 72 1 465 285 195 160 135 1-1/4 950 580 400 325 280 1-1/2 1460 900 620 500 430 2 2750 1680 1150 950 800 2-1/2 4350 2650 1850 1500 1280 Table 6 - Propane (kBtu/hr) Maximum Piping Capacities Specific Gravity = , Supply Pressure = 11 , Pressure Drop, Pipe Size Length of Pipe 20 ft 50 ft. 100 ft. 150 ft. 200 ft. 1/2 189 114 78 63 55 3/4 393 237 162 132 112 1 732 448 307 252 213 1-1/4 1496 913 630 511 440 1-1/2 2299 1417 976 787 675 2 4331 2646 1811 1496 1260 Do not use gas piping smaller than unit gas connections. Natural gas pipe runs longer than 20 feet and propane gas pipe runs longer than 50 feet may require a larger supply pipe than the unit connection size. Some utility companies may also require pipe sizes larger than the minimum sizes listed. 41 Piping Sizing Examples A 100 ft pipe run is needed for a 1080 MBH natural gas heater. The natural gas has a rating of 1000 Btu/ft3 and a specific gravity of (Obtain these values from the local gas supplier.) = BTUftMBH1000108031080 ft3/hr From the natural gas maximum capacities table, at 100 ft and 1080 ft3/hr the required minimum pipe size is 2 . A 100 ft pipe run is needed for a 270 MBH propane gas heater. 270 MBH = 270 kBtu/hr From the propane gas maximum capacities table, at 100 ft and 270 kBtu/hr the required minimum pipe size is 1 . Inlet and Manifold Pressures For natural gas units, the minimum inlet gas pressure to the unit is 6 and maximum inlet gas pressure to the unit is For propane units, the minimum inlet gas pressure to the unit is 11 and the maximum inlet gas pressure to the unit is 13 A field provided 1/8 NPT pressure tap is required to be installed in the piping just upstream of the shutoff valve for test gage connection to allow checking of the gas supply pressure at the unit. A factory installed pressure tap on the outlet end of the gas valve can be used to verify a manifold pressure of for natural gas, or for propane. Gas Pressure Regulator & Overpressure Protection Device A gas pressure regulator must be installed if natural gas supply pressure to the unit is greater than and less than 2 psi ( ) and if propane gas supply pressure is greater than 13 and less than 2 psi ( ). Regulators must comply with the latest edition of the Standard for Line Pressure Regulators, ANSI Both a gas pressure regulator and overpressure protection device (OPD) must be installed if gas supply pressure to the unit is greater than 2 psi ( ) and less than 5 psi ( ), in compliance with ANSI For proper heater operation, pressure to the regulator MUST NOT be greater than 5 psi ( ). Piping Supports Gas supply piping must be supported directly at the connection to the unit and at intervals listed in the following table with metal straps, blocks, or hooks. Piping should not be strained or bent. Table 7 - Gas Piping Supports Pipe Size Support Intervals 1/2 to 3/4 Every 6 ft 3/4 to 1 Every 8 ft 1-3/4 or Larger (Horizontal) Every 10 ft 1-1/4 or Larger (Vertical) Every Floor Heater should be disconnected from the gas supply piping during pressure testing of the supply piping system with pressures in excess of psi. Gas valves can be damaged if subjected to more than psi. CAUTION 42 Additional Gas Piping Considerations Local codes will usually require a field provided and installed manual main shutoff valve and union external to the unit. Main shutoff valve should be labeled. A drip leg should be installed near the unit connection to trap sediment and condensate. Pipe joint compounds used on all gas piping connections should be resistant to liquid petroleum gases. If flexible gas piping to the unit, or in the unit, must be replaced connectors cannot be reused, only new connectors may be used. Heat exchanger comes equipped with a condensate drain which should be plumbed to the appropriate drain according to the (United States) National Fuel Gas Code 54 or the current (Canada) National Fuel & Propane Installation Code CSA or , the International Building Code, and any applicable local and regional codes and regulations. The condensate drain connection is located next to the gas entry location. For 11, 13, 16-25 and 30, the heat exchanger condensate drain connection from the unit is a 5/8 barbed nylon elbow connection. Figure 13 - Example 11, 13, 16-25 and 30 ton through the Base Gas Piping 43 Leak Testing All components of gas supply system, including manual shut off valves and the piping in the interior of the unit, should be leak tested with a soap solution before operating the appliance and at least on an annual basis thereafter. All gas fired heat exchangers are completely tested at the factory before shipment. This will remove nearly all of the oils that have been used in the manufacturing process. However, trace amounts may remain. When performing the initial startup at the jobsite, it is highly recommended that people or any other living animals, which may be sensitive to the residual odors or gases, NOT be present in the conditioned space during the startup. In all cases, including the initial factory firing and testing, any of the gases will be under the acceptable level of concentration for human occupancy. Refrigerant-to-Water Heat Exchanger Condenser water pump, condenser water piping, cooling tower or geothermal loop, pressure gauges, strainers, piping insulation and all components of the waterside piping must be field installed. Water-Source Heat Pump Applications Water-source heat pump units using 100% outside air must have electric preheat if the application has a potential for operation with air entering the indoor coil below 43 F with a water loop temperature of 70 F. LEAK CHECK GAS PIPE The gas pipe in the unit should be checked for leaks before startup. Leak checking is the responsibility of the installing contractor. All connections should be checked for leaks annually after installation. Failure to leak check could result in fire, explosion, or other hazardous situations. DANGER Do not use open flame or other source of ignition for leak testing. Fire or explosion could result causing property damage, personal injury, or death. DANGER Some soaps used for leak detection can be corrosive to certain metals. Rinse piping thoroughly after leak test has been completed. CAUTION Those sensitive to odors or gases from trace amounts of residual oils should NOT be present in the conditioned space during the startup of a gas fired installation. WARNING 44 Open Loop Applications This product contains one or more refrigerant-to-water heat exchangers made of 316 Stainless Steel. 316 Stainless Steel is subject to severe corrosion and failure when exposed to chlorides. Do not allow water containing any form of chlorides to enter this heat exchanger. Common forms of chlorides include: 1. Sea water mist entering an open cooling tower system. 2. Contaminated makeup water containing salt water. 3. Disinfecting the water loop with solutions containing sodium hypochlorite. Chlorides will result in a premature failure of the condenser. Failure of the condenser as a result of chemical corrosion is excluded from coverage under AAON warranties and the heat exchanger manufacturer warranties. Failure of the condenser will allow water to enter the refrigerant circuit and will cause extensive damage to the refrigerant circuit components. Any damage to the equipment as a result of condenser failure from chemical corrosion due to the fluid in the condenser is excluded from coverage under AAON warranties and the heat exchanger manufacturer warranties. WATER-SOURCE HEAT PUMP APPLICATIONS Water-source heat pump units using 100% outside air must have electric preheat if the application has a potential for heat pump heating operation with air entering the indoor coil below 43 F with an entering water loop temperature of 70 F. CAUTION OPEN LOOP APPLICATIONS Failure of the condenser as a result of chemical corrosion is excluded from coverage under AAON Inc. warranties and the heat exchanger manufacturer s warranties. WARNING OPEN LOOP APPLICATIONS SMO 254 brazed plated refrigerant-to-water heat exchangers are recommended with all open loop applications. Failure to use a SMO 254 heat exchanger may result in premature failure of your system and possible voiding of the warranty. WARNING Cleaning the cooling tower or condenser water loop with harsh chemicals such as hydrochloric acid (muriatic acid), chlorine or other chlorides, can damage the refrigerant-to-water heat exchanger. Care should be taken to avoid allowing chemicals to enter the refrigerant-to-water heat exchanger. See Appendix A - Heat Exchanger Corrosion Resistance for more information. CAUTION 45 Freezing Water in the Heat Exchanger This product contains one or more refrigerant-to-water heat exchangers. A refrigerant-to-water heat exchanger contains refrigerant in one passage and water in another passage. Water is subject to freezing at 32 F. When water freezes in a heat exchanger significant forces are exerted on the components of the heat exchanger where the water is confined. Failure of the condenser due to freezing will allow water to enter the refrigerant circuit and will cause extensive damage to the refrigerant circuit components. Any damage to the equipment as a result of water freezing in the condenser is excluded from coverage under AAON warranties and the heat exchanger manufacturer warranties. Unit is capable of operating with Entering Water Temperatures (EWT) as low as 57 F, during the cooling mode, without the need for head pressure control. If the EWT is expected to be lower than 57 F or a more stable operation is desired, a factory provided head pressure control water valve option is available. Glycol solution should be used if ambient temperatures are expected to fall below freezing or if the loop entering water temperature to the unit is below 50 F while operating in the heating mode (heat pump units only). Adding glycol to condenser water causes an increase in pressure drop and also results in a decrease in unit performance. A minimum concentration of 20% glycol solution is recommended. Table 8 - Glycol Freezing Points % Glycol Ethylene Glycol Propylene Glycol 20 18 F 19 F 30 7 F 9 F 40 -7 F -6 F 50 -28 F -27 F Water loop piping runs through unheated areas or outside the building should be insulated. Water Piping Installing contractor must ensure a differential pressure switch or water flow switch is installed between the condenser water supply and return connections. This sensor provides a signal to the unit controller that water flow is present in the refrigerant-to-water heat exchanger and the unit can operate without damaging unit components. WATER FREEZING Failure of the condenser due to freezing will allow water to enter the refrigerant circuit and will cause extensive damage to the refrigerant circuit components. Any damage to the equipment as a result of water freezing in the condenser is excluded from coverage under AAON warranties and the heat exchanger manufacturer warranties. WARNING 46 Table 9 - Standard Brazed Plate Heat Exchanger Water Connections Model (RN-) Supply and Return Connection Size 011, 013, 016, 018, 020 1 1/2 NPT 025, 030 2 NPT Table 10 - SMO 254 Brazed Plate Heat Exchanger Water Connections Model (RN-) Supply and Return Connection Size 016, 018, 020, 025, 030 1 1/2 NPT Only use approved water pipe material. Avoid using galvanized material for water lines/fittings as the material is corrosive and may cause fouling of the water system. Condenser water pump must be field sized and installed between the cooling tower/geothermal loop and self-contained unit. System should be sized in accordance with the ASHRAE Handbook. Use engineering guidelines to maintain equal distances for supply and return piping and limit bend radiuses to maintain balance in the system. Balancing valves, permanent thermometers and gauges may be required. Before connection to the unit the condenser water system should be flushed to remove foreign material that could cause condenser fouling. Install a screen strainer with a minimum of 20 Mesh ahead of the condenser inlet to prevent condenser fouling and internal tube damage. Mineral content of the condenser water must be controlled. All makeup water has minerals in it and as the water is evaporated in the cooling tower, these minerals remain. As the mineral content of the water increases, the conductivity of the water increases. Field provided and installed water treatment program must be compatible with stainless steel, copper, aluminum, ABS plastic, and PVC. Batch feed processes should never be used as concentrated chemicals can cause corrosion. Never use hydrochloric acid (muriatic acid) or chlorine as it will corrode stainless steel. WATER PRESSURE Prior to connection of condensing water supply, verify water pressure is less than maximum pressure shown on unit nameplate. To prevent injury or death due to instantaneous release of high pressure water, relief valves should be field supplied on water piping. Supply water connection may require a backflow preventer to prevent supply makeup water from backing up into the public water system. WARNING WATER PIPING Follow national and local codes when installing water piping. Connections to the unit should incorporate vibration eliminators to reduce noise and vibration and shutoff valves to facilitate servicing. Supply and return water piping must be at least as large as the unit connections and larger depending on length of runs, rise and bends. CAUTION 47 NOTE: Ball valves should be installed in the condenser water supply and return lines for unit isolation and water flow balancing. All manual flow valves should be of the ball valve design. Globe or gate valves should not be used due to high pressure drops and poor throttling characteristics. Pressure and temperature ports are recommended in condenser water supply and return lines for system balancing. These openings should be 5 to 10 pipe diameters from the unit water connections. To allow for mixing and temperature stabilization, wells in the water piping should extend at least pipe diameter into the pipe. Piping systems should not exceed 10 ft/sec fluid velocity to ensure tube wall integrity and reduce noise. PVC (Polyvinyl Chloride) and CPVC (Chlorinated Polyvinyl Chloride) are vulnerable to attack by certain chemicals. Polyolester (POE) oils used with R-410A and other refrigerants, even in trace amounts, in a PVC or CPVC piping system will result in stress cracking of the piping and fittings and complete piping system failure. CAUTION Each heat exchanger is equipped with a refrigerant pressure relief device to relieve pressure should excessive condensing pressures (>675 psig) occur. Codes may require installing contractor to connect and route relief piping outdoors. The relief valve has a 5/8 male flare outlet connection. CAUTION Installing contractor is responsible for properly sizing and installing water system components. Improper fluid flow due to valves, piping, or improper pump operation may result in unacceptable unit operation and void warranty. CAUTION 48 Condensate Drain Piping 11, 13, 16-25 and 30 ton units are equipped with one condensate drain pan connection, on the right side of the unit, and are furnished with a p-trap for field installation. All drain connections must be used and individually trapped to ensure a minimum amount of condensate accumulation in the drain pans. ABS type cement should be used to join the drain pipe connections. Note: The drain pan connections are MPT fitting. Drainage of condensate directly onto the roof may be acceptable in certain areas, refer to local codes. If condensate is to drain directly onto the roof a small drip pad should be placed below the drain to protect the roof from possible damage. If condensate is piped into the building drainage system, the drain pipe should penetrate the roof external to the unit itself. The drain line should be pitched away from the unit at least 1/8 inch per foot. On longer runs an air break should be used to ensure proper drainage. Draw-through cooling coils will have a negative static pressure in the drain pan area. This will cause an un-trapped drain to back up due to air being pulled up through the condensate drain piping. Condensate drain trapping and piping should conform to all applicable governing codes. Unit should not be operated without a p-trap. Failure to install a p-trap may result in overflow of condensate water into the unit. CAUTION 49 Draw-Through Coils Figure 14 - Draw-Through Drain Trap The X dimension on the draw-through trap should be at least equal to the absolute value of the negative static pressure in the drain pan plus one inch. To calculate the static pressure at the drain pan add the pressure drops of all components upstream of the drain pan, including the cooling coil, and add the return duct static pressure. Include the dirt allowance pressure drop for the filters to account for the worst-case scenario. The height from top of the bottom bend of the trap to the bottom of the leaving pipe must be at least equal to one half of the X dimension. This ensures that enough water is stored in the trap to prevent losing the drain seal during unit startup Note: The absolute value of the fan inlet pressure will always be greater than or equal to the absolute value of the static pressure in the drain pan on draw-through units, so the fan inlet pressure is a safe value to use for the drain pan static pressure. Table 11 - Draw-Through Drain Trap Dimensions Draw-Through Drain Pan Pressure Trap Dimensions Negative Static X X/2 (inches of water) (inch) (inch) All condensate drain connections must be used. Drain pans are sloped towards connections. All condensate drains must be trapped individually before they are connected to a common line. CAUTION CAUTION 50 Heating Coils One or two row hot water and steam heating and preheating coils can be factory installed. All valve controls for heating operation are field supplied and field installed. Hot water and steam coil connections are spun copper tube. Water coils should not be subjected to entering air temperatures below 38 F to prevent coil freeze-up. If air temperature across the coil is going to be below this value, use a glycol solution to match the coldest air expected. Table 12 - Steam Coil Connection Sizes Model (RN-) Steam Coil Connection Size011, 013, 016-025 and 030 2 1/8 Table 13 - Hot Water Coil Connection Sizes Model (RN-) Hot Water Coil Connection Size011, 013 1 3/8 016, 018, 020, 025, 030 1 5/8 Chilled Water Coil Four or six row chilled water cooling coils can be factory installed. All valve controls for cooling operation are field supplied and field installed. Chilled water coil connections are spun copper tube. Table 14 - Chilled Water Coil Connection Sizes Model (RN-) Chilled Water Coil Connection Size 011, 013 1 5/8 016, 018, 020, 025, 030 2 1/8 Piping shall be in accordance with national and local codes. Pressure limiting devices, backflow preventers and all other safety requirements are the sole responsibility of the installing contractor. WARNING Installing Contractor is responsible for proper sealing of the water piping entries into the unit Failure to seal the entries may result in damage to the unit and property. CAUTION 51 Electric Preheat Figure 15 - Preheat Controller The electric preheat controller is factory installed within the preheat cabinet. The following details are for EHC1 version of the preheat controller. Status Display Screens These screens are access by pressing either the left or right controller buttons and scrolling through the following displays. 1. LAT - Measured leaving air temperature (LAT), average of LAT A and B probes. MOD - Modulation rate % currently being applied to stage one SCR. 2. WKGset - "Working" LAT setpoint ( F) (LATeet>>RESETset as adjusted by 0-10V RESET signal). 3. LATset - Leaving air temperature ( F) control setpoint. 4. RESETset - "Reset" air temperature ( F) control setpoint. 5. OATset - Outside air temperature ( F) control setpoint, measured outside temperature must be less to enable preheat. Flash Code LED Screen Controller Buttons 52 6. LLTset - Low Limit Time temperature ( F) setpoint. If this temperature is not reached at full output, relay will pull in. 7. Stage - Current operating stage 1-6. 8. Stage - Current operating stage 1-6. MOD - Modulation rate % being applied to stage one heat strip SCR. 9. OAT - Outside air inlet temperature ( F). 10. LATA - Leaving air probe "A" temperature ( F). 11. LATB - Leaving air probe "B" temperature ( F). 12. ManSTG - Manual override stage for system testing. Any override automatically cancels after ten minutes; 0 indicates normal operation, 1-6 corresponds to stages 1-6 being forced on. Stage 1, the SCR, is forced to 50%. System Setting Screens These screens are access by pressing the up button and then entering the technician password 2425. The screens are scrolled through by pressing either right or left buttons on the controller. Adjustment is made by pressing the up and down buttons. After a short time of inactivity, the screen will go back to the Status Display Screens. 1. StartDly - Seconds of delay after the 'Enable' call before heating starts. This is to allow the Supply Fan to come up to speed. Supply Fan VFD s have a 45 second ramp up time. Range = 1sec-60sec, and the default is 15sec. 53 2. BelowLLT - "Below Low Limit Time". Range = 10sec-1800sec, and the default is 10sec. If LLTset temperature is not reached within BelowLLT after reaching full output, the status relay will operate. 3. Stages - Number of stages. Range = 1-6, and the default is 1. The number of stages can be determined using Table 15. Table 15 - Stages of Electric Preheat Tonnages Feature 14B Stages C Cabinet RN 11, 13, 16-25 and 30 tons A= 10 kW 1 B= 20 kW C = 30 kW 2 D = 40 kW E = 50 kW 3 F = 60 kW G = 70 kW 4 H = 80 kW J = 90 kW 5 K = 100 kW L = 110 kW 6 M = 120 kW 4. LATset - Leaving air temperature setpoint. Range = 35 F-80 F, and the default is 50 F. 5. OATset - Outside air temperature setpoint. Range = 35 F-60 F, and the default is 35 F. 6. LLTset - Low Limit Time temperature setpoint. Range = 35 F-50 F, and the default is 35 F. If LLTSet temperature is not reached within BelowLLT time after reaching full output, the status relay will operate. 7. RESETset - Reset Setpoint temperature. Range = 35 F-80 F, and the default is 50 F. 8. ManSTG - Temporary manual override a specified stage testing, 0=normal operation, 1-6 to override corresponding stages. Range = 0-6, and the default is 0. The manual override may be used for unit testing of each stage. Stage 1 will be at 50% to test SCR and stages 2-6 will be full capacity. A manual override will expire in ten minutes if not manually cancelled by resetting ManSTG back to zero. 54 LED Flash Alarm Codes The flashing red LED will be to the right of the screen. The number of blinks is described below. The LCD screen will also display the screens. 1 = LATA probe open/short 2 = LATB probe open/short 3 = OAT sensor open/short 4 = Leaving air temp over limit 5 = Cooling down after hi limit event 6 = LAT below low limit 7 = Stage 1 only recovery after mechanical limit 8 = Shutdown after too many hi limit events 9 = Short or overload on the 0-10VDC analog signal output Operation Controller receives 24VAC preheat enable Controller evaluates if outside air temperature OAT is below setpoint OATset If OAT < OATset , controller will delay heating startup by time setpoint STARTDLY , then stage up preheat to maintain the setpoint LATset to a maximum number of stages set in setpoint Stages . 55 If a safety is reached with the controller s safety sensors then the electric preheat will be de-energized for a period of 2 minutes. Electric preheat will turn on stage one at 100% for 3 minutes to test if fault conditions still exist after the cool down period. The controller will repeat this and if 3 trips are recorded in 60 minutes then the controller will lockout and require manually cycling power to reset. The modulating electric preheat option is designed to temper the incoming outside air to the unit based on an enable control signal and the outside air conditions. A 24VAC enable signal must be provided to the [PHE] terminal to enable the operation of the electric preheat. Once the preheat controller is enabled it will monitor the outside air temperature to determine if any capacity of preheat is needed. If the outside air temperature falls below the outside air temperature setpoint the electric preheat will be started up and maintain the leaving air temperature setpoint with both SCR controlled and staged electric preheat. Both setpoints are set with push button LCD interface on the preheat controller. Outside air temperature sensors and preheat discharge supply air temperature sensors are factory installed and wired to the preheat controller. Electric preheat has maximum operating outside air temperature of 60 F and a maximum preheat discharge air temperature of 80 F. [COM], [PHO] & [PHC] feedback terminals are provided to communicate if the electric preheat is in operation. PHO is a normally open contact, PHC is a normally closed contact, and COM is the common. These terminals are not required to be connected. [PHE] is the electric preheat operation enable. [PH+] and [PH-] are the preheat set point reset terminals. Energy Recovery Units General Information AAONAIRE units have been equipped with an energy recovery wheel. This section is provided to assure the energy recovery feature will be properly setup to perform in accordance with the job specifications for your particular application. Energy Recovery Wheel The Energy Recovery Cassette consists of a frame wheel, wheel drive system, and energy transfer segments. Segments are removable for cleaning or replacement. The segments rotate through counter flowing exhaust and outdoor air supply streams where they transfer heat and/or water vapor from the warm, moist air stream to the cooler and/or drier air stream. The initial setup and servicing of the energy recovery wheel is very important to maintain proper operation efficiency and building occupant comfort. Improper installation, adjustment, alteration, service or maintenance can cause property damage, personal injury or loss of life. Startup and service must be performed by a Factory Trained Service Technician. WARNING 56 Normal maintenance requires periodic inspection of filters, the cassette wheel, drive belts, air seals, wheel drive motor, and its electrical connections. Wiring diagrams are provided with each motor. When wired according to wiring diagram, motor rotates clockwise when viewed from the shaft/pulley side. By carefully reviewing the information within this section and following the instructions, the risk of improper operation and/or component damage will be minimized. It is important that periodic maintenance be performed to help assure trouble free operation. Initial Mechanical Check and Setup Outdoor units equipped with outside air intake will have an outside air hood. The outside air hood must be opened prior to unit operation. Outdoor air intake adjustments should be made according to building ventilation, or local code requirements. After the unit installation is complete, open the cassette access door and determine that the energy wheel rotates freely when turned by hand. Apply power and observe that the wheel rotates at approximately 30 RPM. If the wheel does not rotate when power is applied, it may be necessary to readjust the diameter air seals . Air Seal Adjustments Pile type air seals across both sides of the energy wheel diameter are factory adjusted to provide close clearance between the air seal and wheel. Racking of the unit or cassette during installation, and/or mounting of the unit on a non-level support or in other than the factory orientation can change seal clearances. Tight seals will prevent rotation. Cross Section of Air Seal Structure Wheel to Air Seal Clearance To check wheel to seal clearance; first disconnect power to the unit, in some units the energy recovery wheel assembly can be pulled out from the cabinet to view the air seals. On larger units, the energy recovery wheel may be accessible inside the walk-in cabinet. A business card or two pieces of paper can be used as a feller gauge, (typically each .004 thick) by placing it between the face of the wheel and pile seal. Using the paper, determine if a loose slip fit exist between the pile seal and wheel when the wheel is rotated by hand. To adjust air seal clearance, loosen all seal plate retaining screws holding the separate seal retaining plates to the bearing support channels and slide the seals plates away from the wheel. Using the paper feeler gauge, readjust and retighten one seal plate at a time to provide slip fit clearance when the wheel is rotated by hand. Confirm that the wheel rotates freely. Apply power to the unit and confirm rotation. 57 Airflow Balancing and Checking High performance systems commonly have complex air distribution and fan systems. Unqualified personnel should not attempt to adjust fan operation, or air circulation, as all systems have unique operations characteristics. Professional air balance specialists should be employed to establish actual operating conditions, and to configure the air delivery system for optimal performance. Controls A variety of controls and electrical accessories may be provided with the equipment. Identify the controls on each unit by consulting appropriate submittal, or order documents, and operate according to the control manufacturer s instructions. If you cannot locate installation, operation, or maintenance information for the specific controls, then contact your sales representative, or the control manufacturer for assistance. Routine Maintenance and Handling Handle cassettes with care. All cassettes should be lifted by the bearing support beam. Holes are provided on both sides of the bearing support beams to facilitate rigging as shown in the following illustration. Lifting Hole Locations Routine maintenance of the Energy Recovery Cassettes includes periodic cleaning of the Energy Recovery Wheel as well as inspection of the Air Seals and Wheel Drive Components as follows: Cleaning The need for periodic cleaning of the energy recovery wheel will be a function of operating schedule, climate and contaminants in the indoor air being exhausted and the outdoor air being supplied to the building. The energy recovery wheel is self-cleaning with respect to dry particles due to its laminar flow characteristics. Smaller particles pass through; larger particles land on the surface and are blown clear as the flow direction is reversed. Any material that builds up on the face of the wheel can be removed with a brush or vacuum. The primary need for cleaning is to remove oil based aerosols that have condensed on energy transfer surfaces. A characteristic of all dry desiccants, such films can close off micron sized pores at the surface of the desiccant material, reducing the efficiency by which the desiccant can Do not alter factory wiring. Deviation from the supplied wiring diagram will void all warranties, and may result in equipment damage or personal injury. Contact the factory with wiring discrepancies. WARNING 58 adsorb and desorb moisture and also build up so as to reduce airflow. In a reasonably clean indoor environment such as a school or office building, measurable reductions of airflow or loss of sensible (temperature) effectiveness may not occur for several years. Measurable changes in latent energy (water vapor) transfer can occur in shorter periods of time in applications such as moderate occupant smoking or cooking facilities. In applications experiencing unusually high levels of occupant smoking or oil based aerosols such as industrial applications involving the ventilation of machine shop areas for example, annual washing of energy transfer may be necessary to maintain latent transfer efficiency. Proper cleaning of the energy recovery wheel will restore latent effectiveness to near original performance. To clean, gain access to the energy recovery wheel and remove segments. Brush foreign material from the face of the wheel. Wash the segments or small wheels in a 5% solution of non-acid based coil cleaner or alkaline detergent and warm water. Soak in the solution until grease and tar deposits are loosened (Note: some staining of the desiccant may remain and is not harmful to performance). Before removing, rapidly run finger across surface of segment to separate polymer strips for better cleaning action. Rinse dirty solution from segment and remove excess water before reinstalling in wheel. Air Seals Four adjustable diameter seals are provided on each cassette to minimize transfer of air between the counter flowing airstreams. To adjust diameter seals, loosen diameter seal adjusting screws and back seals away from wheel surface. Rotate wheel clockwise until two opposing spokes are hidden behind the bearing support beam. Using a folded piece of paper as a feeler gauge, position paper between the wheel surface and diameter seals. Adjust seals towards wheel surface until a slight friction on the feeler gauge (paper) is detected when gauge is moved along the length of the spoke. Retighten adjusting screws and recheck clearance with feeler gauge. Wheel Drive Components The wheel drive motor bearings are pre-lubricated and no further lubrication is necessary. The wheel drive pulley is secured to the drive motor shaft by a combination of either a key or D slot and set screw. The set screw is secured with removable locktite to prevent loosening. Annually confirm set screw is secure. The wheel drive belt is a urethane stretch belt designed to provide constant tension through the life of the belt. No adjustment is required. Inspect the drive belt annually for proper tracking and tension. A properly tensioned belt will turn the wheel immediately after power is applied with no visible slippage during start-up. Do not use acid based cleaners, aromatic solvents, steam or temperatures in excess of 170 F; damage to the wheel may occur! CAUTION 59 Installation Considerations Energy recovery cassettes are incorporated within the design of packaged units, packaged air handlers and energy recovery ventilators. In each case, it is recommended that the following considerations be addressed: Accessibility The cassette and all its operative parts; : motor, belt, pulley, bearings, seals and energy transfer segments must be accessible for service and maintenance. This design requires that adequate clearance be provided outside the enclosure. Where cassettes are permanently installed in a cabinet, access to both sides of the cassette must be provided. Orientation & Support The Energy Recovery Cassette may be mounted in any orientation. However, Care must be taken to make certain that the cassette frame remains flat and the bearing beams are not racked. Avoid Racking of Cassette Frame To verify, make certain that the distance between wheel rim and bearing beam is the same at each end of the bearing beam, to within 1/4 of an inch (dimension A & B). This amount of racking can be compensated for by adjusting the diameter seals. If greater than 1/4 inch (dimension C), racking must be corrected to ensure that drive belt will not disengage from wheel. B CA Bearing beams shown racked Frame Wheel Bearing beams (2) Flat surface 60 Operation Startup Procedure 1. By hand, turn wheel clockwise (as viewed from the pulley side), to verify wheel turns freely through 360 rotation. 2. Before applying power to drive motor, confirm wheel segments are fully engaged in wheel frame and segment retainers are completely fastened. (See Segment Installation Diagram). 3. With hands and objects away from moving parts, activate unit and confirm wheel rotation. Wheel rotates clockwise (as viewed from the pulley side). 4. If wheel has difficulty starting, turn power off and inspect for excessive interference between the wheel surface and each of the four (4) diameter seals. To correct, loosen diameter seal adjusting screws and back adjustable diameter seals away from surface of wheel, apply power to confirm wheel is free to rotate, then re-adjust and tighten hub and diameter seals, as shown in hub seal adjustment diagram. 5. Start and stop wheel several times to confirm seal adjustment and to confirm belt is tracking properly on wheel rim (approximately 1/4 from outer edge of rim). Diameter Seal Adjustment Hub Seal Adjustment Service Keep hands away from rotating wheel! Contact with rotating wheel can cause physical injury. CAUTION Disconnect electrical power before servicing energy recovery cassette. Always keep hands away from bearing support beam when installing or removing segments. Failure to do so could result in severe injury to fingers or hand. CAUTION 61 Segment Installation & Replacement Wheel segments are secured to the wheel frame by a Segment Retainer which pivots on the wheel rim and is held in place by a Segment Retaining Catch. Segment Retainer To install wheel segments follow steps one through five below. Reverse procedure for segment removal. 1. Unlock two segment retainers (one on each side of the selected segment opening. 2. With the embedded stiffener facing the motor side, insert the nose of the segment between the hub plates. Segment Installation 3. Holding segment by the two outer corners, press the segment towards the center of the wheel and inwards against the spoke flanges. If hand pressure does not fully seat the segment, insert the flat tip of a screw driver between the wheel rim and outer corners of the segment and apply downward force while guiding the segment into place. 4. Close and latch each Segment Retainer under Segment Retaining Catch. 5. Slowly rotate the wheel 180 . Install the second segment opposite the first for counterbalance. Rotate the two installed segments 90 to balance the wheel while the third segment is installed. Rotate the wheel 180 again to install the fourth segment opposite the third. Repeat this sequence with the remaining four segments. Wheel Drive Motor and Pulley Replacement 1. Disconnect power to wheel drive motor. 2. Remove belt from pulley and position temporarily around wheel rim. 3. Loosen set screw in wheel drive pulley using a hex head wrench and remove pulley from motor drive shaft. 4. While supporting weight of drive motor in one hand, loosen and remove (4) mounting bolts. 5. Install replacement motor with hardware kit supplied. 6. Install pulley to dimension as shown and secure set screw to drive shaft. 7. Stretch belt over pulley and engage in groove. 8. Follow start-up procedure. Belt Replacement 1. Obtain access to the pulley side bearing access plate if bearing access plates are provided. Remove two bearing access plate retaining screws and the access plate. 2. Using hexagonal wrench, loosen set screw in bearing locking collar. Using light 62 hammer and drift (in drift pin hole) tap collar in the direction of wheel rotation to unlock collar. Remove collar. 3. Using socket wrench with extension, remove two nuts which secure bearing housing to the bearing support beam. Slide bearing from shaft. If not removable by hand, use bearing puller. 4. Form a small loop of belt and pass it through the hole in the bearing support beam. Grasp the belt at the wheel hub and pull the entire belt down. Note: Slight hand pressure against wheel rim will lift weight of wheel from inner race of bearing to assist bearing removal and installation. 5. Loop the trailing end of the belt over the shaft (belt is partially through the opening). 6. Reinstall the bearing onto the wheel shaft, being careful to engage the two locating pins into the holes in the bearing support beam. Secure the bearing with two self-locking nuts. 7. Install the belts around the wheel and pulley according to the instructions provided with the belt. 8. Reinstall diameter seals or hub seal and tighten retaining screws. Rotate wheel in clockwise direction to determine that wheel rotates freely with slight drag on seals. 9. Reinstall bearing locking collar. Rotate collar by hand in the direction the wheel rotates (see label provided on each cassette for wheel rotation). 10. Lock in position by tapping drift pin hole with hammer and drift. Secure in position by tightening set screw. 11. Reinstall Bearing Access Cover. 12. Apply power to wheel and ensure that the wheel rotates freely without interference. Belt Replacement Protect hands and belt from possible sharp edges of hole in Bearing Support Beam. CAUTION 63 Startup (See back of the manual for startup form.) During startup, it is necessary to perform routine checks on the performance of the unit. This includes checking the air flow, air filters, condenser water flow, dampers, heaters, and refrigerant charge. Supply Fans RN Series units are equipped with direct drive backward curved plenum fan assemblies that are selected to deliver the air volume specified according to unit size and job requirements. This is either done with air volume bands in the blower wheels or with variable frequency drives. Field airflow adjustment may be required at startup. Air volume bands for the wheels are sized according to the unit s air delivery specifications and can also be ordered from the factory for field installation. Wheels come standard with a 10% air volume band, as a safety factor, in case additional air volume is required from the unit. Air Flow Adjustment If reduced air volume is required an air volume band or larger air volume band can be installed within the blower wheel to reduce the amount of air delivered by the wheel. If the unit is factory equipped with the air volume band and additional air volume is required, the band can be removed from the wheel. Use fan program in AAON ECat to determine the new band size for the required cfm and static pressure. The following photos of a wheel are provided for practical guidelines only in order to identify the air band location in the wheel. Actual field installation of the air band into the wheel will require access into and through the blower wheel venture, which may require removal of the blower motor and wheel. Air volume bands are made of aluminum, sized and equipped with easy bend tabs that are to be inserted into pre-punched slots provided on the wheel. Once the band has been inserted into the slots, it MUST BE secured by bending the tabs over from the back side of the wheel and also MUST BE secured from the inside by connecting the ends together with a pop-rivet in the holes provided on the ends of the band. If the band is field installed, a hand held pop-rivet tool is recommended for connecting the band ends together. Caution must be taken to assure that the band is tightly installed and no damage, denting or alteration to the wheel or blades occurs during the installation. Improper installation, adjustment, alteration, service or maintenance can cause property damage, personal injury or loss of life. Startup and service must be performed by a Factory Trained Service Technician. WARNING Electric shock hazard. Shut off all electrical power to the unit to avoid shock hazard or injury from rotating parts. WARNING 64 Figure 16 - Supply Fan Banding For single set screw applications, tighten the set screw to the required torque setting (Table 16) using a calibrated torque wrench. For double set screw applications, tighten one set screw to half of the required torque setting (Table 16) using a calibrated torque wrench. Tighten the second set screw to the full required torque setting then tighten the first set screw to the full required torque setting. Table 16 - Plenum Fan Set Screw Specifications SET SCREW DIAMETER TORQUE (IN-LBS) 1/4" 80 5/16" 126 3/8" 240 65 The gap tolerances that are allowed between the blower and the inlet cone for the plenum fan blowers are shown in Figure 17. The inlet cone can be moved as necessary to center the cone in relation to the blower. The blower can be moved on the motor shaft to set the correct overlap. These tolerances are critical to the performance of the blower. Figure 17 - Plenum Fan Gap Tolerances Power Return Axial Flow Fans (16-25 and 30 tons) Blade Pitch Angle Setting Instructions Step 1: Determine the new required pitch for the fan blades Use the fan program in AAON ECat. Step 2: Maintain the balance of fan Mark the HUB/RET castings across a single joint, so the fan can be reassembled in the same orientation. Mark the location of any balancing weight. Balancing weight will be on the outer bolt circle, in the form of washers, and/or longer bolts, or an additional balancing nut. Number the blades and blade sockets, so that they can be replaced into their original positions. Figure 18 - Fan with the HUB on the Top and RET on the Bottom Step 3: Determine the direction of rotation Right, R, is clockwise when facing the discharge side of the fan and Left, L, is counterclockwise when facing the discharge side of the fan. Bushing Mount 66 Step 4: Determine the bushing mount location The bushing mount is the center section of the hub through which the fan is mounted to the shaft, and typically contains either setscrews or a center-tapered hole where the bushing inserts. Location A is with the bushing mount on air inlet side of the fan. Location B is with the bushing mount on air discharge side of the fan. Figure 19 - Bushing Mount Location Step 5: Determine the pin location groove Disassemble fan on a flat surface and note in which groove the pin is located. Figure 20 - RET with Pin in Groove 4 Step 6: Determine whether the pin is in the HUB or RET Figure 21 - Fan HUB and RET Castings A B Bushing Mount Bushing Bushing 1 2 3 4 67 Step 7: Determine the current blade pitch and the pin location for the new blades Table 17 - Pin Location Type Bushing Mount Blade Pitch Angle 20 25 28 30 33 35 38 40 45 50 5Z A - RET - RET RET RET HUB HUB HUB HUB B - HUB - HUB HUB HUB RET RET RET RET Table 18 - Pin Groove Location Type Rot. Blade Pitch Angle 20 25 28 30 33 35 38 40 45 50 5Z R - 4 - 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 L - 1 - 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 Step 8: Replace fan blades in the new pin location and reassemble the fan Replace the blades with the pin in the 1, 2, 3, or 4 groove position of either the HUB or RET. Assemble the fan making sure to place the blades in their previous blade sockets, to match up the previous orientation of HUB and RET and to replace any balancing weights in their previous locations. Tighten bolts in a cross pattern to 5-6 ft-lbs. of torque. Filters Do not operate the unit without filters in place. Unit should be checked for correct filter placement during startup. Operation of the equipment without filters will result in a clogged evaporator coil. Before completing startup and leaving the unit a complete operating cycle should be observed to verify that all components are functioning properly. CAUTION 68 Adjusting Refrigerant Charge Adjusting the charge of a system in the field must be based on determination of liquid sub-cooling and evaporator superheat. On a system with a TXV liquid sub-cooling is more representative of the charge than evaporator superheat but both measurements must be taken. Before Charging Unit being charged must be at or near full load conditions before adjusting the charge. Units equipped with hot gas reheat must be charged with the hot gas reheat valves closed while the unit is in cooling mode to get the proper charge. After charging, unit should be operated in reheat (dehumidification) mode to check for correct operation. Units equipped with heat pump options should be charged in heating mode to get the proper charge. After charging, unit should be operated in cooling mode to check for correct charge. Charge may need to be adjusted for cooling mode. If adjustments are made in the cooling mode heating mode must be rerun to verify proper operation. After adding or removing charge the system must be allowed to stabilize, typically 10-15 minutes, before making any other adjustments. The type of unit and options determine the ranges for liquid sub-cooling and evaporator superheat. Refer to the table below when determining the proper sub-cooling. Checking Liquid Sub-Cooling Measure the temperature of the liquid line as it leaves the condenser coil. Read the gauge pressure at the liquid line close to the point where the temperature was taken. You must use liquid line pressure as it will vary from discharge pressure due to condenser coil pressure drop. Convert the pressure obtained to a saturated temperature using the appropriate refrigerant temperature-pressure chart. Subtract the measured liquid line temperature from the saturated temperature to determine the liquid sub-cooling. Compare calculated sub-cooling to the table below for the appropriate unit type and options. Checking Evaporator Superheat Measure the temperature of the suction line close to the compressor. Read gauge pressure at the suction line close to the compressor. Convert the pressure obtained to a saturated temperature using the appropriate refrigerant temperature-pressure chart. Subtract the saturated temperature from the measured suction line temperature to determine the evaporator superheat. Compare calculated superheat to the table below for the appropriate unit type and options. The Clean Air Act of 1990 bans the intentional venting of refrigerant (CFC s and HCFC s) as of July 1, 1992. Approved methods of recovery, recycling or reclaiming must be followed. Fines and/or incarceration may be levied for non-compliance. CAUTION 69 Table 19 - Acceptable Refrigeration Circuit Values Air-Cooled Heat Pump Sub-Cooling 12-18 F Sub-Cooling with Hot Gas Reheat 15-22 F Superheat 8-15 F Water-Cooled Source Heat Pump Sub-Cooling 4-8 F Superheat 8-15 F Adjusting Sub-cooling and Superheat Temperatures The system is overcharged if the sub-cooling temperature is too high and the evaporator is fully loaded (low loads on the evaporator result in increased sub-cooling) and the evaporator superheat is within the temperature range as shown in the table above (high superheat results in increased sub-cooling). Correct an overcharged system by reducing the amount of refrigerant in the system to lower the sub-cooling. The system is undercharged if the superheat is too high and the sub-cooling is too low Correct an undercharged system by adding refrigerant to the system to reduce superheat and raise sub-cooling. If the sub-cooling is correct and the superheat is too high, the TXV may need adjustment to correct the superheat. Thermal expansion valve must be adjusted to approximately 8-15 F of suction superheat. Failure to have sufficient superheat will damage the compressor and void the warranty. CAUTION DO NOT OVERCHARGE! Refrigerant overcharging leads to excess refrigerant in the condenser coils resulting in elevated compressor discharge pressure. CAUTION 70 Table 20 - R-410A Refrigerant Temperature-Pressure Chart PSIG PSIG PSIG PSIG PSIG ( F) R-410A ( F) R-410A( F)R-410A( F)R-410A( F)R-410A 20 50 80 21 51 81 22 52 82 23 53 83 24 54 84 25 55 85 26 56 86 27 57 87 28 58 88 29 59 89 30 60 90 31 61 91 32 62 92 33 63 93 34 64 94 35 65 95 36 66 96 37 67 97 38 68 98 39 69 99 40 70 41 71 42 72 43 73 44 74 45 75 46 76 47 77 48 78 49 79 71 Gas Heater Instructions Figure 22 - Gas Heater Instructions 72 Condenser Fan Electronically Commutated Motor (ECM) Startup The fan cycling option uses a fan cycle switch to switch between one of the discrete speed inputs (see Table 21) on the motor thus cycling between two preset speeds based upon discharge pressure of the unit. By connecting 24VAC to a single or combination of the yellow, white, or orange wires, the motor will run at the discrete speeds in Table 21. With Customer Provided Unit Controls or WattMaster Unit Controls the WattMaster Condenser Head Pressure Module is used for variable speed control of the motor to maintain a head pressure. The motor should be factory wired to the PWM outputs of the WattMaster Condenser Head Pressure Module. See WattMaster literature for further information. ( ) With JENEsys Unit Controls the controller modulates the ECM to maintain head pressure. Note High voltage wires out of the motor: Black & Brown - 1 Phase Line Voltage Green - Ground Low control voltage wires out of the motor: Blue - Common Yellow - Variable Speed Control Table 21 - ECM Condenser Fan Cycling Options Color Terminal Customer Connection Option 1 Option 2 Option 3 Option 4 Option 5 Black BWS L1 208-230 VAC 208-230 VAC 208-230 VAC 208-230 VAC 208-230 VAC Brown BWS L2 208-230 VAC 208-230 VAC 208-230 VAC 208-230 VAC 208-230 VAC Green #10 EYELET Ground GND GND GND GND GND Blue BWS Common Common 24 VAC 24 VAC 24 VAC 24 VAC Yellow BWS Signal PWM 24 VAC 24 VAC White BWS Signal 24 VAC 24 VAC Orange BWS Signal 24 VAC 24 VAC RPM 300-1100 300 500 850 1100 RotationCCW CCW CCW CCW CCW ECM Toolbox IDVariable Speed 4 Speed 3 Speed 2 Speed 1 20% PWM RPM300 100% PWM RPM1100 73 VFD Controlled Condenser Fan Startup With Customer Provided Unit Controls the VFD s are factory provided and factory programmed. VFD s receives input from pressure transducers on each refrigerant circuit and vary the fan speed based on the pressure inputs to maintain a discharge (head) pressure. Standard pressure setpoint is 340 psi for standard air-cooled systems and 400 psi for modulating hot gas reheat air-cooled systems. With WattMaster Unit Controls the WattMaster Condenser Head Pressure Module is used to maintain a discharge pressure. The VFD should be factory wired to the outputs of the WattMaster Condenser Head Pressure Module. See WattMaster literature for additional information. ( ). With JENEsys Unit Controls the controller directly modulates the VFD to maintain a discharge pressure. 74 Adjustable Fan Cycling Switch Procedure To adjust the fan cycle switch you will need a flathead screwdriver. Recommended Settings The switch will come factory set to cut-in at 425psi (+/ 5psi) and a differential of 155psi (or open at 270psi (+/ 5psi)). Settings for CUT IN and DIFFERENTIAL PRESSURE are indicated with two slider gauges. Each adjustment screw sits above the setting that it controls. Cut InDifferential 75 To lower the pressure set point for the CUT IN gauge, turn the adjustable screw clockwise. To raise the pressure set point for the CUT IN gauge, turn the adjustable screw counter clockwise. To raise the pressure set point for the DIFFERENTIAL Gauge, turn the adjustable screw clockwise. To lower the pressure set point for the DIFFERENTIAL Gauge, turn the adjustable screw counter clockwise. NOTE: The pressure values on the gauge should be verified with gauges on the refrigerant line. The gauge scale is for illustration purposes only. Cut In Gauge Cut In Gauge Differential Gauge Differential Gauge 76 Operation Unit operations should be controlled with thermostat, or unit controller, never at the main power supply, except for servicing, emergency, or complete shutdown of the unit. Thermostat Operation Heating Thermostat system switch - "Heat" Thermostat fan switch - "Auto" or "On" Thermostat temperature set to desired point. Cooling Thermostat system switch - "Cool" Thermostat fan switch - "Auto" or "On" Thermostat temperature set to desired point. Air Circulation Thermostat system switch - "Off" Thermostat fan switch - "Auto" or "On" No change of the thermostat temperature. With these settings, the supply blower will run continuously but the supply air will not be heated, cooled, or dehumidified. System Off Thermostat system switch - "Off" Thermostat fan switch - "Auto" No change of the thermostat temperature. With these settings the system is shut down, with the exception of control system power. Night and Weekend Unoccupied Operation To reduce the operating time of the unit when the space is unoccupied, such as nights and weekends, it is recommended that the temperature setting be raised about 5 F while unoccupied during the cooling season and lowered about 10 F during the heating season. 77 Packaged DX Cooling Operation and Control When a call for cooling (G and Y1, Y2, etc.) is made the supply blower motors and compressors will energize. Gas Heater Operation When heat (G and W1, W2, etc.) is called for the combustion motor starts and the ignition control is energized. The control sends 24 VAC to the main gas valve and high voltage to the igniter. If a burner flame has been detected within 10 seconds, the spark is extinguished and the flame continues. If a flame has not been detected after 10 seconds, the gas valve closes, the spark ceases and the induced draft blower continues to purge the heat exchanger. After 45 seconds of purge, the ignition system will attempt to light the burners again. Should no flame be detected after 3 tries, the ignition control will lock out the system. Power to the ignition control must be cycled to reset the heater control. On a fault the gas train is shut down by a main limit located in the heat exchanger area or by an auxiliary limit mounted in the supply fan compartment. Electric Heating Operation When a call for heating (G and W1, W2, etc.) is made the supply blower motors and electric resistance heaters will energize. Heating is accomplished by passing electrical current through a specified amount of resistance heaters which will produce the required heat. On a fault condition the main limit located in the supply air or the auxiliary limit located downstream the supply blower will remove power from all contactors. Steam or Hot Water Preheating and Heating Operation Valve control for steam and hot water heating coils are by others. Heating is accomplished by passing steam or hot water through the steam or hot water coil assembly. Modulating Electric Preheat Electric preheat is used to temper the incoming outside air to the unit based on an enable control signal and outside air conditions. Electric preheat has a maximum operation outside air temperature of 60 F and a maximum preheat discharge air temperature of 80 F. Chilled Water or Non-Compressorized DX Cooling Operation Controls for chilled water cooling coils and non-compressorized DX coil are by others. COMPRESSOR CYCLING 5 MINUTE MINIMUM OFF TIME To prevent motor overheating compressors must cycle off for a minimum of 5 minutes. 5 MINUTE MINIMUM ON TIME To maintain the proper oil level compressors must cycle on for a minimum of 5 minutes. The cycle rate must not exceed 6 starts per hour. WARNING 78 Maintenance (See back of the manual for maintenance log) At least once each year, a trained, qualified service technician should check out the unit. Fans, evaporator coils, and filters should be inspected at least monthly. Gas Heating Make sure all gas supply lines have been purged of air before turning on the electrical power switch. Turn the gas valve to the on position (see startup instructions). Turn the main electrical power on and set the controls to the heating mode of operation. The combustion ventilation motor should operate. The control will automatically supply energy to the igniter and the gas valve after the heating call is made. The flame sensing probe detects the presence of the flame. Should no flame be detected in 10 seconds, the ignition system will recycle. If no flame is detected after 3 tries, ignition system will lockout. Remove the call for heating. The main gas valves should be extinguished. The supply fans are controlled by the ignition system. In the fan Auto mode the fan comes on 45 seconds after the flame is proved and goes off 120 seconds after the heating call is removed. Furnace combustion ventilation air and flue openings should be checked annually for debris and obstructions. If vent extensions are used they must meet category III requirements. This appliance contains a wire screen at the vent outlet. Each heating season, prior to placing the appliance in heat mode maintenance check that no debris or foreign matter has accumulated in the vent outlet. A good practice is to check for debris each time the air filters are changed. In the event the vent outlet becomes blocked do not attempt to start the appliance in heat mode until the entire vent opening is cleared. In the event the unit shut down because the vent was blocked a qualified technician or service agency should monitor the unit prior to re-starting. The gas burner and heat exchanger should never require cleaning. If cleaning is necessary, this indicates faulty operation of the unit. Cleaning should only be done by a qualified service agency and only after consultation with an AAON service representative. If induced draft blower/motor assembly has to be replaced, care must be taken to provide an airtight seal between the blower housing and the burner box. Once a year, before the unit is in operation for the heating season, a qualified service technician should inspect all flue product carrying areas of the furnace and main burners for continued safe operation. WARNING LEAK CHECK GAS PIPE The gas pipe in the unit should be checked for leaks before startup. Leak checking is the responsibility of the installing contractor. All connections should be checked for leaks annually after installation. Failure to leak check could result in fire, explosion, or other hazardous situations. DANGER 79 Gas Heat Exchanger Removal Removal Disconnect all wiring on the heat exchanger. Disconnect flex gas lines and pull out of the way. Remove screws around the perimeter of the heat exchanger face plate that connect it to the unit. Only the outermost screws should be removed. Pull the heat exchanger straight back and out of the unit. It may be necessary to remove some of the control door jambs. Reinstallation Ensure that the neoprene gasket is installed around the perimeter of the heat exchanger. Insert heat exchanger into opening so that the back of the main plate is against the unit bulkhead. Figure 23 - Gas Heat Exchanger Attach the heat exchanger to the bulkhead using the holes around the perimeter. Connect flex gas lines to the piping on the heat exchanger. If flexible gas piping in the unit must be replaced connectors cannot be reused, only new connectors must be used. Connect wiring per the wiring diagram on the controls compartment door. Purge gas lines to the gas valves at the unit. DX Cooling Set unit controls to cooling mode of operation with supply fans on. Check the fan for correct operating direction, amperage and voltage. Check compressor operation, rotation, amperage and voltage to the unit nameplate (check the amperage on the load side of the compressor contactor). Condenser Fans (6-25 and 30 ton) Condenser fans and motors can be removed and reinstalled as individual assemblies. Electric shock hazard. Shut off all electrical power to the unit to avoid shock hazard or injury from rotating parts. WARNING LEAK CHECK GAS PIPE The gas pipe in the unit should be checked for leaks before startup. Leak checking is the responsibility of the installing contractor. All connections should be checked for leaks annually after installation. Failure to leak check could result in fire, explosion, or other hazardous situations. DANGER 80 Removal Take off the fan grill by removing the screws that attach it to the orifice. The condenser fan motor wires can then be accessed and disconnected. Remove the screws that attach the orifice to the condenser assembly. The screws are located on the top of the orifice around the perimeter, and in some cases, through the side of the condenser assembly into the orifice. With the wires disconnected and the screws removed, the fan, motor and orifice assembly can be lifted off the unit. Figure 24 - Removal of a Condenser Fan Assembly Reinstallation Set the condenser fan, motor and orifice assembly back into the condenser assembly with the motor wires on the side closest to the control panel. Attach the orifice to the condenser assembly using all of the points where screws were removed. Reconnect the fan motor wires. Attach the fan grill at all of the points where screws were removed. Condensate Drain Pans Drain pans will have moisture present and require periodic cleaning to prevent microbial growth. Cleaning of the drain pans will also prevent any possible plugging of the drain lines and overflow of the pan itself. Cleaning of the drain pans and inside of the unit should be done only by qualified service technician. Electric shock hazard. Shut off all electrical power to the unit to avoid shock hazard or injury from rotating parts. WARNING Improper installation, adjustment, alteration, service, or maintenance can cause property damage, personal injury, or loss of life. Startup and service must be performed by a Factory Trained Service Technician. WARNING 81 Evaporator Coil (6-25 and 30 ton) Removal Evacuate refrigerant from the systems. Remove the TXV bulbs from the suction lines. Disconnect the suction and liquid line copper connections to the evaporator coil. Figure 25 - Evaporator Coil Access Remove the screws attaching the filter rack to the evaporator coil blank-off panels at the door opening and along the top of the coil. Remove the screws attaching the filter rack to the back wall. Angle filter rack away from coil so it fits through the door opening. It may be necessary to remove economizer damper assembly. Remove screws attaching access side, back, and top blank-off panels to the evaporator coil and the unit. Angle the coil so that it fits through the door opening. Remove the evaporator coil. Reinstallation Install the coil in the unit drain pan. There should be about a 1/4 gap between the upstream side of the coil and the back of the drain pan. Secure the coil to the back wall of the unit with the blank-off panel. Attach the top and access side blank-off panels to the coil. Attach the filter rack to the back, top, and access side coil blank-off panels upstream of the coil. Reinstall economizer damper assembly if necessary. Connect the suction and liquid copper connections to the evaporator coil. Reinstall the TXV bulbs on the suction lines. Evacuate the refrigerant systems. Weigh in the nameplate refrigerant charge. See Adjusting Refrigerant Charge section to check for proper sub-cooling and superheat of the refrigerant systems. Electric shock hazard. Shut off all electrical power to the unit to avoid shock hazard or injury from rotating parts. WARNING 82 Brazed Plate Heat Exchanger Cleaning Because of a normally high degree of turbulence in brazed plate heat exchangers, for many applications the heat exchanger channels are self cleaning. For applications that are not self cleaning ( hard water at high temperatures, etc.) or applications where additional cleaning is desired, it is possible to clean the brazed plate heat exchanger by circulating a cleaning liquid. Use a tank with weak acid, 5% phosphoric acid (H3PO4) or, if the exchanger is frequently cleaned, 5% oxalic acid (H2C2O4). Pump the cleaning liquid through the exchanger. For optimum cleaning, the cleaning solution flow rate should be a minimum of times the normal flow rate, preferably in a back-flush mode. After cleaning, the heat exchanger must be rinsed with clean water. A solution of 1-2% sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO) before the last rinse ensures that all acid is neutralized. E-Coated Coil Cleaning Documented routine cleaning of e-coated coils is required to maintain coating warranty coverage for fin and tube and microchannel coils. Surface loaded fibers or dirt should be removed prior to water rinse to prevent restriction of airflow. If unable to back wash the side of the coil opposite of the coils entering air side, then surface loaded fibers or dirt should be removed with a vacuum cleaner. If a vacuum cleaner is not available, a soft non-metallic bristle brush may be used. In either case, the tool should be applied in the direction of the fins. Coil surfaces can be easily damaged (fin edges bent over) if the tool is applied across the fins. Use of a water stream, such as a garden hose, against a surface loaded coil will drive the fibers and dirt into the coil. This will make cleaning efforts more difficult. Surface loaded fibers must be completely removed prior to using low velocity clean water rinse. A monthly clean water rinse is recommended for coils that are applied in coastal or industrial environments to help to remove chlorides, dirt, and debris. It is very important when rinsing, that water temperature is less than 130 F and pressure is than 900 psig to avoid damaging the fin edges. An elevated water temperature (not to exceed 130 F) will reduce surface tension, increasing the ability to remove chlorides and dirt. Quarterly cleaning is essential to extend the life of an e-coated coil and is required to maintain coating warranty coverage. Coil cleaning shall be part of the unit s regularly scheduled maintenance procedures. Failure to clean an e-coated coil will void the warranty and may result in reduced efficiency and durability. Electric shock hazard. Shut off all electrical power to the unit to avoid shock hazard or injury from rotating parts. WARNING High velocity water from a pressure washer or compressed air should only be used at a very low pressure to prevent fin and/or coil damages. The force of the water or air jet may bend the fin edges and increase airside pressure drop. Reduced unit performance or nuisance unit shutdowns may occur. CAUTION 83 For routine quarterly cleaning, first clean the coil with the below approved coil cleaner. After cleaning the coils with the approved cleaning agent, use the approved chloride remover to remove soluble salts and revitalize the unit. Recommended Coil Cleaner The following cleaning agent, assuming it is used in accordance with the manufacturer s directions on the container for proper mixing and cleaning, has been approved for use on e-coated coils to remove mold, mildew, dust, soot, greasy residue, lint, and other particulate: Enviro-Coil Concentrate, Part Number H-EC01. Recommended Chloride Remover CHLOR*RID DTS should be used to remove soluble salts from the e-coated coil, but the directions must be followed closely. This product is not intended for use as a degreaser. Any grease or oil film should first be removed with the approved cleaning agent. Remove Barrier - Soluble salts adhere themselves to the substrate. For the effective use of this product, the product must be able to come in contact with the salts. These salts may be beneath any soils, grease or dirt; therefore, these barriers must be removed prior to application of this product. As in all surface preparation, the best work yields the best results. Apply CHLOR*RID DTS - Apply directly onto the substrate. Sufficient product must be applied uniformly across the substrate to thoroughly wet out surface, with no areas missed. This may be accomplished by use of a pump-up sprayer or conventional spray gun. The method does not matter, as long as the entire area to be cleaned is wetted. After the substrate has been thoroughly wetted, the salts will be soluble and is now only necessary to rinse them off. Rinse - It is highly recommended that a hose be used, as a pressure washer will damage the fins. The water to be used for the rinse is recommended to be of potable quality, though a lesser quality of water may be used if a small amount of CHLOR*RID DTS is added. Check with CHLOR*RID International, Inc. for recommendations on lesser quality rinse water. Microchannel Coil Cleaning Air-cooled heat exchangers may include microchannel coils. Cleaning microchannel coils is necessary in all locations. In some locations it may be necessary to clean the coils more or less often than recommended. In general, a condenser coil should be cleaned at a minimum of once a year. In locations where there is commonly debris or a condition that causes dirt/grease build up it may be necessary to clean the coils more often. Proper procedure should be followed at every cleaning interval. Using improper cleaning technique or incorrect chemicals will result in coil damage, system performance fall off, and potentially leaks requiring coil replacement. Harsh chemicals, household bleach, or acid cleaners should not be used to clean outdoor or indoor e-coated coils. These cleaners can be very difficult to rinse out of the coil and can accelerate corrosion and attack the e-coating. If there is dirt below the surface of the coil, use the recommended coil cleaners. CAUTION 84 Documented routine cleaning of microchannel coils with factory provided e-coating is required to maintain coating warranty coverage. Use the E-Coated Coil Cleaning section for details on cleaning e-coated coils. Field applied coil coatings are not recommended with microchannel coils. Allowed Chemical Cleaners and Procedures AAON recommends certain chemicals that can be used to remove buildup of grime and debris on the surface of microchannel coils. These chemicals have been tested for performance and safety and are the only chemicals that AAON will warrant as correct for cleaning microchannel coils. There are three procedures that are outlined below that will clean the coils effectively without damage to the coils. Use of any other procedure or chemical may void the warranty to the unit where the coil is installed. With all procedures make sure the unit is off before starting. The water pressure used to clean should not exceed 140 psi, from no closer than 3 inches from the coils, and with the water aimed perpendicular to the coils. #1 Simple Green Simple Green is available from AAON Parts and Supply (Part# T10701) and is biodegradable with a neutral pH. Recommendation is to use it at a 4 to 1 mix. Use the following procedure. 1. Rinse the coil completely with water. Use a hard spray but be careful not to bend or damage the fins. A spray that is too hard will bend the fins. Spray from the fan side of the coil. 2. With a pump sprayer filled with a mix of 4 parts water to one part Simple Green spray the air inlet face of the coil. Be sure to cover all areas of the face of the coil. 3. Allow the coil to soak for 10-15 minutes. 4. Rinse the coil with water as in step one. 5. Repeat as necessary. #2 Vinegar This is standard white vinegar available in gallons from most grocery stores. It has a pH of 2-3, so it is slightly acidic. Use the following procedure. 1. Rinse the coil completely with water. Use a hard spray but be careful not to bend or damage the fins. A spray that is too hard will bend the fins. Spray from the fan side of the coil. 2. Use a pump sprayer filled with vinegar (100%). Spray from the face of the coil in the same direction as the airflow. Be sure to cover all areas of the face of the coil. 3. Allow the coil to soak for 10-15 minutes. 4. Rinse the coil with water as in step one. 5. Repeat as necessary. Electric shock hazard. Shut off all electrical power to the unit to avoid shock hazard or injury from rotating parts. WARNING 85 #3 Water Flush This procedure can be used when the only material to cause the coil to need cleaning is debris from plant material that has impinged the coil face. 1. Rinse the coil completely with water. Use a hard spray but be careful not to bend or damage the fins. A spray that is too hard will bend the fins. Spray from the fan side of the coil. 2. Spray and rinse the coil from the face. Application Examples The three procedures can be used to clean microchannel coils. They will fit with the application depending on the area. In some areas where the spring/summer has a large cottonwood bloom #3 might work fine if the unit is installed on an office building and no other environmental factors apply. When a unit is installed where the sprinkler system has water being sprayed onto the condenser coil you might have better results using #2. Vinegar is slightly acidic and may help with the calcium build up from drying water. This also works well when grease is part of the inlet air to a condenser coil. Generally the best and broadest based procedure is #1. The grease cutting effect of the Simple Green is good for restaurant applications. Other Coil Cleaners There are many cleaners on the market for condenser coils. Before using any cleaner that is not covered in this section you must get written approval from the AAON warranty and service department. Use of unapproved chemicals will void the warranty. AAON testing has determined that unless a chemical has a neutral pH (6-8) it should not be used. Beware of any product that claims to be a foaming cleaner. The foam that is generated is caused by a chemical reaction to the aluminum fin material on tube and fin coils and with the fin, tube, and coating material on microchannel coils. Microchannel coils are robust in many ways, but like any component they must be treated correctly. This includes cleaning the coils correctly to give optimal performance over many years. Roofing The cleaning procedures outlined here use relatively benign ingredients. When working with a rooftop unit care should be taken to make sure the chemicals will not adversely affect the roof coating. Checking with the roofing supplier/manufacturer is the best way to proceed. If the roofing supplier/manufacturer is not available testing of the chemicals on the roof coating is recommended. Commercial roofing material manufacturers using PVC and EPDM have been contacted and indicate that there should be no problem with any of the procedures outlined above. Use pressurized clean water, with pressure not to exceed 140 psi. Nozzle should be 6 and 80 to 90 from coil face. Failure to do so could result in coil damage. CAUTION 86 Supply Fans Lubrication All original fan motors and bearings are furnished with factory lubrication. Some applications will require that bearings be re-lubricated periodically. The schedule will depend on the operating duty, temperature variations or other severe atmospheric conditions. Bearings should be re-lubricated when at normal operating temperatures, but not running. Rotate the fan shaft by hand and add only enough grease to purge the seals. DO NOT OVERLUBRICATE. Recommended greases are: SHELL OIL - DOLIUM R CHEVRON OIL - SRI No. 2 TEXACO INC. - PREMIUM RB Removal (6-25 and 30 tons) Remove fan access panel. Panel is attached with eight 3/8 bolts. Remove the wire connections from Auxiliary Limit Switch (if applicable) which is mounted in the brace at the fan opening. Remove the brace located at the fan opening. Remove the six bolts that connect the motor mount to the blower frame. Two bolts are on the angle on the back of the motor mount box, two are on the bottom inside the motor mount box and two are on the inside front of the motor mount box. Figure 26 - 9-25 and 30 ton Supply Fan Figure 27 - Bolts which Connect Motor Mount to Blower Fan Slide the motor mount back away from the air inlet, so that the blower wheel is clear of the inlet. A screw driver or crowbar can be used to help accomplish this. Use the pry slots on the back side of the motor mount. Electric shock hazard. Shut off all electrical power to the unit to avoid shock hazard or injury from rotating parts. WARNING Blower wheels and bands must be inspected for excessive dust build up periodically and cleaned if required. Excessive dust build up on blower wheels may cause an unbalanced state; leading to vibration and/or component failure. Damages due to excessive dust build up will not be covered under factory warranty. CAUTION 87 Pull the motor mount to the edge of the blower frame at the opening. Remove the motor mount with the motor and blower wheel attached. Large motors will require more than one person. Care must be taken not to damage the compressors or refrigerant lines when removing the motor and fan assembly. Phase and Brownout Protection Module The DPM is a Digital Phase Monitor that monitors line voltages from 200VAC to 240VAC 1 and 200VAC to 600VAC 3 . The DPM is 50/60 Hz self-sensing. DPM should be wired according to unit specific wiring diagram include in the control compartment When the DPM is connected to the line voltage, it will monitor the line and if everything is within the setup parameters, the output contacts will be activated. If the line voltages fall outside the setup parameters, the output relay will be de-energized after the trip delay. Once the line voltages recover, the DPM will re-energize the output relay after the restart time delay. All settings and the last 4 faults are retained, even if there is a complete loss of power. DPM Setup Procedure With the supply voltage active to the module, you can setup all of the DPM s settings without the line voltage connected. To change the setpoint parameters use the right arrow key to advance forward through the setpoint parameters and the left arrow to backup if needed. When each parameter is displayed use the up/down keys to change and set the parameter. After adjustments are made or if no adjustments are made it will take 2 to 4 minutes before the DPM energizes the output relay unless there is an out of tolerance issue with the incoming line voltage. Recommended Default Set-up Line Voltage 460VAC, 3 Over & Undervoltage 10% Trip Time Delay 5 Seconds Re-Start Time Delay 2 Minutes Phase Imbalance 5% 88 Screens Manufacturer s Screen R-K Electronics DPM Average Voltage Screen VAvg Imb Hz 460 0 60 off Default the default screen shows the real time voltage detected in each of the 3 phases: A-B B-C C-A 460 459 461 ON Voltage Selection Screen (Vertical Format) Default = 460V, 3 200, 1 ; 208, 1 ; 220, 1 ; 230, 1 ; 240, 1 ; 200, 3 ; 208, 3 ; 220, 3 ; 230, 3 ; 240, 3 ; 380, 3 ; 415, 3 ; 440, 3 ; 460, 3 ; 480 3 ; 575, 3 ; 600, 3 ; Over/Under voltage Percentage Screen (Vertical Format) Default = 10% 7% 8% 9% 10% 11% 12% 13% 14% & 15% Trip Time Delay Screen (Vertical Format) Default = 5 sec 2S, 3S, 4S, 5S, 6S, 27S, 8S, 9S & 10S Re-Start Time Delay Screen (Vertical Format) Default = 2 sec Manual, 2S, 3S, 4S, 5S, 6S, 7S, 8S, 9S, 10S, 30S, 1M, 2M, 3M & 4M Phase Imbalance Percentage Screen (Vertical Format) Default = 5% 3% 4% 5% 6% 7% 8% 9% & 10% Fault Screen (Vertical Format) 0 most recent faults, 1 previous fault 2 third oldest fault & 3 fourth oldest fault. Fault Words: Phase a Loss (There is no voltage sensed on 3-L1/S) Voltage Low (Average line voltage is less than selected Undervoltage Percentage) Voltage High (Average line voltage is more than selected Overvoltage Percentage) Imbalance (One phase is lower than the average voltage by more than the Imbalance percentage) Phase Loss (One phase is more than 30% below the Line Voltage selection) Bad Rotation (The phase rotation sequence is reversed) Bad Freq (Line frequency out of allowable range of 45 to 65 Hz) 89 Variable Capacity Compressor Controller Units with variable capacity scroll compressors may include the following compressor controller. The following is an explanation of the terminals and troubleshooting alert flash codes of the controller. For more information on the compressor controller, see Emerson Climate Bulletin AE8-1328. Figure 28 - Variable Capacity Compressor Controller Low Voltage Terminals 24COM Module Common 24VAC Module Power C1 & C2 Demand Input & + P1 Pressure Common P2 Pressure Input P3 Pressure Power 5VDC P4 Pressure Shield P5 & P6 Pressure Output & + T1 & T2 Discharge Temperature Sensor High Voltage Terminals A1 & A2 Alarm Relay Out M1 & M2 Contractor L1 Control Voltage N L2 Control Voltage L U1 & U2 Digital Unloader Solenoid V1 & V2 Vapor Injection Solenoid The compressor controller modulates the compressor unloader solenoid in an on/off pattern according to the capacity demand signal of the system. The following table shows the linear relationship between the demand signal and compressor capacity modulation. The compressor controller protects the compressor against high discharge temperature. Refer to Appendix B for the relationship between thermistor temperature readings and resistance values. Table 22 - Demand Signal vs. Compressor Capacity Modulation Demand Signal (VDC) Loaded % Unloaded % Time Loaded Time Unloaded % Compressor Capacity Off Off Off Off 0% 10% 90% sec sec 10% 50% 50% sec sec 50% 80% 20% 12 sec 3 sec 80% 100% 0% 15 sec 0 sec 100% To avoid damaging the Compressor Controller do not connect wires to terminals C3, C4, T3, T4, T5, or T6. WARNING 90 Figure 29 - Compressor Controller Flash Code Details Filter Replacement Monthly air filter inspection is required to maintain optimum unit efficiency. It is strongly recommended that filter media be replaced monthly. Filters are located upstream of the evaporator coil in the filter and economizer section. Open access door and pull filters straight out to inspect all of the filters. Replace filters with the size indicated on each filter or as shown in the tables below. Arrow on the replacement filters must point towards the blower. (RAB = Return Air Bypass, PE = Power Exhaust and PR = Power Return) Electric shock hazard. Shut off all electrical power to the unit to avoid shock hazard or injury from rotating parts. WARNING 91 Filter Information (RAB = Return Air Bypass, PE = Power Exhaust, PR = Power Return) Table 23 - RN Series 11, 13, 16-25 and 30 ton Pre Filters Feature 9A Quantity / Size Type 0 No Pre Filters B,C,D 6 / 20 x 25 x 2 Pleated, 30% Eff, MERV 8 Feature 19 Quantity / Size Type B 3 / 20 x 25 x 1 Metal Mesh, Outside Air With PE and PR, Feature 4A=G,H 2 / 18 x 25 x 1 & 2 / 18 x 30 x 1 Table 24 - RN Series 11, 13, 16-25 and 30 ton Unit Filters Feature 9A Quantity / Size Type 0 6 / 20 x 25 x 2 Pleated, 30% Eff, MERV 8 with RAB, Feature A2 = Q, R 9 / 16 x 20 x 2 A 6 / 20 x 25 x 4 Pleated, 30% Eff, MERV 8 with RAB, Feature A2 = Q, R 9 / 16 x 20 x 4 B 6 / 20 x 25 x 4 Pleated, 65% Eff, MERV 11 C Pleated, 85% Eff, MERV 13 D Pleated, 95% Eff, MERV 14 Table 25 - RN Series 11, 13, 16-25 and 30 ton Energy Recovery Wheel Filters Feature 4A Quantity / Size Type K,Q With Energy Recovery Wheel Exhaust Air Filters, Feature 4C = J,K,N,P OA - 6 / 20 x 16 x 2 EA - 4 / 14 x 25 x 2 Pleated, 30% Eff, MERV 8 With V-Bank Outside Air Filters OA - 6 / 20 x 16 x 2 Table 26 - RN Series 11, 13, 16-25 and 30 ton Final Filters Feature 9C Quantity / Size Type 0 No Final Filters A 6 / 24 x 20 x 12 Pleated, 85% Eff, MERV 13 D 6 / 24 x 20 x 12 Pleated, 95% Eff, MERV 14 U 6 / 24 x 20 x 4 Pleated, 85% Eff, MERV 13 Y 6 / 24 x 20 x 4 Pleated, 95% Eff, MERV 14 92 Figure 30 - RN Series 11, 13, 16-25 and 30 ton Units ton Standard Filter Layouts All dimensions are in inches and are height x length. Layouts are viewed from the upstream side of the cooling coil. Replacement Parts Parts for AAON equipment may be obtained from your local AAON representative. Reference the unit serial number and part number when ordering parts. AAON Warranty, Service and Parts Department 2424 S. Yukon Ave. Tulsa, OK 74107 Ph: 918-583-2266 Fax: 918-382-6364 Note: Before calling, technician should have model and serial number of the unit available for the service department to help answer questions regarding the unit. 93 Appendix A - Heat Exchanger Corrosion Resistance Corrosion Resistance of Copper and Stainless Steel in Brazed Plate Heat Exchangers - Points to Measure and Check in a Water Analysis The resistance guide provides the corrosion resistance of stainless steel type AISI 316 and pure Copper ( ) in water, to a number of important chemical factors. The actual corrosion is a very complex process influenced by many different factors in combination. Explanations: + Good resistance under normal conditions 0 Corrosion problems may occur especially when more factors are valued 0 - Use is not recommended Water Containing Concentration (mg/l or ppm) Time Limits - Analyze Before AISI 316 SMO 254 Copper Alloy Nickel Alloy Alkalinity (HCO3-) < 70 Within 24 Hours + + 0 + 70-300 + + + + > 300 + + 0/+ + Sulfate (SO42-) < 70 No Limit + + + + 70-300 + + 0/- + > 300 0 0 - + HCO3-/ SO42- > No Limit + + + + < + + 0/- + Electrical Conductivity < 10 S/cm No Limit + + 0 + 10-500 S/cm + + + + > 500 S/cm + + 0 + pH < Within 24 Hours 0 0 0 + 0/+ + 0 + + + + + > + + 0 + Ammonium (NH4+) < 2 Within 24 Hours + + + + 2-20 + + 0 + > 20 + + - + Chlorides (Cl-)* < 300 No Limit + + + + > 300 0 + 0/+ + Free Chlorine (Cl2) < 1 Within 5 Hours + + + + 1-5 + + 0 + > 5 0/+ + 0/- + Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) < No Limit + + + + > + + 0/- + Free (aggressive) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) < 5 No Limit + + + + 5-20 + + 0 + > 20 + + - + *See Chloride Content Table 94 Water Containing Concentration (mg/l or ppm) Time Limits - Analyze Before AISI 316 SMO 254 Copper Alloy Nickel Alloy Total Hardness ( dH) No Limit + + + + Nitrate (NO3) < 100 No Limit + + + + > 100 + + 0 + Iron (Fe) < No Limit + + + + > + + 0 + Aluminum (Al) < No Limit + + + + > + + 0 + Manganese (Mn) < No Limit + + + + > + + 0 + Chloride Content Chloride Content Maximum Temperature 60 C (140 F) 80 C (176 F) 120 C (248 F) 130 C (266 F) = 10 ppm SS 304 SS 304 SS 304 SS 316 = 25 ppm SS 304 SS 304 SS 316 SS 316 = 50 ppm SS 304 SS 316 SS 316 Ti / SMO 254 = 80 ppm SS 316 SS 316 SS 316 Ti / SMO 254 = 150 ppm SS 316 SS 316 Ti / SMO 254 Ti / SMO 254 = 300 ppm SS 316 Ti / SMO 254 Ti / SMO 254 Ti / SMO 254 > 300 ppm Ti / SMO 254 Ti / SMO 254 Ti / SMO 254 Ti / SMO 254 95 Appendix B - Thermistor Temperature vs. Resistance ValuesDeg C Deg F Resistance (kOhms) -40 -40 -35 -31 -30 -22 -25 -13 -20 -4 -15 5 -10 14 -5 23 0 32 5 41 10 50 15 59 20 68 25 77 30 86 35 95 40 104 45 113 50 122 55 131 60 140 65 149 Deg C Deg F Resistance (kOhms) 70 158 75 167 80 176 85 185 90 194 95 203 100 212 105 221 110 230 115 239 120 248 125 257 130 266 135 275 140 284 145 293 150 302 155 311 160 320 165 329 170 338 175 347 180 356 96 RN Series Startup Form Date:______________ Job Name:___________________________________ __________________________________ Address:________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________ ____________________________________Mode l Number:_________________________________ ________________________________ Serial Number:_________________________________ ___________ Tag:_______________ Startup Contractor:_____________________________ _________________________________ Address:________________________________ _________________ ________________________________________ ________________ Phone:_____________ Pre Startup Checklist Installing contractor should verify the following items. 1. Is there any visible shipping damage? Yes No 2. Is the unit level? Yes No 3. Are the unit clearances adequate for service and operation? Yes No 4. Do all access doors open freely and are the handles operational? Yes No 5. Have all electrical connections been tested for tightness? Yes No 6. Does the electrical service correspond to the unit nameplate? Yes No 7. On 208/230V units, has transformer tap been checked? Yes No 8. Has overcurrent protection been installed to match the unit nameplate requirement? Yes No 9. Have all set screws on the fans been tightened? Yes No 10. Do all fans rotate freely? Yes No 11. Is all copper tubing isolated so that it does not rub? Yes No 12. Has outside air rain hood been opened? Yes No 13. Have the damper assemblies been inspected? Yes No 14. Are the air filters installed with proper orientation? Yes No 15. Have condensate drain and p-trap been connected? Yes No Supply Fan Assembly Alignment Check Rotation Nameplate Amps________ Number hp L1 L2 L3 1 2 Band Size_____________________ VAV Controls_________________ VFD Frequency________________ 97 Energy Recovery Wheel Assembly Wheel(s) Spin Freely Check Rotation FLA____________ Number hp L1 L2 L3 1 2 Power Return/Exhaust Assembly Alignment Check Rotation Nameplate Amps________ Number hp L1 L2 L3 1 2 Outside Air/Economizer Dampers Operation Check Damper Actuator Type: Economizer Changeover Type and Operations: Damper Wiring Check Gears Check Ambient Temperature Ambient Dry Bulb Temperature ________ F Ambient Wet Bulb Temperature ________ F Unit Configuration Water-Cooled Condenser Air-Cooled Condenser No Water Leaks Condenser Safety Check Water Flow ________GPM Water Inlet Temperature ________ F Water Outlet Temperature ________ F Compressors / DX Cooling Number/stage L1 L2 L3 Head Pressure PSIG Suction Pressure PSIG Crankcase Heater Amps 1 2 3 4 98 Refrigeration System 1 Cooling Mode Pressure Saturated Temperature Line Temperature Sub-cooling Superheat Discharge N/A N/A Suction N/A Liquid N/A Refrigeration System 2 Cooling Mode Pressure Saturated Temperature Line Temperature Sub-cooling Superheat Discharge N/A N/A Suction N/A Liquid N/A Refrigeration System 3 Cooling Mode Pressure Saturated Temperature Line Temperature Sub-cooling Superheat Discharge N/A N/A Suction N/A Liquid N/A Refrigeration System 4 Cooling Mode Pressure Saturated Temperature Line Temperature Sub-cooling Superheat Discharge N/A N/A Suction N/A Liquid N/A Refrigeration System 1 Heating Mode (Heat Pump only) Pressure Saturated Temperature Line Temperature Sub-cooling Superheat Discharge N/A N/A Suction N/A Liquid N/A Refrigeration System 2 Heating Mode (Heat Pump only) Pressure Saturated Temperature Line Temperature Sub-cooling Superheat Discharge N/A N/A Suction N/A Liquid N/A Refrigeration System 3 Heating Mode (Heat Pump only) Pressure Saturated Temperature Line Temperature Sub-cooling Superheat Discharge N/A N/A Suction N/A Liquid N/A 99 Refrigeration System 4 Heating Mode (Heat Pump only) Pressure Saturated Temperature Line Temperature Sub-cooling Superheat Discharge N/A N/A Suction N/A Liquid N/A Air-Cooled Condenser Alignment Check Rotation Nameplate Amps________ Number hp L1 L2 L3 1 2 3 4 5 6 Water/Glycol System 1. Has the entire system been flushed and pressure checked? Yes No 2. Has the entire system been filled with fluid? Yes No 3. Has air been bled from the heat exchangers and piping? Yes No 4. Is the glycol the proper type and concentration (N/A if water)? Yes No 5. Is there a minimum load of 50% of the design load? Yes No 6. Has the water piping been insulated? Yes No 7. What is the freeze point of the glycol (N/A if water)? ________________________________ Gas Heating Natural Gas Propane Purge Air from Lines Verify Pilot Spark Stage Manifold Pressure ( ) Stage Manifold Pressure ( ) 1 3 2 4 Electric Heating Stages__________ Limit Lockout Aux. Limit Lockout Stage Amps Stage Amps 1 5 2 6 3 7 4 8 100 Electric Preheating Limit Lockout Aux. Limit Lockout Outside Air Temperature Setpoint ________ F Preheat Leaving Air Temperature Setpoint ________ F Stage Amps Stage Amps 1 5 2 6 3 7 4 8 Maintenance Log This log must be kept with the unit. It is the responsibility of the owner and/or maintenance/service contractor to document any service, repair or adjustments. AAON Service and Warranty Departments are available to advise and provide phone help for proper operation and replacement parts. The responsibility for proper start-up, maintenance and servicing of the equipment falls to the owner and qualified licensed technician. Entry Date Action Taken Name/Tel. Literature Change History April 2016 Added Adjustable Fan Cycling Switch Procedure section. AAON 2425 South Yukon Ave. Tulsa, OK 74107-2728 Phone: 918-583-2266 Fax: 918-583-6094 RN Series Horizontal Installation, Operation & Maintenance V76270 Rev. A 160425 It is the intent of AAON to provide accurate and current product information. However, in the interest of product improvement, AAON reserves the right to change pricing, specifications, and/or design of its product without notice, obligation, or liability. Copyright AAON, all rights reserved throughout the world. AAON and AAONAIRE are registered trademarks of AAON, Inc., Tulsa, OK.

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