Example: bachelor of science

Conroe Independent School District Program of …

05/09/2018 Conroe Independent School District Program of Studies 2018-2019 Caney Creek High School Irons Junior High Conroe High School Knox Junior High

Tags:

  Programs, School, Independent, District, Conroe independent school district program of, Conroe

Information

Domain:

Source:

Link to this page:

Please notify us if you found a problem with this document:

Other abuse

Text of Conroe Independent School District Program of …

05/09/2018 Conroe Independent School District Program of Studies 2018-2019 Caney Creek High School Irons Junior High Conroe High School Knox Junior High Grand Oaks High School McCullough Junior High Hauke Academic Alternative School Moorhead Junior High Oak Ridge High School Peet Junior High The Woodlands College Park High School Washington Junior High The Woodlands High School York Junior High 05/09/2018 Senior High Schools Junior High Schools Caney Creek High School 936-709-2000 Dr. Jeffrey Stichler, Principal Irons Junior High 936-709-8500 Jeff Fuller, Principal Conroe High School 936-709-5700 Dr. Mark Weatherly, Principal Knox Junior High 832-592-8400 Joe Daw, Principal Conroe High School - 9th Grade Campus 936-709-4000 Bryan Gorka, Principal McCullough Junior High 832-592-5100 Chris McCord, Principal Grand Oaks High School 281-939-0000 Dr. Chris Povich, Principal Moorhead Junior High 936-709-2400 Robert Garcia, Principal Hauke Academic Alternative School 936-709-3420 Paula Nicolini, Principal Peet Junior High 936-709-3700 Tasha Smith, Principal Oak Ridge High School 832-592-5300 Tommy Johnson, Principal Washington Junior High 936-709-7400 Hartwell Brown, Principal Oak Ridge High School 9th Grade Campus 281-465-5000 Livecchi, Principal York Junior High 832-592-8600 Ron Galindo, Principal The Woodlands College Park High School 936-709-3000 Dr. Mark Murrell, Principal The Woodlands High School 936-709-1200 Gregg Colschen, Principal The Woodlands High School 9th Grade Campus 832-592-8200 Jill Houser, Principal Academy for Careers in Engineering & Science 835-482-6700 Dr. Mike Papadimitriou, Headmaster Academy of Science & Health Professions 936-709-5731 Dr. Terri Benson, Headmaster Academy of Science & Technology 936-709-3250 Dr. Susan Caffery, Headmaster The Conroe Independent School District (District) as an equal opportunity educational provider and employer does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, or disability in educational programs or activities that it operates or in employment matters. The District is required by Title VI and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act, as well as Board policy not to discriminate in such a manner. For information about Title IX rights or Section 504/ADA rights, contact the Title IX Coordinator or the Section 504/ADA coordinator at 3205 W. Davis, Conroe, Texas 77304; (936) 709-7752. 05/09/2018 How to Use This Planning Guide ........................................ ........ 4 High School Graduation Requirements ...................................... 5 College Admission High School Graduation Requirements for cohorts 2018-2019 ........................................ ........................... 5 Foundation High School Program and Endorsements students entering high school Fall, 2014 and beyond .............. 5 Endorsements ........................................ .................................. 5 Distinguished Achievement Plan ........................................ ...... 5 College Admission Requirements ........................................ .... 5 Course Availability ........................................ ........................... 5 Early Graduation ........................................ .............................. 6 Eligibility for Participation in Commencement Services: Graduation Requirements ........................................ ............... 6 Conroe ISD High School Graduation Requirements Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2010 - 2013 ..........................7 Conroe ISD High School Graduation Requirements Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2014 and Beyond ...............8 Endorsements ........................................ .......................... ..............9 Sequence of Courses ........................................ ...................... 10 Levels of Courses of Study ........................................ ............. 10 Level Courses ........................................ ................................. 10 PreAP and Honors Courses ........................................ ............ 10 Dual Credit 10 CISD Approved Dual Credit Courses for Lone Star College ..... 11 Advanced Placement ........................................ ..................... 12 Advanced Course Agreement ........................................ ........ 13 Gifted and Talented ........................................ ....................... 14 Special Education ........................................ ........................... 14 Special Education Classes ........................................ ............... 14 Homebound Services ........................................ ..................... 14 Foreign Exchange Students ........................................ ............ 14 College Readiness ........................................ ............................ 15 How Can I Make Sure My Student Is College Ready? ............. 15 Four Key Dimensions of College Readiness ............................ 15 Measuring College Readiness ........................................ ........ 15 Testing Information ........................................ ....................... 15 Steps toward College ........................................ ..................... 16 NCAA Guidelines for College-Bound Athletes ........................ 18 Exploring Post-Secondary Options ........................................ . 18 Career and Technical Education ........................................ ....... 19 The 16 Career Clusters ........................................ ................... 19 Career and Technical Education Courses ............................... 20 Advanced Technical Credit Program (ATC)............................. 21 Grading and Class Rank System ........................................ ....... 22 Grade Point System, Class Rank, and Other Grade-Related Issues ........................................ ........................................ ..... 22 GPA Exempt Courses ........................................ ...................... 22 22 Transcripts ........................................ ..................................... 22 Courses Taken for No Credit or Retaken for Mastery ............ 23 Grade Averaging for 2-Semester Courses .............................. 23 Grade Level Classification Requirements ............................... 23 Transfers and Transfer of Credit ........................................ .... 23 Grade Transcription ........................................ ....................... 24 Academic Lettering ........................................ ........................ 25 Eligibility for Extracurricular Activities ................................... 25 Selection of Courses for Next Year ........................................ ...27 General Information ........................................ ....................... 27 Elective Courses ........................................ ............................. 27 Local Credit Courses ........................................ ....................... 27 Schedule 27 Level Changes ........................................ ................................. 27 Examples of Typical Courses of Study for Core Content Courses ........................................ ........................................ ............... 28 Other Credit Opportunities ........................................ ..............30 Campus Permission ........................................ ........................ 30 Virtual/Online Courses ........................................ ................... 30 Correspondence/Virtual/Online Courses ............................... 30 Credit by Exam ........................................ ............................... 30 High School Courses Taken in Junior High .............................. 31 Campus Computer-Assisted Courses ...................................... 31 Off Campus Physical Education Program Guidelines .............. 31 Summer School 2019 ........................................ ...................... 32 Catalog of Courses: Senior Science ........................................ ........................................ ... 34 Social Studies ........................................ .................................. 37 Math ........................................ ........................................ ....... 39 English ........................................ ........................................ .... 41 Journalism ........................................ ...................................... 44 Speech and Debate ........................................ ........................ 45 Languages other than English (LOTE) ..................................... 45 Fine Arts ........................................ ........................................ . 47 Health and Physical Education ........................................ ....... 55 Career and Technical Education ........................................ .......57 Computer Science ........................................ .......................... 75 Military Science ........................................ .............................. 76 Other ........................................ ........................................ ...... 76 Workforce Dual Credit ........................................ .................... 76 CISD Student Transportation Agreement ..................................78 How to Use This Planning Guide - Junior High ..........................79 Course Selection Philosophy ........................................ .......... 79 Required Courses ........................................ ........................... 79 Course Registration ........................................ ........................ 79 Course Request Deadlines ........................................ .............. 79 Assignment to Classes ........................................ .................... 79 Student Course Requests Online ........................................ .... 80 Math Guidelines for Algebra 1 & Application for Credit by Exam ........................................ ........................................ ....... 80 Math Course Selection for Incoming 7th Graders .................... 80 What if My Child Qualifies for High School Algebra ................ 80 Academic Courses - 8th Grade ........................................ ......... 80 Math Course Selection for Incoming 8th Graders .................... 81 Calculator Information ........................................ ................... 81 Electives ........................................ ........................................ . 81 Grading ........................................ ........................................ ... 81 Catalog of Courses: Junior High ........................................ ........83 7th Grade Courses ........................................ ........................... 83 8th Grade Courses ........................................ ........................... 84 Electives ........................................ ........................................ . 85 Junior High Courses for High School Credit ............................ 87Table of Contents 05/09/2018 4 How to Use This Planning Guide How to Use This Planning Guide Planning a four-year high school program is an important undertaking. The courses you select should be guided by your plans for the future. As the world becomes smaller due to technological advances, it becomes increasingly more important to your future for you to choose a challenging course of study. When you enter the 9th grade, you are a member of a cohort which identifies the year of your expected graduation. Example: a student entering 9th grade in 2018-19 is a member of Cohort 2022. It is important to think about your future and the type of post-secondary education that you will need. Your course selections should reflect your desire to prepare for your life after high school. Choosing your courses should be guided by your interests as well as your abilities. Some students are sure of their future plans; others are still deciding. The courses that you choose will help you clarify your interest. While it may seem tempting to schedule a less demanding combination of courses, choosing rigorous courses that meet your needs or interests is the best way to prepare for your future. In Conroe ISD, there is a wide range of programs designed to prepare students for post-high school experiences: college, business or technical school, military service, fine arts, immediate employment and many others. These programs allow you to choose the one that is best suited to your needs. On the following pages you will see the graduation requirements and the graduation plans that are available to you. There is also information relating to career planning that may be helpful. These pages should assist you in personalizing your plan. You will then find a description of the courses offered along with any information on prerequisites or grade level placement. Students will create their four-year with a counselor. Many people can advise you and support you through this process. Your parents, teachers and counselors can assist you to better understand your goals, the graduation programs, and careers. These adults are familiar with the work you have done in different subjects and will be able to make suggestions about your program of studies. Their advice will be very helpful. Other people, who know you well, such as relatives and friends, can also help you. Talk with them so that you can consider their ideas. It is also helpful to talk with people who are currently in those careers that you find interesting. They can share information about their work and what courses will help you prepare for the future. Junior High Students and Parents: o Review the Junior High Program of Study. o Read about the differences in the ways in which core courses are offered at junior high and high school. o Study the content and requirements for the core and elective courses available for your grade level. o Think about your future goals for high school and college. With this information in mind, begin to develop an understanding of the program of study you will pursue in high school by looking at the Senior High section of the guide. Also consider the examples of ways to earn high school credit while in junior high school. o Create a high school four-year plan. o Make a final decision about the courses you plan to take for next year. Complete the Course Selection process provided by your campus to indicate your request for next year and submit it by the required deadline. o Learn more about careers, majors, and colleges in Naviance Family Connection. Senior High Students and Parents: o Review the graduation requirements for the year in which you enter high school as a freshman. o Review the 4-Year Plan that you have completed and/or review records of the high school courses you have already taken. o Research careers, colleges, and majors in Naviance Family Connection. o Think about your post-secondary education plans and career goals. Decide which college and/or articulated credit opportunities you might want to purse in high school. o Review the formats in which core courses are offered. o Choose courses for next year s schedule that support your 4-Year Plan and career goals. Be sure you have completed the prerequisite requirements for the courses you select. o Complete the Course Selection that was issued by your campus and submit it by the required deadline. 05/09/2018 5 High School Graduation Requirements High School Graduation Requirements Foundation High School Program and Endorsements students entering high school Fall, 2014 and beyond College Admission High School Graduation Requirements for Cohorts 2018 and Beyond HB 5, passed by the Legislature in 2013, changed the requirements for eligibility for automatic admission for the top 10 % to a Texas public 4-year-college. In order for students in cohorts 2018 and beyond to be eligible, the must: Complete the Foundation High School Program (FHSP) Complete at least one endorsement Complete Algebra II NOTE: SB 175 allows the University of Texas at Austin to cap its top 10% admissions at 75% of the freshman class. UT admissions will release auto admission percentages in the fall. (See your counselor for details.) Any student who completes the Foundation High School Program, is eligible to apply to any Texas 4-year college. They will have to meet the college s entrance requirements, and meet all deadlines. The Foundation High School Plan with Endorsements The Foundation High School with Endorsements is the default graduation plan for CISD students entering in the Fall of 2014. It was designed to give students more flexibility in scheduling classes. The plan includes 4 credits in each of the core subjects, 2 credits in Foreign Language, 1 credit each in PE and in Fine Arts, plus credit of health. The remaining 5 credits will combine to complete an endorsement. Endorsements Endorsements may be chosen in the following areas: STEM Business and Industry Public Service Arts and Humanities Multidisciplinary Studies Students will be completing four-year plans with their counselors to include one or more endorsements. Note: Due to availability of courses, endorsements may have to be adjusted. Distinguished Level of Achievement To earn the distinguished level of achievement, students must complete: The Foundation High School Program An Endorsement Algebra II Students completing the distinguished level are eligible for college admissions under the top 10% automatic admissions provision. Texas House Bill 5 was approved by the Texas Legislature creating the Foundation High School Plan and Endorsements. This plan is required for all students that enter their freshman year in 2014 and beyond. Students that entered high school prior to 2014 may seek to graduate under this plan. Students interested in this option should consult with their guidance counselor. College Admission Requirements Individual college catalogs/websites should be consulted for specific admission requirements. Certain college majors may require more math and science or foreign language. If you are considering applying to a selective college, consult the college website, your high school counselor, and visit the College and Career center to learn about specific entrance requirements. Students may access a College and Career Handbook on the school s website. Course Availability Conroe ISD takes pride in serving the specific and unique needs of the community in which our high school campuses are located. A few of the factors that can impact courses offered are the campus size, student interest, teacher availability, and facilities specific to a campus. Although each campus is unique, Conroe ISD high schools will offer courses necessary for students to meet the foundation high school program. 05/09/2018 6 High School Graduation Requirements Early Graduation Students who wish to graduate early (3 years) must file an early graduation plan no later than the end of the tenth grade. The student and parent should make an appointment with the counselor to develop a graduation plan as soon as this decision is made. Early graduates must complete the graduation requirements for the Foundation High School Plan with endorsement. Eligibility for Participation in Commencement Services: Graduation Requirements To receive a high school diploma from the Conroe Independent School District, a student must successfully complete the graduation requirements and pass required assessments. Students who wish to participate in graduation ceremonies must do so at the first ceremony after completing all graduation requirements. Students must meet campus deadlines. Ceremonies are held each spring, in the middle of the year, and at the end of the summer session. Consult your counselor for dates. A student who receives special education services and who has been enrolled in high school for four or more years has the option of participating in the graduation ceremony regardless of whether he/she is actually graduating that year. Students are permitted to participate in only one graduation ceremony. The actual graduation/completion of high school is still determined by meeting the requirements set forth by the Conroe Independent School District, the State of Texas, and/or criteria established by the student s ARD committee. Students/parents who wish more information should see their counselor. 05/09/2018 7 High School Graduation Requirements Conroe ISD High School Graduation Requirements Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2010 - 2013 Recommended High School Plan Credits English I, II, III, IV Credits Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II See list of approved 4th year math courses. Credits Biology, Chemistry, Physics See list of approved 4th year science courses. Social Credits World Geography, World History, US History, Government/Economics Language other than Credits Must consist of 2 credits of the same language. Credit or Health Science Technology or P. E. Substitute**........1 Credit Can substitute Marching Band, Drill Team, Cheerleading, JROTC, Athletics, or approved off-campus physical activity program. Fine Credit Levels I-IV: Art, Dance, Music, Theater, OR Principles and Elements of Floral Design Credit Communication Applications OR Professional Communications Credits Must be state-approved courses Recommended High School Plan (26 Credits) Distinguished Achievement Plan Credits English I, II, III, IV Credits Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II See list of approved 4th year math courses. Credits Biology, Chemistry, Physics See list of approved 4th year science courses. Social Credits World Geography, World History, US History, Government/Economics Language other than Credits Must consist of 3 credits of the same language. Credit or Health Science Technology or P. E. Substitute**........1 Credit Can substitute Marching Band, Drill Team, Cheerleading, JROTC, Athletics, or approved off-campus physical activity program. Fine Credit Levels I-IV: Art, Dance, Music, Theater, OR Principles and Elements of Floral Design Credit Communication Applications OR Professional Communications Credits Must be state-approved courses Advanced Find additional requirements in course catalog Distinguished High School Plan (26 Credits) 4th Year Mathematics Course Options: Recommended Plan: Mathematical Models with Applications (only If taken prior to Algebra II) Mathematical Applications in Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources (only if taken prior to Algebra II) Engineering Mathematics Independent Study in Mathematics (Ex. College Algebra) Precalculus Statistics and Risk Management AP Calculus AB or BC AP Computer Science AP Statistics Advanced Quantitative Reasoning Distinguished Plan: Engineering Mathematics Independent Study in Mathematics (Ex. College Algebra) Precalculus Statistics and Risk Management AP Calculus AB or BC AP Computer Science AP Statistics Dual Credit College Algebra Advanced Quantitative Reasoning Note: Three credits of mathematics must be taken during grades 9-12. Courses taken in Junior High such as Algebra I and Geometry will count toward the mathematics requirement for high school. It is CISD s expectation that students take math all four years they are in high school. 4th Year Science Course Options: Advanced Animal Science Advanced Biotechnology Advanced Plant and Soil Science Anatomy and Physiology AP Biology AP Chemistry AP Environmental Science AP Physics 2 AP Physics C Aquatic Science Astronomy Earth and Space Science Engineering Design and Problem Solving Environmental Systems Food Science Forensic Science Medical Microbiology Pathophysiology Scientific Research and Design 05/09/2018 8 High School Graduation Requirements Foundation High School Plan with Endorsement Plan Credits English I, II, III, IV Credits Algebra I, Geometry, 2 Advanced Math Courses See list of approved math courses. Credits Biology, Chemistry, Physics or Principles of Technology, And 1 Advanced Science Course. See list of approved science courses. Social Credits World Geography or AP Human Geography, World History, US History, Government/Economics Language other than 2 Credits Must consist of 2 credits of the same language. Credit Or Health Science Technology or P. E. Substitute**........1 Credit (Max of 4 credits) Can substitute Marching Band, Drill Team, Cheerleading, JROTC, Athletics, or approved off-campus physical activity program. Fine Credit Levels I-IV: Art, Dance, Music, Theater, OR Principles and Elements of Floral Design Credits To include the student s chosen endorsement. See list of Endorsements. HB5 FHSP with Endorsement (26 Credits) FHSP Advanced Math Course Options: Algebra II Mathematical Models with Applications Mathematical Applications in Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Digital Electronics Robotics Endorsement Plan Advanced Math Course Options: Algebra II Engineering Mathematics Independent Study in Mathematics (Ex. College Algebra) Pre-Calculus Statistics and Risk Management AP Calculus AB or BC AP Computer Science AP Statistics Advanced Quantitative Reasoning Discrete Math for Problem Solving Discrete Math for Computer Science College Prep Math Multi Variable Calculus Endorsement Plan Advanced Science Course Options: Advanced Animal Science Advanced Biotechnology Advanced Plant and Soil Science Anatomy and Physiology AP Biology AP Chemistry AP Environmental Science AP Physics 2 AP Physics C Aquatic Science Astronomy Earth and Space Science Engineering Design and Problem Solving Environmental Systems Food Science Forensic Science Medical Microbiology Pathophysiology Scientific Research and Design Principals of Engineering For students to earn the Distinguished level of achievement (and be eligible for automatic college admissions under the top 10% rule), the student must complete: The Foundation High School Plan An Endorsement Algebra II Conroe ISD High School Graduation Requirements Students entering 9th grade in fall 2014 and beyond 05/09/2018 9 High School Graduation Requirements Endorsements All endorsement plans require the 4th math and 4th science. Campus offerings vary in electives for each endorsement, so please check your Program of Studies for what is available on your campus. Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (STEM) Requires Algebra II, Biology, Chemistry, Physics or Principles of Technology AND: Coherent sequence of 4 credits in CTE STEM courses, OR Coherent sequence of four courses in computer science, OR Three credits in mathematics (Algebra II + two for which Algebra II is the prerequisite, OR Five courses in science (two in addition to Physics, Biology, and Chemistry, OR In addition to Algebra II, Biology, Chemistry and Physics, three credits from no more than two of the above categories. Business and Industry Coherent sequence of four English elective courses to include three levels of one of: Advanced Broadcast Journalism Advanced Journalism: Newspaper Public Speaking Advanced Journalism: Yearbook, Debate, OR Coherent sequence of four credits from these CTE course clusters (including two in one cluster and one advanced course): Agriculture food and natural resources Architecture and construction Arts/Audio-Visual technology, and communications Business management and administration Finance Hospitality and tourism Information Technology Manufacturing Marketing Transportation, Distribution and Logistics, OR Four Technology Applications credits, OR Four credits of any of the above in a coherent sequence that is documented in the student s 4-year plan. Public Services Coherent sequence of 4 or more credits in CTE courses (2 in same cluster, one advanced) to include: Education and training, OR Government and Public Administration, OR Human services, OR Health science, OR Law, Public safety, corrections and securities, OR Four courses in Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) Arts and Humanities Five social studies credits, OR Four levels of the same language other than English (LOTE), OR Two levels of the same LOTE and two more levels of a different LOTE, OR Coherent sequence of 4 credits in one or two categories or disciplines of Fine Arts (Art, Dance, Theater Arts, Band, Choir, Orchestra) Multidisciplinary studies Four advanced courses that prepare a student to enter the Workforce successfully, or post-secondary education without remediation (no coherent sequence required), OR Four credits in each of the four Foundation subject areas to include English IV and Chemistry and/or Physics, OR Four AP, IB or dual credit courses selected from English, math, science, social studies, economics, LOTE or fine arts. 05/09/2018 10 High School Graduation Requirements Sequence of Courses Students may not take more than 1 required core course per academic school year in English, mathematics, science and social studies without principal approval. The four-year plan must indicate the student s intention to take additional courses for elective credit during the junior and/or senior year. No student will be allowed to take a math course in which he/she has not completed all of the prerequisite course(s). Levels of Courses of Study The District s high schools offer Level Courses, Pre-Advanced Placement/Honors Courses, Dual Credit Courses, Advanced Placement Courses, Career and Technical Education Courses, and Special Education Courses. A brief description of each follows. Level Courses Level courses are designed to provide students a high level of academic preparation that will enable the student to prepare for post-secondary educational opportunities and /or joining the community work force. PreAP and Honors Courses The PreAP and Honors classes include the curriculum of the level classes, but with a more in-depth study of the areas within the course. Honors designation indicates an accelerated course in areas where there is no PreAP course available. (ex: level, Honors, Advanced Placement). The PreAP and Honors curriculum is designed to prepare students for Advanced Placement or for the next Honors course in that subject area. Students who are successful in Honors and PreAP classes should consider taking Advanced Placement courses. Honors courses are accelerated courses with enriched content. Honors/PreAP courses are offered in English, LOTE, mathematics, social studies, science and computer science. Careful consideration should be given when deciding to take advanced courses as class sizes may limit a school s ability to allow a student to change levels. These courses require more individual initiative, analytical reading, student interaction, research, and time for outside class preparation. Students should be prepared to spend more time on homework. Students are better prepared for Advanced Placement and Dual Credit classes upon successful completion of Honors/PreAP courses. Dual Credit Courses The high school/college dual credit program will provide qualified high school students an opportunity to earn high school credit toward graduation, as well as college credit for designated courses. Students can select these courses when preparing their high school graduation plan and graduate with college credit hours that can be used toward completion of a college degree. Students should be aware of campus and college deadlines for submitting all required forms and payments. College credits earned through the Dual Credit Program will be accepted by most institutions on the same basis as other college credit. Proof of registration must be provided to the high school counselor. Dual credit grades will count in the GPA. Students who are approved for off-campus college courses have either first or last period release time in the high school schedule for this course. Those who drop the course after the first two weeks of class, or do not attend the course, will receive an F on the high school transcript for that course. All dual credit courses do count for UIL eligibility purposes (no pass, no play) whether they are taken on or off campus. Students taking dual credit courses off campus must enroll in college classes that will not conflict with courses on the high school campus. Lunches and schedules will not be adjusted in order to accommodate college courses. Taking an off-campus course will not guarantee a parking space at the high school. Students may schedule a dual credit college course at a time after 3:00 if that best fits their schedules. Please address any question to the high school counselor. Dual credit courses must be approved by the high school counselor in advance, and Must meet college admissions deadline in accordance with campus deadlines for course requests. 05/09/2018 11 High School Graduation Requirements Dual Credit Grade Points Students taking dual credit courses will receive grade points according to the following: 1. Course taught off of the high school campus receives level grade points commensurate with the grade earned. 2. Core academic courses taught on the high school campus receive the maximum grade points available for the grade earned. 3. All other courses will be awarded level grade points. CISD Course # CISD Course Title CISD Credits LSC Course # LSC Course Title LSC Credits 2161U English III (CCHS, CHS, TWHS,ORHS) 1 ENGL 1301/ENGL 1302 Composition & Rhetoric I Composition & Rhetoric II 3/3 2211U English IV (TWHS, TWCP,CHS) 1 ENGL 1301/ENGL 1302 Composition & Rhetoric I Composition & Rhetoric II 3/3 2171U English IV (CCHS, CHS, ORHS,TWHS) 1 ENGL 2332/ENGL 2333 Survey of World Literature (Ancient to mid-17th century) 3/3 190UB Independent Study: College Algebra (CHS, CCHS, ORHS, TWHS) .5 MATH 1314 College Algebra 3 113IU US History (CCHS, TWHS, CHS, TWCP, ORHS) 1 HIST 1301/HIST 1302 United States History I United States History II 3/3 K225UH Professional Communication (CHS) .5 SPCH 1315 OR SPCH 1318 Public Speaking /Interpersonal Communication 3 118UH Government (CHS, TWCP) .5 GOVT 2305 Government 3 3091U Spanish IV 1 SPAN 2311/SPAN 2312 Intermediate Spanish I/Intermediate Spanish II 3/3 1971* College Prep Math 1 MATH 0309/MATH 0310 Foundations of Mathematical Reasoning/Intermediate Algebra *TSI waiver 2111* English College Prep 1 ENGL 0306/ENGL 0309 /ENGL 0304 Developmental Reading/Writing-Integrated Reading and Writing *TSI Waiver May be offered at LSC campuses or LSC online M170A PreCalculus A .5 MATH 1316 Trigonometry 3 M170B PreCalculus B .5 MATH 2412 PreCalculus 3 Independent Study: Calculus A .5 MATH 2413 Calculus I 3 Independent Study: Calculus B .5 MATH 2314 Calculus II 3 M134H Psychology .5 PSYC 2301 General Psychology 3 M136H Sociology .5 SOCI 1301 Principles of Sociology 3 M118H Government .5 GOVT 2305 American Government 3 M120H Economics .5 ECON 2301 Macroeconomics 3 M309A Spanish IV A .5 SPAN 2311 Intermediate Spanish I 3 M309B Spanish IV B .5 SPAN 2312 Intermediate Spanish II 3 KM225H Professional Communication .5 SPCH 1315 OR SPCH 1318 Public Speaking/interpersonal Communication 3 KM4511E Law Enforcement I 1 CRU 1301 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 KM4521E Law Enforcement II 1 CRU 1307 Crime in America 3 Workforce Dual Credit-LSC KM4631E EMT Basics 1 EMSP 1305 Emergency Care Attendant 3 KM4642E Practicum in Law, PS, Corrections & Security 2 EMSP 1501/EMSP 1160 EMT/EMT Clinical 3/3 KM4762E Welding I 2 WLDG 1421/ WLDG 1417 Welding Fundamentals/Intro to Layout & Fabrication 4/4 KM4772E Welding II 2 WLDG 1428 / WLDG 1457 Intro to Shielded Metal Arc Welding/Intermediate Shielded Metal Arc Welding 4/4 KM3511E Medical Terminology 1 HITT 1310 Medical Terminology 3 KM3622* PIHS CNA & Phlebotomy 2 CE-CNA PIHS CNA & Phlebotomy Training Certification KM3632* PIHS II CNA & Phlebotomy 2 CE-CNA PIHS II CNA & Phlebotomy Certification KM4782E Precision Metal Manufacturing I 2 MCHN 1302 / MCHN 1343 Print Reading for Machine Trades/Machine Shop Mathematic 3/3 KM4792E Precision Metal Manufacturing II 2 MCHN 1338 / MCHN 1352 Basic Machine Shop/Intermediate Machining 3/3 KM5792E Auto Technology I: Maintenance & Light Repair 2 AUMT 1405/ AUMT 1407 Intro to Auto Tech/Automotive Electrical Systems 4/4 KM5802E Automotive Technology II: Automotive Service 2 AUMT 1410 / AUMT 1416 Automotive Brake Systems/Steering & Suspension Systems 4/4 * Requires one of the following minimum test scores to enroll: ENG 1301 Composition and Rhetoric I MATH 1314 College Algebra TSI Reading 351, Writing 340 and 4+ on Essay 350 OR a score of less than 340, and an ABE Diagnostic level of at least 4, an any essay score of at least 5 STAAR English III: Level II 2000+ Reading and Writing Algebra II: Level II 4000 ACT 19 (Composite 23) 19-22 (Composite 23 SAT 500 (Composite 1070) 500-549 (Composite 1070) CISD Approved Dual Credit Courses for Lone Star College 05/09/2018 12 High School Graduation Requirements Advanced Placement Conroe ISD encourages teachers, counselors, and principals to make equitable access a guiding principle for their advanced academic programs. Conroe ISD is committed to the principle that all students deserve an opportunity to participate in rigorous and academically challenging courses and programs. All students who are willing to accept the challenge of rigorous academic curriculum will be considered for admission into PreAP and AP courses. Conroe ISD encourages the elimination of barriers that restrict access to these programs for students from ethnic, racial, and socio-economic groups that have been traditionally underrepresented in the advanced programs. Advanced Placement (AP) This program gives students the opportunity to pursue college-level studies while still in high school and, depending on the student s score on the AP exam, to receive college advanced placement credit. All AP courses have received College Board authorization, and each course syllabus is available for review on the campus web page. (For more information refer to ). Students are expected to take the College Board Advanced Placement Tests in May. This cost could be reduced pending state funding. Please see your counselor for further details. Financial aid is available for students who sign up and qualify by the published deadline. Course credit or advanced placement credit is awarded by many colleges and universities to students who score a 3, 4, or 5 on the advanced placement examination. Students are encouraged to check with the colleges and universities they are interested in attending to learn more about AP score requirements ( ). Advanced Course Agreement Advanced Placement courses will require additional time commensurate with that expected of a college-level course. Students are urged to consider how much time they will need to prepare for the AP courses, other courses, and extracurricular activities prior to selecting courses. An Advanced Course Agreement must be signed by the parent as well as the student. The advanced course agreement states that the student is expected to remain in the requested level for the entire year. Under certain circumstances, a committee comprised of an administrator, parent(s), teacher, and student may meet at the end of the semester to evaluate current student progress and make an adjustment to the student s schedule, but any change will only be made on a space-available basis. 05/09/2018 13 High School Graduation Requirements Conroe Independent School District Student and Parent Agreement for Enrollment in Advanced Courses Pre-AP, AP, Dual Credit CISD encourages all students to enroll in available advanced classes to enhance their academic experience. Any CISD student may enroll in Pre AP, AP, or Dual Credit classes as his or her schedule permits. AP and Pre AP classes offer a high degree of rigor designed to prepare the student for success in higher academic pursuits. The purpose of a Pre AP course is to prepare students for college-level work which they will experience in AP classes. AP courses provide college-level instruction and culminate in AP exams that are designed by the College Board. Students who successfully complete AP exams may receive college credit. Characteristics of a Pre-AP, AP, Dual Credit class are: Student-initiated learning with an emphasis on strong work ethic; Rigorous academic content requiring advanced reading proficiency; More depth and complexity Application of content strategies Consistent use of higher-level thinking skills Analytical and Complex assignments Required commitment to course inside and outside of classroom College credit-bearing courses differ from regular high school courses in that instructors use advanced curricula that is outlined by the College Board and authorized through the College Board s audit process or as outlined and approved by the local community college. Pre-AP courses focus skill development, habits of mind, and in-depth preparation in a subject area that is necessary to master the skills required to achieve success in AP and Dual Credit courses. Other characteristics of advanced courses include content immersion, a fast pace, and assessment of performance at the analysis and synthesis levels. While we expect students to be very successful in Pre-AP, AP, or Dual Credit classes, a close look at the student s total course load and commitments to other activities should be taken into deliberation when choosing how many of these courses to take during a semester. For some students, the best way to begin moving into these courses is by beginning with one, until they better understand the expectations and time commitments involved. CISD strongly believes that Pre AP, AP, and Dual Credit courses provide enhanced academic opportunities for students that will assist them in future academic or nonacademic pursuits. At the same time, the District recognizes that students may experience initial surprise or difficulty in managing the increased course requirements. A struggling student and his/her parent/legal guardian should schedule a conference with the teacher and counselor in order to create strategies to be implemented over a period of time. To ensure students allow sufficient time to become acclimated to the classes and what the Pre AP, AP, or Dual Credit curriculum can offer, the District expects that any student who enrolls in the advanced course will remain in the course for the entire year. It is essential that the student give his/her maximum effort to succeed. At the end of the first semester, administration, parents, teacher, and student may evaluate the plan established earlier in the semester along with current student progress and may make an adjustment to the student s schedule. Any change will only be made on a space available basis. Student Agreement My signature below confirms that I am familiar with the expectations of the AP/Pre AP/Dual Credit course and accept its academic challenges. I agree to devote my best efforts to successfully complete the course. I understand this class offers increased rigor and challenge and I agree to request help when I need it and to attend tutorials if I fall behind in class assignments or experience difficulty with course content. I understand that my success in this AP/Pre AP course is primarily my responsibility. I understand and agree that a schedule change will only be considered after the first semester if the conditions stated above have been met. ___________________________________ ________________________________________ ________ ________________ Signature-Student Printed Name Date Signed Parent/Legal Guardian Agreement My signature below confirms that I have read and am familiar with the course description and syllabus for the AP/Pre AP/Dual Credit course. I understand that the course requires increased rigor and challenge and I agree to support and encourage my student to successfully complete this course. I will notify the teacher immediately of any concerns I have relating to the AP/Pre AP/Dual Credit class or my student s progress. I understand and agree that my student will only be considered for a schedule change after the first semester if the conditions stated above have been met. __________________________________ ________________________________________ _________ _________________ Signature Parent/Legal Guardian Printed Name Date Signed The Conroe Independent School District (District) as an equal opportunity educational provider and employer does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, or disability in educational programs or activities that it operates or in employment matters. The District is required by Title VI and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act, as well as Board policy not to discriminate in such a manner. For information about Title IX rights or Section 504/ADA rights, contact the Title IX Coordinator or the Section 504/ADA coordinator at 3205 W. Davis, Conroe, Texas 77304; (936) 709-7752 05/09/2018 14 High School Graduation Requirements Gifted and Talented Students identified to receive Gifted and Talented services are predominantly served through Pre Advanced Placement and Advanced Placement courses at the 9th and 10th grade levels and by Dual Credit and Advanced Placement courses at the 11th and 12th grade levels. Students not enrolled in these courses receive differentiated instruction to meet their educational needs. Information regarding testing for Gifted and Talented services may be obtained by contacting the campus counseling office. Special Education The goal of an effective special education program is to provide each special education student with an opportunity to be successful in the least restrictive, educational and/or work environments. A variety of instructional settings are used to promote academic and/or career and technology learning based on students individual needs and personal goals for adult life. Conroe ISD is committed to the instruction of academic competencies, personal growth, skills, and decision-making and problem solving skills that are recognized as critical for success in high school and adult independent living. To achieve these goals, an Individual Education Plan (IEP) will be developed for each student, with special education and/or regular education staff working together to modify materials or instruction determined as appropriate by the Admission, Review and Dismissal (ARD) Committee. Should you have any questions concerning the special education program, please call the counselor or special education diagnostician. Special Education Classes These courses are specially designed for students who have a modified curriculum in accordance with their individualized education plan (IEP). Homebound Services Referrals for consideration of homebound services through general education or the special education department are forwarded from the Response to Intervention (RtI) team. Students who will miss school for 4 or more weeks due to medical reasons may qualify for homebound services. It is an ARD/General Education Homebound Committee s decision to determine if a student meets eligibility criteria. Please contact your child s counselor for more information. Foreign Exchange Students The purpose of a foreign exchange program is cultural and social, not for graduation purposes. The District limits the number of foreign exchange students at each of its high schools through a waiver with the Texas Education Agency. The exchange student must reside within the school s attendance zone to be enrolled. Because of space limitations, foreign exchange students who have graduated from a comparable high school program in their home country are not eligible to be foreign exchange students in CISD. Foreign exchange students are classified as 11th grade students and are not placed on a graduation plan. Foreign exchange students in an EOC test course will be required to take STAAR EOC tests. Courses will be assigned upon registration. Foreign exchange students must meet the same guidelines for class placement and level changes as all other District students. All students who have English as a second language must be tested for English proficiency. Foreign exchange students who wish to apply for graduation must request an official transcript from the last school the student attended. Transcripts should be received prior to the student enrolling in the District. The transcript will be evaluated to determine eligibility for graduation. Foreign exchange students who apply for graduation must meet the same course and testing requirements as all other District students. 05/09/2018 15 College Readiness College Readiness How Can I Make Sure My Student Is College Ready? Students who take the most rigorous courses tend to be more successful on college entrance tests and in their college courses. Students who take more math show higher success rates. Students who spend time reading score higher on tests and perform better once on the college campus. Writing skills are very important across the curriculum. Knowing one s audience, writing concisely and in an organized, coherent manner is paramount. CISD has PSAT, SAT, and ACT prep courses available. Work on time management, self-advocacy, and persistence with your child. Four Key Dimensions of College Readiness Key Cognitive Strategies: Analytic reasoning, problem solving, inquisitiveness, precision, interpretation, evaluating claims. Key Content Knowledge: Writing skills, algebraic concepts, key foundational content, and big ideas from core subjects. Academic Behaviors (self-management): Persistence, time management, study group use, awareness of performance, self-advocacy. Contextual Skills and Awareness ( college knowledge ): Admissions requirements, cost of college, purpose and opportunities of college, types of colleges, college culture, interacting with professors. Measuring College Readiness Testing scores can denote college readiness: ACT English 18 Math 22 Reading 22 Science 23 Exemptions: ACT Composite 23 with minimum math of 19 and English 19 Students must also have graduated on the Recommended High School or Distinguished Achievement Plan (Cohort 2016 and 2017 only) in order to apply to a state 4-year institution (or meet the SAT or ACT requirements above). This applies to all students, including those in the top 10%. Testing Information STAAR Students are required to successfully complete Algebra I, English I, English II, Biology, and US History STAAR exams. More information regarding STAAR EOC can be found at PSAT The Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test is scheduled one time only during the third week in October. It is administered to sophomores and juniors during the school day. This practice test for the SAT is also the qualifying exam for the National Merit Scholarship Program, the National Hispanic Recognition Program, and the National Scholarship Service for African-American Students. It covers critical reading, writing, and math skills. It is a valuable predictor for success in higher level courses, for future SAT scores, and for success in college. Many scholarship and college applications ask for junior year PSAT scores. While only juniors are eligible for scholarship consideration, sophomores and freshmen may take the test for practice. Price: No charge to sophomores and juniors ACT The ACT is one of two college entrance exams required by most colleges and universities. The ACT tests skills in English, math, science, and reading. There is also a recommended 30-minute essay test available for an extra charge. Scores range from 1 to 36 on each section. Those scores are combined into a composite score which also ranges from 1 to 36. A score above 20 is generally in the top 50%. The ACT is administered on Saturdays about 6 times a year. Registration with ACT is required about six weeks in advance. Price: $ , plus $ for writing section New SAT Redesign The SAT Test is one of two college entrance exams required by most colleges and universities. The SAT tests Evidence Base Reading and Writing, Mathematics with an optional Essay. Evidence-base Reading and Writing range from 200 to 800 on each section. In addition, Math scores range from 200 to 800. The SAT is given on Saturdays several times a year. Registration with the College Board is required about six weeks in Cost of the SAT without essay: $ Cost of the SAT with essay: $ Fee Waivers are available. See your counselor for more information. 05/09/2018 16 College Readiness SAT Subject Tests The SAT Subject Tests are one-hour multiple choice tests. They provide the opportunity for students to demonstrate mastery of specific subjects in the areas of English, history, mathematics, science, and languages. Some colleges and universities require specific exams for admission or placement, and some award credit for high scores. Scores range from 200 to 800, with credit consideration typically given for scores above 560. Students should register for these tests after completing the highest level courses in the subject areas. The SAT Subject Tests are given on Saturdays about 6 times a year. Up to three exams may be taken on the same day, but the SAT Reasoning Test may not be taken on the same day. Registration with the College Board is required about six weeks in advance. Price: Basic registration $ Language with Listening Test adds $26. All other subject tests $16. AP Advanced Placement Exams The College Board AP exams are given once a year, in May, during the school day. Each three hour exam covers college level content in a specific course. The tests consist of both multiples choice and essay questions. Foreign Language exams include a speaking and listening section. Scores range from 1-5, with most colleges awarding credit for scores of 3 or better. Registration takes place in March in the counselors office. See page 11 for more details. TSI The State of Texas requires all students to demonstrate college level readiness in reading, math, and writing before taking any courses that count towards a college degree. Students may be exempt from this test with specified scores on either the STAAR, SAT, or ACT. This test is given on college campuses and offered in CISD. Pre-registration is required. Meeting TSI standards is also required for any dual credit classes. TSI is an untimed, computerized test used to qualify students for dual credit admissions. To check for test schedules and to register, go to . Price: Free of charge the first time. Retests are $10 per unit or $29 for the entire test. NOTE: Prices listed are subject to change. Check the website listed or your counselor for current information. Steps toward College Seventh Grade Fall o Begin investigating careers and college majors in Naviance Family Connection. o Start thinking about possible high school courses. Eighth Grade Fall o Take a career inventory in Naviance Family Connection (your counselor will give directions). o Take some courses for high school credit. Eighth Grade Spring o Study the high school courses available. Look at PreAP, Advanced Placement, and Dual Credit opportunities. o Create your 4-year plan in View-IT (Student Access Center). Be ready to declare an endorsement for your electives area. You CAN change your mind before your junior year. o Listen carefully as counselors visit with you about high school classes, keeping in mind future plans for college and/or career. o College information can be accessed through Naviance Family Connection and other websites, such as College for All Texans ( ). o Continue your college and career search through Naviance Family Connection. Freshman Year Fall o Focus on the importance of high school and make good academic decisions. o Become familiar with careers that relate to your abilities and interests through Naviance Family Connection. o Get involved in extracurricular activities sponsored by your school and/or community. Make note of time involved, leadership roles, and activities. o Keep a portfolio/resume listing all your activities, awards, honors, and leadership roles. o Be responsible for your education. Make sure your academic grades reflect your true ability and efforts. Take courses at the most challenging level you can. o Talk with your parents about planning for college costs. o Get to know your counselor! He/she will write letters of recommendation for college/scholarships/careers o Visit the College and Career Center on your campus and meet the counselor there. o Participate in College Night. Freshman Year Spring o Adjust your four-year plan as necessary in Naviance Family Connection and make informed course selections for your sophomore year. o Continue to research careers, majors and colleges in Naviance Family Connection, and visit college campuses when you have the opportunity. Sophomore Year Fall o Continue to focus on the importance of high school and make good academic decisions. o Visit college websites and even college campuses when you get the opportunity. o Do your best on the PSAT in October. It is free for all sophomores and given during the school day. Fee Waivers are available. See your counselor for more information. Fee Waivers are available. See your counselor for more information. Fee Waivers are available. See your counselor for more information. 05/09/2018 17 College Readiness o Be responsible for your education. Make sure your academic grades reflect your true ability and efforts. Take courses at the most challenging level you can. o Continue to talk with your parents about planning for college costs. o Get involved in activities outside the classroom. Work toward leadership positions in activities you like best. o Make a visit to your counselor establish a strong connection. o Visit the College and Career Center. o Attend District College Night. o Continue to do your research on careers, majors, and colleges in Naviance Family Connection. Sophomore Year Spring o Continue to monitor college/work and/or technical training entrance requirements for changes. Modify your four-year plan in Naviance Family Connection as these change or as you change your focus. Be flexible and proactive! o Continue to research careers, majors, and colleges and the requirements of each through Naviance Family Connection and by visiting the institutions websites. Begin to narrow down choices. o Start looking at scholarship and financial aid options for when you are a senior. o Meet with your counselor and visit the College and Career Center. Junior Year Fall o Use Naviance Family Connection for college information to help you start narrowing your college/technical school/career choices. o If interested in a military career, be sure to visit with local recruiters and/or get information about starting the military academy application process. o Do your best on the PSAT in October. The district pays for all juniors to take the test. This is the qualifying test for National Merit Semifinalists. o Continue to visit college and/or technical school campuses. Begin to focus on what you are really looking for in a post-secondary experience. o Speak to college representatives who visit your high school. o Continue to focus on the importance of high school and make good academic decisions. o Be responsible for your education. Make sure your academic grades reflect your true ability and efforts. Take courses at the most challenging level you can handle. o Research all financial aid, scholarships, loans, and grants that are available, through institutions, as well as through public/private agencies, churches, and organizations. o Through Naviance Family Connection, continue to research college requirements, tuition and fees, other costs, student activities, course offerings, financial aid, etc. for any institutions in which you are interested. o Continue to visit with your counselor and spend time in the College and Career Center. o Participate in the District College Night. Junior Year Spring o Continue to conference with your counselor to make sure you are on track for graduation. o Update your 4-year plan in Naviance Family Connection. o Take the SAT, ACT, and/or SAT Subject Tests. o Check your class rank in Naviance Family Connection. Remember, colleges like upward trends. o Make good choices in selecting senior year classes. Consider an AP class. Do NOT plan to slack off your senior year. o Begin work on your college essays. o Register for and take appropriate AP exams. o Stay involved with your extracurricular activities. o Visit campuses of those institutions in which you are interested. o Continue to research information about colleges, careers, and majors in Naviance Family Connection. Senior Year Fall o Be responsible for your own education. Make sure your academic grades reflect your true ability and efforts. Take courses at the most challenging level you can. o Take SAT or ACT again if necessary and SAT Subject Tests, if required by your college. o Perfect college essays. o Make final decisions about institutions to which you will apply. Begin the application process, paying close attention to deadlines. Be sure to turn in requests for processing 2 to 3 weeks in advance. o Track your college applications and scholarship applications through Naviance Family Connection. o Ask for letters of recommendation in a timely manner. Remember, teachers and counselors have many letters to write, so give them ample time to craft a letter that will showcase you in the best way possible. o Observe housing and financial aid deadlines. o Request and track transcripts through Naviance Family Connection. Be sure requests are made well ahead of time. o Research scholarship opportunities in Naviance Family Connection, and apply to as many as you qualify for. o Attend Financial Aid Night. o Pay close attention to audition and portfolio deadlines, which may differ from actual application deadlines. Senior Year - Spring o Continue to complete and submit scholarship applications. o Complete and submit the FAFSA. o Register for and take AP exams. o Do NOT let down during the last semester. You still have to send a final transcript! o Complete the senior exit survey in Naviance Family Connection. o Be sure all your college acceptances and scholarship awards are recorded in Naviance Family Connection and that you complete your Senior Survey. This is intended to encourage you to think about your future. Always seek information from parents, teachers, counselors, and college personnel. Ask questions! 05/09/2018 18 College Readiness NCAA Guidelines for College-Bound Athletes The NCAA Guide for the college-bound student athlete can be downloaded at Contact campus NCAA designee. Exploring Post-Secondary Options In addition to online resources and those available from the counseling center at your campus, Conroe ISD offers several venues to assist you in planning for post-secondary pursuits 1. College Night, held during the month of September, gives students and their parents an opportunity to visit with representatives from colleges and universities throughout the United States. Basic financial aid information is also presented. 2. Financial Aid seminars offer information related to financial need and explores such topics as completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), types of financial aid available, and other concerns of parents trying to pay for post-secondary education and training. Speakers at Financial Aid seminars present information to parents in all phases of saving for college. 3. Military Academies Night is for those students interested in pursuing appointments to one of the five military academies throughout the United States. Information covered includes a general background about what programs of study are available at each academy and how to proceed with applying to these academies. While all students are welcome, it is recommended that those seriously considering an appointment to an academy attend one of these meetings as early in their high school program as possible. 4. Campus-led informational nights are offered by each secondary campus for assisting students with college and financial aid information. Please see your counselor for more information. 05/09/2018 19 Career Workplace Preparation Career and Technical Education The 16 Career Clusters A career cluster is a group of occupations and industries in related fields of study. Texas has adopted 16 career clusters. Within each cluster are pathways which are more specific groupings of similar occupations. To prepare for these occupations, students would select a program of study which in high school involves course selection. The goal is to have a seamless course of study from high school into college or other postsecondary education or training program. The electives students choose can complement their academic classes to prepare them for the challenges of the real world. An in-depth look at the clusters can be viewed online at these websites: and Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources The production, processing, marketing, distribution, financing, and development of agricultural commodities and resources including food, fiber, wood products, natural resources, horticulture, and other plant and animal products/resources. Architecture & Construction Careers in designing, planning, managing, building and maintaining the built environment. Arts, A/V Technology & Communications Designing, producing, exhibiting, performing, writing, and publishing multimedia content including visual and performing arts and design, journalism, and entertainment services. Business Management & Administration Business Management and Administration careers encompass planning, organizing, directing and evaluating business functions essential to efficient and productive business operations. Business Management and Administration career opportunities are available in every sector of the economy. Education & Training Planning, managing and providing education and training services, and related learning support services. Finance Planning, services for financial and investment planning, banking, insurance, and business financial management. Government & Public Administration Executing governmental functions to include Governance; National Security; Foreign Service; Planning; Revenue and Taxation; Regulation; and Management and Administration at the local, state, and federal levels. Health Science Planning, managing, and providing therapeutic services, diagnostic services, health informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development. Hospitality & Tourism Hospitality & Tourism encompasses the management, marketing and operations of restaurants and other foodservices, lodging, attractions, recreation events and travel-related services. Human Services Preparing individuals for employment in career pathways that relate to families and human needs. Information Technology Building linkages in IP occupations framework; for entry level, technical, and professional careers related to the design, development, support and management of hardware, software, multimedia, and systems integration services. Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security Planning, managing, and providing legal, public safety, protective services and homeland security, including professional and technical support services. Manufacturing Planning, managing and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final products and related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance and manufacturing/process engineering. Marketing Planning, managing, and performing marketing activities to reach organizational objectives. Science, Technology, Engineering & Materials Planning, managing, and providing scientific research and professional and technical services ( , physical science, social science, engineering) including laboratory and resting services, and research and development services. Transportation, Distribution & Logistics Planning, management, and movement of people, materials, and goods by road, pipeline, air, rail and water and related professional and technical support services such as transportation infrastructure planning and management, logistics services, mobile equipment and facility maintenance. 05/09/2018 20 Career Workplace Preparation Career and Technical Education Courses The District offers career and technical education programs in a variety of areas. Courses offered are listed in the Career and Technical Education section of this guide. These courses are designed to meet a variety of needs and interests in technical and practical areas. Students from all academic levels enroll in these courses that integrate academic and application skills. Lone Star College Montgomery and Conroe ISD have established the method by which students in identified technical preparatory classes will receive credit toward certain programs and/or degrees when the student completes high school and is enrolled in the program at the college. The District will take steps to ensure that lack of English language skills will not be a barrier to admission and participation in all educational and career and technology programs. Students who complete Career and Technical Education courses may obtain the following industry certifications and licenses. However, due to instructional requirements, time in class may be limited to pursue certification. For more information on the certifications and licenses available, consult your counselor or Career and Technical Education teacher. Course Number Course Certifications K100 Principles of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources OSHA, First Aid, Junior Master Gardener K103H Small Animal Management Canine Care & Training Program K105 Veterinary Medical Applications Certified Veterinary Assistant K112 Food Technology and Safety ServSafe K113 Food Processing ServSafe K114 Wildlife, Fisheries & Ecology Management Hunter/Boater Safety, TPWD Hunter Education K117 Floral Design Floral Certification K121 Agricultural Mechanics and Metal Technologies AWS Structural Steel K122 Agricultural Structures Design & Fabrication AWS Structural Steel K1242 Practicum in Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Certified Veterinary Assistant K1562 Architectural Design II Autodesk-ACAD, Autodesk-Revit, Apprentice Architectural Drafter Exam, Chief Architect K1612 Construction Technology I OSHA, NCCER K1622 Construction Technology II NCCER K202 Animation II Autodesk 3ds MAX or Autodesk Maya K204 Audio/Video Production II Adobe Premier Pro K208 Graphic Design and Illustration II Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, In Design, Fireworks, or Flash K252 Business Information Management I Dual Credit. MOS (Microsoft Office Specialist) Word certification offered; some students may also begin MOS Excel and PowerPoint training K253 Business Information Management II MOS (Microsoft Office Specialist) Word, Excel PowerPoint or Access certification offered K305 Accounting II MS Office Excel certification, Peach Tree, or Quick Books K350 Principles of Health Science CPR and/or First Aid K352 Health Science Theory CPR and/or First Aid - CCMA K3482 PIHS Pharmacy Tech Certified Pharmacy Technician K3492 PIHS II Pharmacy Tech Certified Pharmacy Technician KM3622 PIHS CNA & Phlebotomy Certified Nurse s Assistant/Phlebotomy KM3632 PIHS II CNA & Phlebotomy Certified Nurse s Assistant/Phlebotomy K377 Introduction to Culinary Arts OSHA K3792 Culinary Arts ServSafe K403H Lifetime Nutrition & Wellness ServSafe 05/09/2018 21 Career Workplace Preparation Course Number Course Certifications K405 Child Development CPR and/or First Aid K4062 Child Guidance CCEI Childhood Credential Certificate K2772 Instructional Practices CCEI Childhood Credential Certificate K2782 Practicum in Education and Training CCEI Childhood Credential Certificate, PreProfessional Assessment and Certification K4122 & K420 Cosmetology II & Principles of Cosmetology Design and Color Theory State Board License K426 Computer Maintenance A+ K437 Internetworking I Cisco CCNA K438 Internetworking II Cisco CCNA K451 Law Enforcement I OSHA K452 Law Enforcement II 9-1-1 Telecommunication K454 Court Systems & Practices 9-1-1 Telecommunication K4642 EMT/Clinicals Emergency Medical Technician K475 Principles of Manufacturing OSHA, NCCER K4762 Welding I AWS Structural Steel Code Position, Metal Welding Code Position K4772 Welding II AWS Structural Steel Code Position, NCCER, Sheet Metal Welding Code Position, GMAW, SMAW K4782E Precision Metal Manufacturing I NIMS Varies K4792E Precision Metal Manufacturing II NIMS Varies K5052 Marketing Dynamics A*S*K-Concepts of Finance, Fundamentals of Business Concepts, Fundamentals of Marketing Concepts K5062 Practicum in Marketing Dynamics I A*S*K-Concepts of Finance, Fundamentals of Business Concepts, Fundamentals of Marketing Concepts K5292 Engineering Design & Presentation II Autodesk-ACAD, Autodesk-Inventor K5792 Automotive Technology: Maintenance & Light Repair SIP2 Automotive K5802 Automotive Technology II Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Advanced Technical Credit Program (ATC) Students who plan to attend a community college may want to consider taking one or more articulated courses which can count toward an Associate of Applied Science degree (such as Automotive Technology, Paralegal Studies, Nursing, Veterinary Technology, and many others). Course articulation is dependent upon teacher certification. Students may take articulated courses their freshman or sophomore years, but must take an articulated course in their junior and/or senior year in order for those courses to be counted at the college level. The Lone Star College System has partnered with universities across Texas to build articulation agreements for graduates with AAS degrees. This will allow them to pick up immediately at the university where they left off at the community college. Students who think they might be interested in taking these classes should see their counselors. 05/09/2018 22 Grading and Class Rank System Grading and Class Rank System Grade Point System, Class Rank, and Other Grade-Related Issues In an effort to recognize those students who have taken a more rigorous course of study, CISD has developed the following system for calculating GPA s: Grade Range Letter Semester Grade *AP/DC **PreAP/H/DC Level & All Other Courses 90-100 A 80-89 B 75-79 C 70-74 D Below 70 F 0 0 0 *Includes all AP courses plus dual credit required core courses taught on the high school campus. **Dual credit Spanish taught on the high school campus. Summa Cum Laude: Students who rank in the top 5% of their class according to GPA and have been enrolled in a CISD high school since January of their junior (11th grade) year. Magna Cum Laude: Students who rank between the top 5% and 10% of their class according to GPA Cum Laude: Students who rank between the top 10% and 15% of their class according to GPA. Beginning with sophomore year, students will receive class ranks (in Naviance Family Connection) each semester. Midyear Senior ranks will be released as quickly as possible after the end of the first semester (usually the end of January). Final senior rank is determined mid-April, which will include the first nine weeks grades of the second semester in order for campuses to determine graduation honors before graduation. Midyear graduates are included in the senior class membership in order to maximize the total number of end-of-year awards/honors. Ranks are based on semester grades. State Awards 1. Students must be selected from the Summa Cum Laude graduates. 2. In the event that two or more students have the same grade point average, the awards will be determined by calculating numerical averages. GPA Exempt Courses Conroe ISD strives to encourage students to pursue their areas of special talents and interests to enrich their academic experiences and achievements. The GPA exemption is in place to allow students to exempt up to two credits during their high school career in campus based programs. We believe this will foster continued and increased involvement in extra-curricular programs and ensure that all of our students have access to a well-rounded education. For more information regarding GPA Exempt Courses, refer to the GPA Exempt Courses flyer. Grades All semester grades for any courses taken are entered on the transcript. Grades are closed one semester after the end of any course. (Due to summer schedules, questions may be submitted for grades earned the final grading period until August 1 of the same year.) Since grade changes affect GPA, and ultimately the ranks of other students, it is very important to take care of these issues in a timely manner. Transcripts Grades for all courses taken are placed on the transcript and may not be removed. This includes courses taken at the junior high campuses for high school credit; however, junior high school courses are not calculated in the high school rank any courses taken after completion of 8th grade are calculated in class rank. 05/09/2018 23 Grading and Class Rank System The transcript is the official student academic record. Transcripts include grades and credits for all courses attempted, grade point averages, class rank, and standardized state test scores. Transcripts for currently enrolled students can be requested through the appropriate campus office. Students 18 years and older must give written permission in order for a parent or other party to receive a transcript. Unofficial transcripts may be requested by the student and/or parent or guardian and given directly to the person requesting it. Students may make copies of their unofficial transcripts. Official transcripts are transmitted directly from the campus to an authorized requesting institution. Official transcripts must be mailed by the registrar of the campus and may not be delivered by hand. Courses Taken for No Credit or Retaken for Mastery All courses taken receive a grade and are shown on the transcript. Courses taken and passed for the first time are computed in the rank. Any course previously passed and retaken for mastery will show on the transcript with the grade received but is not computed in the rank. Any course taken by a student counts in determining eligibility for no pass/no play purposes. Grade Averaging for 2-Semester Courses High school students failing the first semester of a two-semester course, but who pass the second semester of that course, shall receive credit for both semesters when the average of the two semesters of the course is at least 70. Students who pass the first semester but fail the second semester must repeat the second semester of the course. Students passing the first semester of a math or a LOTE course, but failing the second semester, must repeat the second semester in an approved summer school course earning a passing grade, or repeat the entire course the following school year (taking the first semester for no credit) earning a passing grade of 70 or better for the second semester. Grade Level Classification Requirements The listing below is a summary of the minimum number of state credits needed to be classified as a Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, or Senior: Freshman 0 - 5 .5 credits Sophomore 6-11 .5 credits Junior 12 - 17 .5 credits Senior 18 credits Students are reclassified during July at the end of each school year. An exception could be made for 11th grade students who file an early graduation plan with the counselor at the end of the tenth grade year. These students will be reclassified to the twelfth grade after the first term of their junior year if they are in the process of meeting all graduation requirements by May of that year. Check with your child s counselor for more information about early graduation. Local credit, which does appear on the transcript, is not included in determining credits for grade level classification and class rank. Transfers and Transfer of Credit Credit is awarded when an official transcript is received from the previous accredited school attended. Credit is awarded for all courses recognized by the Texas Education Agency. In order for home schooling or private school course credit(s) to be awarded, one of the following criteria must be met: 1. Transcript received from an accredited school. 2. Transcript received from a non-accredited home school, non-accredited private school, or other organization, and A. Documentation of the curriculum followed and work completed by the student in each subject area must be provided. This documentation is reviewed based on the Texas curriculum guidelines (TEKS). Examples of documentation include: Curriculum Followed Lesson or unit plans Course syllabi Course goals and objectives Course scope and sequence 05/09/2018 24 Grading and Class Rank System Work Completed Tests and results Journals Videos Portfolios Laboratory reports Progress reports Art work projects If documentation is determined to be insufficient, credit-by-exams will be administered in the highest level of core classes completed in home school. If the student scores a 70 or above, credit will be awarded for all credits from the home school that match the state requirements just as in any other transfer classes. 1. Credit by examinations in each individual subject area are per semester (1/2) credit. The cost of the examination(s) is the covered by the school. 2. A secondary student assessed by credit-by-examination should be given adequate time to prepare for the test, particularly if multiple subject examinations are required. 3. Grades recorded on the transcript will be those recorded by the home school or unaccredited school transcript. If no grades are sent, P s will be awarded. In determining whether a transfer grade should receive the extra grade points awarded similar courses at the receiving school, the following criteria will be used: 1. The sending school must be accredited and the course in question must be recorded on the transcript as above level ( Honors or AP), and 2. The receiving school must offer that course at the same level. These criteria will be used for both intra-district transfers as well as inter-district transfers. Grade Transcription Often a student may enter from another school that has a different grading system from CISD. In that case, grades will be transcribed in the following manner: 1. Convert numerical grade to sending school s letter equivalent. 2. Convert letter equivalent to our grading scale. Example: An incoming student s grading scale is 94-100=A 85-93 =B 78-84 =C 70-77 =D If that student has a 91 in English 91= B (85) with appropriate grade points. The scale to be used is: A+ 98 A 95 A- 92 B+ 88 B 85 B- 82 C+ 79 C 77 C- 75 D+ 74 D 72 D- 70 F 65 For those grading systems which award credit for grades in the 60 s, those grades will be recorded as 70 . If any parent or student has a concern about the effect of this transcription on college admissions, the issue can be addressed in a counselor letter which, along with a copy of the former school s transcript, can be attached to the present transcript and mailed with each application. Grades from Other Countries Foreign transcripts will be evaluated in the following manner: 1. Transcripts from American or International schools with grading systems equivalent to the District s will be transcribed as any other domestic transcript. Every effort will be made to transcribe to CISD s numeric grading system. 2. Transcripts that reflect grading systems dissimilar to the District s will be evaluated and grades of P or F will be awarded. These grades will not be assigned grade points nor computed in the student s GPA. 3. For those records coming from countries who administer examinations rather than award 05/09/2018 25 Grading and Class Rank System course grades, course curriculum will be evaluated, examination grades noted, and P s recorded for equivalent courses on the receiving campus. Academic Lettering Academic awards including academic lettering are presented only to students currently enrolled in the District. Students meeting the following are eligible to receive an application for academic lettering: 1. A sophomore student having a cumulative average of 90 for all subjects or a GPA of or greater during his/her freshman year is eligible to receive a jacket and/or letter with no bars; 2. A junior student having a cumulative average of 90 for all subjects or a GPA of or greater during his/her sophomore year is eligible for a letter jacket and/or letter with no bars; 3. A senior student having a cumulative average of 90 for all subjects or a GPA of or greater during his/her junior year is eligible for a letter jacket or a letter with the appropriate number of bars. 4. Transfer students will become eligible to receive the appropriate award only after completing one full year at a District high school in which the grade requirements (as outlined above) are met and their transfer grades meet the grade requirements of the award. The award will be given the fall semester of the following school year. 5. A student must complete the academic letter application and return it to the campus counseling center by the designated date. A student may receive only one jacket during his or her high school career. 6. Students must be currently enrolled to receive a jacket or a letter. Eligibility for Extracurricular Activities At the end of the first six weeks, any student receiving a grade below a 70 in any class (except those identified as Advanced see list below) is ineligible until the end of the nine-week grading period. If passing all classes at that time, the student will regain eligibility. From that point forward, students may lose eligibility at the end of each nine weeks. (Nine weeks grade in each course determines eligibility, not semester exams or semester averages.) At the end of a semester, eligibility of the student is determined by the Nine Weeks Grade, not the semester exam or the Semester Average. Eligibility can be regained at the three-week progress report if the student is passing all classes with a 70 or better. There is a one-week grace period before a student loses or regains eligibility. Students who score below a 70 in certain advanced courses (listed below) may petition the building principal for a waiver. All decisions by the principal are final. For additional information regarding No Pass, No Play, consult the TEA UIL Side by Side at 05/09/2018 26 Grading and Class Rank System Conroe ISD courses which may be waived in accordance with campus procedures and with principal approval (Advanced Classes Identified for No Pass, No Play Exemption): Approved High School Courses: May waive no more than 2 courses per grading period. Advanced Placement Courses: All Dual Credit Core Courses: All English: English I PreAP English II PreAP Mathematics: Geometry PreAP Algebra II PreAP Precalculus Precalculus PreAP Science: Biology PreAP Chemistry PreAP Organic Chemistry Honors Anatomy and Physiology Honors Advanced Biotechnology Honors Medical Microbiology Honors Pathophysiology Honors Social Studies: World Geography PreAP LOTE: Spanish III PreAP French III PreAP German III PreAP Latin III PreAP Japanese III PreAP Chinese III PreAP Computer Science: Computer Science PreAP Approved Junior High School Courses: May only waive 1 course per grading period. English: PreAP Language Arts Mathematics: PreAP Math Algebra I Geometry Science: PreAP Science Social Studies: PreAP Texas History PreAP History 05/09/2018 27 Selection of Courses for Next Year Selection of Courses for Next Year General Information In the course description section, you will find a brief description of every course offered in Conroe ISD high schools as well as any possible prerequisites. Students are urged to carefully plan their course selections. Although students will receive specific instructions and assistance from school counselors during the preregistration process, the responsibility for selecting appropriate career and graduation choices rests with students and parents. It is very important that students and parents give careful consideration to selecting appropriate courses. The choices students make determine the master schedule of course offerings available. The master schedule is designed to maximize student opportunities and minimize scheduling conflicts. Elective Courses Elective courses are offered and will be taught dependent upon the number of students who sign up for each course. While selecting courses for the next school year, a student should also choose alternate electives which will be substituted in the event that the first choice elective is not being taught, is full, or conflicts with a required course. The number of elective offerings is based upon students selections in the spring. Students who fail to list alternates will be placed in available courses which will fill the student s schedule. These courses are not eligible to be changed. In the case of limited space availability for an elective class, seats will be awarded based on grade level classification with preference given to upperclassmen. Local Credit Courses Courses receiving local credit do not qualify as state requirements for graduation or count for determining grade level classification. This means that local credit courses do not count toward graduation. The student s counselor can best assist in determining whether or not the individual should take a local credit course. While local credit courses do not count toward graduation requirements and classification purposes, these courses do count for no pass/no play eligibility for extracurricular activities. Schedule Changes Principals select and hire teachers and create the master schedule based on the student course requests. Because these selections determine the schedule, student schedule changes will be made if only placement mistake has been made. Students receive a verification of the courses that they have selected in the spring. At that time, they will have the opportunity to change selections. Changes after this time will be done only if students have not taken the required prerequisites for a course or who have been misplaced in a course. In the event of a student being placed in the wrong course, he/she must continue to attend the scheduled class until the counselor makes the schedule correction. When a semester begins, administrative changes sometimes occur due to an imbalance of numbers in classes. Students should choose electives and alternates carefully. Those decisions are binding. Each campus sets the deadlines for submitting course changes. Level Changes CISD strongly believes that PreAP, AP, and Dual Credit courses provide enhanced academic opportunities for students that will assist them in future academic or nonacademic pursuits. At the same time, the District recognizes that students may experience initial surprise or difficulty in managing the increased course requirements. A struggling student and his/her parent/legal guardian should schedule a conference with the teacher and counselor in order to create strategies to be implemented over a period of time. To ensure students allow sufficient time to become acclimated to the classes and what the PreAP and AP curriculum can offer, the District expects that any student who enrolls in the PreAP or AP class will remain in the course for the entire year. It is essential that the student give his/her maximum effort to succeed. At the end of the first semester, administration, the parents, teacher, and student may evaluate the plan established earlier in the semester and current student progress and may make an adjustment to the student s schedule. Any change will only be made on a space available basis. 05/09/2018 28 Selection of Courses for Next Year Examples of Typical Courses of Study for Core Content Courses Typical Course Selection Options for English, Grades 9-12 Grade 9 Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12 ________________________________________ ________________________________________ _________ Typical Course Selection Options for Social Studies, Grades 9-12 Grade 9 Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12 For students with advanced English skills or identified as gifted in English English I PreAP English II PreAP English Language and Composition AP English Literature AP English I PreAP English II PreAP English III Honors English III DC English IV Dual Credit For students who perform successfully in English English I English II English III Honors English IV Dual Credit or English IV Honors English I English II English III English IV For students with advanced Social Studies skills or identified as gifted in Social Studies World Geography PreAP or AP Human Geo World History AP US History AP Government AP Macroeconomics AP World Geography PreAP World History Honors US History Honors or US History Dual Credit Government Honors Economics Honors or Government DC Economics DC For students who perform successfully in Social Studies World Geography World History US History Government Economics Social Studies Electives Special Topic/AP Human Geography, European History AP, Psychology, Sociology, Teen Leadership Personal Financial Literacy Special Topic/AP Human Geography, European History AP, Psychology AP, Psychology, Sociology, Teen Leadership Personal Financial Literacy Special Topic/AP Human Geography, European History AP, Psychology AP, Psychology, Sociology, Teen Leadership Personal Financial Literacy Teen Leadership 05/09/2018 29 Selection of Courses for Next Year Typical Course Selection Options for Science, Grades 9-12 Grade 9 Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12 ________________________________________ ________________________________________ _________ Typical Course Selection Options for Math, Grades 9-12 Grade 8 Grade 9 Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12 *NOTE: The following courses may also count as a fourth math credit: Mathematical Applications in Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources (must be taken as a fourth math course prior to Algebra II), Engineering Mathematics, Statistics and Risk Management, Advanced Quantitative Reasoning, AP Computer Science. For students with advanced Science skills or identified as gifted in Science Biology PreAP Chemistry PreAP Physics I AP 4th Science Credit Biology Chemistry Physics or Principles of Technology For students who perform successfully in Science For students with advanced Math skills (Algebra I in 7th grade) Algebra II PreAP Precalculus PreAP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC AP Statistics AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC AP Statistics AP Multi Variable Calculus Algebra I Geometry PreAP Algebra II PreAP Precalculus PreAP For students with advanced Math skills (Algebra I in 8th grade) PreAlgebra Algebra I Geometry Calculus AB AP Calculus BC AP Statistics AP For students who perform successfully in Math Algebra II Math Models IS: Engineering Mathematics, IS: Research Project in Mathematics, Advanced Quantitative Reasoning *Algebra II Precalculus Statistics AP College Algebra H College Algebra DC Geometry PreAP Math Electives 4th Science Credit 05/09/2018 30 Other Credit Opportunities Other Credit Opportunities Campus Permission Students who wish to take any course outside of the traditional schedule must get administrative approval. The District permits high school students to take up to two credits via correspondence courses, virtual on-line courses, credits-by-exam, dual credit, summer school and any college summer programs. This allows the school the opportunity to evaluate the program to determine what, if any, credit can be awarded. For graduating seniors, all courses required for graduation taken outside the school day must be completed by the beginning of the second semester. This includes the course final. Correspondence/Virtual/Online Courses Correspondence courses are courses taken through the mail or online for high school credit. Typically students are permitted to only take elective offerings. Students are not permitted to take core academic subjects by correspondence and may be enrolled in only one correspondence course at a time. The campus principal must approve any exceptions. Correspondence courses must be taken from state-accredited institutions of higher education and require approval prior to enrollment. This includes the course final. NCAA eligibility may be affected. Students should be aware that no pass/no play rules are applicable to classes taken outside of the regular day for high school purposes. Failing a correspondence course will result in ineligibility. The Texas Virtual School Network (TxVSN) has been established as one method of distance learning. A student has the option, with certain limitations, to enroll in a course offered through the TxVSN to earn course credit for graduation. In limited circumstances, a student in grade 8 may also be eligible to enroll in a course through the TxVSN. A student who enrolls in a TxVSN course for which an end-of-course (EOC) assessment is required, the student must still take the corresponding EOC assessment. Students interested in taking online courses must see their counselor for information. It is important for students to know that online courses are rigorous, and are 100% TEKS aligned. Correspondence, Virtual, and Online learning course grades are entered on the student s transcript and counted in the GPA calculation as level grade points unless the course is approved as an Advanced Placement course. Distance learning courses count toward academic UIL No Pass/No Play eligibility and are evaluated in accordance with the District eligibility calendar that can be found on the District s website. Students should be aware that virtual or online courses may not count towards NCAA eligibility. It is recommended students go to the link , and take the SmarterMeasure Assessment to determine their potential for success with online courses. A student should be serious when taking an online course, and should exhibit some of the following attributes and skills in order to be successful when taking an online course: self-starter, effective time manager, proficient in the use of technology, self-disciplined, keyboarding skills. Credit by Exam The National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA) guide states that these examinations do not count for core Grade Point Average in determining eligibility. There are two types of Credit by Exam: Credit by Exam for Credit Recovery (taken class and failed or not completed) A student who has received prior instruction in a course or subject, but did not receive credit for it may, in certain circumstances, be permitted to earn credit by passing an exam on the essential knowledge and skills defined for the course or subject. To receive credit, a student must score at least 70 on the exam. The attendance review committee may offer a student with excessive absences an opportunity to earn credit for a course by passing an exam. A student may not use this exam to regain 05/09/2018 31 Other Credit Opportunities eligibility to participate in extracurricular activities. Students may not take a credit by exam for the purpose of recovering credit while they are still enrolled in the course. For seniors, this means that students are not eligible to take an exam for recovering credit until the final exams begin. Students are responsible for the cost of this exam. The student will have the grade and grade point of the test recorded on his/her transcript. Credit by Exam for Acceleration (has not taken class before) Note: This option is not available for EOC courses. A student will be permitted to take an exam to earn credit for an academic course for which the student has not had prior instruction. The student must score an 80 or above in order to receive credit. These scores are not computed in the Grade Point Average (GPA). These exams will be scheduled four times per year. Consult your child s counselor for specific times and locations. If a student plans to take an exam for credit recovery, the student or parent must register with the counselor no later than 30 days prior to the scheduled testing date. If the student plans to take an exam for acceleration, the student or parent must register online on the CISD website. High School Courses Taken in Junior High All grades for high school courses taken in junior high school will appear on the high school transcript. High school courses taken during the 7th and/or 8th grades will be given the actual grade on the transcript, but the grades will not count in the calculation of the student s high school grade point average (GPA). Any course taken after completion for 8th grade are calculated in class rank. High school credit will be awarded if a student passes the course. Credits for high school courses are awarded in half-credit units. Students may earn high school credit for the course only once. Campus Computer-Assisted Courses Students taking courses on the computer to recover a semester (or more) credit for a course previously failed, will be awarded a numeric grade and grade points for that computer-assisted course. Principal (or his/her designee) approval must be received for a student to take any computer-assisted course as a first time offering. Courses taken as a first time offering will earn grade points and be calculated in class rank. Off Campus Physical Education Program Guidelines The purpose of the Off Campus Physical Education (OCPE) program is to accommodate students participating in individual sports and are making serious efforts to develop higher-level skills in a specific activity that exceeds what the school district can offer through the general physical education program. The OCPE program allows students in 7th through 12th grades to earn credits that meet the district and state physical education graduation requirements. Students are expected to be physically educated, along with being physically active. Students are expected to show accountability of skill development as well as learned physical activity. Knowledge of Health concepts and age appropriate social development are also requirements of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Physical Education. Category I: Olympic/National Level - for Junior High and High School: The Off Campus Physical Education online, enrollment window opens on Monday, March 19, 2018, and closes on Tuesday, May 1, 2018. 1. Participation includes a minimum of 15 hours per week of highly intensive, professional, supervised training. 2. Participation hours are achieved only during instructional time not for competitive or game events. Animal care and grooming do not apply to participation hours. 3. The training facility, instructors, and the activities involved in the program must be certified by the superintendent as highly qualified. 4. Students qualifying and participating at this level may be dismissed from school one hour at the end of the day. No team sports. Students dismissed may not miss any class other than physical education. 5. Off campus physical education is only available to students participating in individual sports. 6. High school students are not eligible to participate in programs that the UIL offers in CISD. 7. Off campus physical education requires a year-long commitment. 8. Students who drop out of the program prior to the end of semester will be scheduled into a campus physical education class. No credit is awarded. 05/09/2018 32 Other Credit Opportunities 9. Students are not allowed to change facilities or activity programs during the year without district approval. 10. Different programs may not be combined to meet Category I minimum time requirements. 11. Transportation is not provided by CISD. 12. Background checks are not provided by CISD. 13. Students are responsible for all fees associated with the activity. Category II: Junior High and High School: Online Applications, will be available to students on Monday, March 19, 2018. Completed online applications are due no later than Tuesday, May 1, 2018. 1. Participation includes a minimum of 5 hours, but less than 15 hours per week at a private or commercially sponsored agency that provides physical activities which include those certified by the superintendent to be of a high quality and well supervised by highly qualified instructors. 2. Off campus physical education is only available to students participating in individual sports. Team sports are not eligible for this program. 3. High school students are not eligible to participate in programs that the UIL offers in CISD. 4. Students participating in Category II waivers may not be dismissed from any part of the regular school day. 5. Transportation is not provided by CISD. 6. Background checks are not provided by CISD. 7. Students are responsible for all fees associated with the activity. 8. Off campus physical education requires a year-long commitment. Club Sports: Junior High and High School: Applications will be available to students in Monday, March 19, 2018. Completed applications are due no later than Monday, May 1, 2018. Students should see their counselor for details regarding club sports. Applications for club sports are not available online. 1. Club sports are approved by the campus principal. 2. Club sports must have a campus faculty sponsor or coach. 3. Club sport participants must comply with participation requirements as outlined by the UIL and No Pass-No Play guidelines. 4. Students attending a campus without a specific club sport may participate with an approved alternate campus. 5. Students participating in club sports may not be dismissed from any part of the regular school day. 6. Transportation is not provided by CISD. 7. Students earn .5 physical education credits for the school year. Summer School 2019 Summer school courses are generally offered for remediation. However, some first-time credit opportunities are available. These courses are subject to student interest and availability. Grades in all summer courses will apply to grade point average and eligibility for extracurricular activities. (Summer school grades will not be averaged with a first semester grade.) High school courses taken by entering ninth graders who have successfully completed eighth grade will count towards the student s GPA. Students should consult the National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA) as to whether these courses count for core Grade Point Average. Students are charged a fee for summer school courses. Registration opens in April 2017. High School Acceleration/Initial Credit courses Location: TBD Dates: TBD Art I Communications Applications* Earth Space Science Economics English IV B ESL Academy I, II, III (Earns credit only) Government Health Math Models Spanish II Spanish III PreAP Team Sports History Dual Credit World Geography *Not a required course for graduation for students entering 9th grade in 2015. High School Credit Recovery courses Location: TBD Dates: TBD Algebra I Algebra II Art I Biology Chemistry Communications Applications English I, II, III, IV Geometry Government Economics Health Math Models Physics Spanish I Spanish II Team Sports 05/09/2018 33 Other Credit Opportunities History World Geography World History Online Accelerated Math Initial Credit for the following courses will be offered in an online blended virtual course. In order to be approved for these courses, students must have a minimum grade average of 80, and are recommended to have scored at final Level II on the previous year s STAAR exam in mathematics: 7th grade Math (for 6th graders going into 7th grade transitioning to PreAlgebra), 8th grade PreAlgebra (for 7th graders going into 8th grade transitioning to Algebra I), Algebra I (for 8th graders going into 9th grade transitioning to Geometry PreAP), and Geometry PreAP (for 8th graders going into 9th grade who have successfully completed Algebra I and have principal approval to take Geometry PreAP during the summer and for 9th graders going into 10th grade transitioning to Algebra II) Registration: TBD Dates: TBD Location: TBD Parent Meetings: TBD TBD Junior High Summer School Location: Irons (Irons, Knox, McCullough, York); Peet; Moorhead; Washington Dates: TBD Courses offered for credit recovery: 7th/8th grade Language Arts 7th/8th grade Math 7th/8th grade Science 7th/8th grade Social Studies Chinese Enrichment (not for credit) STAAR re-testers for Math or Reading will report Location: Irons (Irons, Knox, McCullough, York); Peet; Moorhead; Washington Date: TBD Retest dates: TBD (Math); TBD (Reading)05/09/2018 34 Catalog of Courses: Senior High Science 012 Biology Transcript Code: BIO Credit: 1 Biology is a lab-oriented course involving a survey of living systems and their interrelationships. Topics include scientific method, biochemistry, cell structure and function, DNA structure and function, genetics, growth and development of organisms, taxonomy, kingdoms and ecology. Laboratory skills and safety procedures are stressed. 014 Biology PreAP Transcript Code: BIO Credit: 1 This is an accelerated laboratory/lecture course. Topics include scientific method, biochemistry, cell structure and function, DNA structure and function, genetics, human body systems, taxonomy, kingdoms and ecology. Laboratory skills and safety are stressed. Investigations, both individual and group, are integral components of the Pre AP curriculum and may be performed both inside and/or outside of class. 015 Biology AP Transcript Code: AP-BIO Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry (Pre AP recommended) Credit: 1 The advanced placement biology program provides an opportunity for high school students to pursue college level course work and prepare for an exam that allows for college course credit. AP Biology students will be introduced to advanced topics and current aspects of biology, including these areas: biochemistry, cell structure and function, energy transformations, molecular genetics, heredity, natural selection, an overview of organisms and populations, plant and animal physiology, and ecology. Laboratory work is emphasized. A summer assignment may be required. Students are required to take the AP Biology exam. 021 Chemistry Transcript Code: CHEM Prerequisite: Biology and Algebra I Credit: 1 Chemistry I is a lab-oriented course that introduces the basic concepts of inorganic chemistry. Topics include scientific measurement and calculations, lab skills, atomic structure, chemical formulas, equations and stoichiometry, chemical bonding, states of matter, solutions, acids and bases, and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory skills and safety procedures are stressed. 023 Chemistry PreAP Transcript Code: CHEM Prerequisite: Biology and Algebra I and concurrent enrollment in Geometry or Algebra II (Pre AP recommended) Credit: 1 Pre AP Chemistry is a rigorous introductory course for students on an accelerated math and science track. Topics include scientific measurement and calculations, lab skills, atomic structure, chemical formulas, equations and stoichiometry, chemical bonding, states of matter, solutions, acids and bases, and nuclear chemistry. The topics will be covered with more depth of theory and with higher mathematical expectations than level chemistry. Laboratory skills and safety are stressed. Investigations, both individual and group, are integral components of the Pre AP curriculum and may be performed both inside and/or outside of class. 024 Chemistry AP Transcript Code: AP-CHEM Prerequisite: Chemistry and Algebra II (Algebra II may be concurrent, Pre AP recommended) Credit: 1 The course is equivalent to an introductory college course in chemistry. The topics covered follow Advanced Placement guidelines and include: atomic structure, balancing chemical equations, stoichiometry, acids and bases, equilibrium, kinetics and periodic trends. Laboratory investigations requiring formal laboratory reports will be performed 1-2 times per week. Students may be required to participate in additional class meetings for laboratory sessions outside of regular school hours to better prepare for the exam in May. Students are required to take the AP Chemistry exam. 054 Organic Chemistry Honors Transcript Code: ORGCHEM Prerequisite: Chemistry, Physics (Honors recommended) Credit: 1 Organic chemistry is a laboratory course that includes the topics in the typical one-semester college course: functional group nomenclature; reactions within functional groups; bonding theories; reaction mechanisms; stereochemistry, biomolecules (including DNA), and metabolic pathways. A college-level text will be used. 026 Applied Chemistry Transcript Code: CHEM Enrollment is determined by levels of success in prior math and science classes and prior STAAR scores. Credit: 1 Understanding how chemistry applies to daily life is the major emphasis of this course. The topics include scientific measurement and calculations, chemical formulas and equations, stoichiometry, atomic structure, chemical bonding, states of matter, and solutions. This is a course for students with limited mathematics skills. 028 Physics I AP Transcript Code: APPHYS I Prerequisite: Chemistry, Algebra II (Pre AP recommended) Credit: 1 Physics I AP is equivalent to a first-semester college-level physics course. Major topic areas of study include Newtonian mechanics, work, energy, power, mechanical waves, and sound. Problem-solving will be rigorous. A variety of hands-on laboratory investigations and inquiry activities will be included. 029 Physics II AP Transcript Code: APPHYS 2 Prerequisite: Physics I AP recommended Credit: 1 AP Physics 2 is equivalent to a second-semester college level physics course. It is designed for students who are planning to major in pre-med or a life science. Major topic areas of study include fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, optics, atomic and nuclear physics. Problem solving will be rigorous. A variety of hands-on laboratory investigations and inquiry activities will be included 031 Physics Transcript Code: PHYSICS Prerequisite: Chemistry and Geometry 05/09/2018 35 Credit: 1 Physics is a lab-oriented course that studies motion and energy. A combination of laboratory experiments and theory are used to develop the following topics: velocity, acceleration, forces, momentum, energy, heat, sound, electricity, and light. 032 Physics H Transcript Code: PHYSICS Prerequisite: Chemistry (Pre AP recommended) and Geometry (Pre AP recommended) with concurrent enrollment in Algebra II (Pre AP recommended Credit: 1 Physics students will use higher level thinking skills to solve conceptual and numerical problems in laboratory investigations and mathematical computations. A combination of laboratory experiments and theory are used to develop the following topics: velocity, acceleration, force, momentum, energy, heat, sound, light, electricity, and modern physics. This course is more mathematically rigorous than level physics. 035 Physics C AP: Electricity & Magnetism Transcript Code: APPHYSCE Prerequisite: : Physics (031 or 032). OR Physics AP I (028) and concurrent enrollment on Calculus Credit: 1 This course is a calculus based college level physics course. It is designed for students who are planning to major in a physical science or engineering. The major topic area of study will be electricity and magnetism. Problem solving will be rigorous. A variety of hands-on laboratory investigations and inquiry activities will be included. Students are required to take the AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism exam. 038 Physics C AP: Mechanics Transcript Code: APPHYSCM Prerequisite: Physics (031 or 032). OR Physics AP I (028) and concurrent enrollment on Calculus Credit: 1 This course is a calculus based college level physics course. It is designed for students who are planning to major in a physical science or engineering. The major topic area of study will be mechanics. Problem solving will be rigorous. A variety of hands-on laboratory investigations and inquiry activities will be included. Students are required to take the AP Physics C: Mechanics exam. K534 Principles of Technology Transcript Code: PRINCTECH Prerequisite: Biology and Algebra I Credit: 1 Students will conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Various systems will be described in terms of space, time, energy, and matter. Students will study a variety of topics that include laws of motion, conservation of energy, momentum, electricity, magnetism, thermodynamics, and behavior of waves. 039 Earth and Space Science Transcript Code: ESS Prerequisite: 3 credits of Science Credit: 1 Earth and Space Science combines earth science, ocean science, atmospheric science, and space science in a single course. In one year, students learn the basics and special topics of geology, oceanography, meteorology, and planetary astronomy in a course that builds upon the knowledge they learned in their earlier high school science courses of biology, chemistry, and physics. 040 Environmental Systems Transcript Code: ENVIRSYS Prerequisite: 1 credit of Science Credit: 1 This course is designed to provide an overview of the interrelationships of the natural world. It will also examine environmental problems, both natural and human-made, and alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. 041 Aquatic Science Transcript Code: AQUA SCI Prerequisite: 3 credits of Science Credit: 1 This course introduces students to the study of aquatic environments and organisms. Topics include: water quality, chemical and physical properties of water, fresh and salt water plants and animals. Students will participate in field work and be required to use basic algebra skills within the context of scientific problem solving. 042 Astronomy Transcript Code: ASTRMY Prerequisite: 3 credits of Science Credit: 1 A study of the cosmos is offered in this course. Topics include: planets, comets and asteroids in our solar system, galaxies, life and death of stars, theories on the evolution of the universe, instruction on the dynamics and viewing of constellations in the night sky, space flight, history of the Sun, and the Moon, and possibility of life elsewhere. Mathematics is a minor but necessary component of the course. 044 Environmental Science AP Transcript Code: AP-ENVIR Prerequisite: Chemistry and Geometry Credit: 1 The Advanced Placement course in Environmental Science is designed to be the equivalent of a one-semester, introductory college course in environmental science. Its goal is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies to understand the interrelationships of the natural world; to identify and analyze environmental problems, both natural and human-made; to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems; and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Students are required to take the AP Environmental Science exam. K533 Robotics & Automation Transcript Code: ROBOTIC1 Prerequisite: Concepts of Engineering, Technology, and Electronics Recommended for 11-12 Credit: 1 Students enrolled in this course will demonstrate knowledge and skills necessary for the robotic and automation industry. Through implementation of the design process, students will transfer advanced academic skills to component designs in a project-based environment. Students will build prototypes or use simulation software to test their designs. Additionally, students explore career opportunities, employer expectations, and educational needs in the robotic and automation industry. K535 Scientific Research and Design Transcript Code: SCIRD Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Biology Credit: 1 05/09/2018 36 The purpose of this class is to introduce students to scientific research and to prepare them for their Individual Experimental Research Project (IERP). Students will learn problem identification, methods of library and computer searching, research methodologies, and data analysis and presentation. Students will also develop appropriate skills in computer applications, time management, and technical writing. Verbal and graphic communication opportunities will be provided. The concept of the research team will be explored, and importance of peer review and research ethics will be stressed. K536 Scientific Research and Design II Honors Transcript Code: SCIRD2 Credit: 1 The first semester of this course will introduce students to the fundamentals of electronic circuits. Students will build analog and digital direct-current circuits using breadboards. There will also be limited exposure to programmable logic chips. Each student will design and prototype a battery-powered device. During the spring, the students will apply the principles learned in the fall to the design and construction of robots. They will explore the ways robots interact with their surroundings by testing a variety of sensors and interfacing them with programmable logic chips. Some simple programming experience is desirable. K527 Biotechnology I Transcript Code: BIOTECH1 Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry Credit: 1 Students will apply advanced academic knowledge and skills to the emerging fields of biotechnology such as agricultural, medical, regulatory, and forensics. Students will have the opportunity to use sophisticated laboratory equipment, perform statistical analysis, and practice quality-control techniques. K355 Anatomy and Physiology Honors Transcript Code: ANATPHYS Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry Credit: 1 The Anatomy and Physiology course is designed for students to conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students in Anatomy and Physiology will study a variety of topics, including the structure and function of the human body and the interaction of body systems for maintaining homeostasis K3691U Anatomy & Physiology Dual Credit Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, and Lone College Montgomery readiness requirements. Transcript Code: ANATPHYS Credit: 1 This course combines Anatomy and Physiology with Lone Star College Montgomery course 2401. The course is a study of the structure and function of the human body. While all body systems will be covered, emphasis will be given to the study of cells and tissues and physiological interrelationships of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Students conduct laboratory investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. K356H Medical Microbiology Honors Transcript Code: MICRO Prerequisite: Anatomy & Physiology or concurrent enrollment Credit: 1 The Medical Microbiology course is designed to explore the microbial world, studying topics such as pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms, laboratory procedures, identifying microorganisms, drug resistant organisms, and emerging diseases. K357 Pathophysiology Honors Transcript Code: PATHO Prerequisite: Anatomy and Physiology or concurrent enrollment Credit: .5 - 1 The Pathophysiology course is designed for students to conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students in Pathophysiology will study disease processes and how humans are affected. Emphasis is placed on prevention and treatment of disease. Students will differentiate between normal and abnormal physiology. K385 Food Science Transcript Code: FOODSCI Prerequisite: Biology, Chemistry, and one additional science course Credit: 1 Food Science is the study of the nature of foods, the causes of deterioration, the principles underlying food processing, and the improvement of foods for the consuming public. Some of the topics to be covered include the principles of microbiology and food safety practices, the role of fermentation in foods, the reaction of leavening agents in baked products, the role of food additives, and the food preservation process. In Food Science students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. K453 Forensic Science Transcript Code: FRENSCI Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry. Recommended prerequisite: Law Enforcement I Credit: 1 Forensic Science uses a structured and scientific approach to the investigation of crimes such as assault, abuse and neglect, domestic violence, accidental death, and homicide. Students will learn terminology and investigative procedures related to crime scenes, questioning and interviewing, and scientific procedures used to solve criminal acts. Using scientific methods, students will collect and analyze evidence through case studies and simulated crime scenes. Students will conduct fingerprint, ballistics, and blood spatter analysis. Students will gain knowledge and understanding of forensic science by studying the history, legal aspects, and career opportunities in the field of forensics. 060 Lab Management Transcript Code: LAB MGMT LC Credit: Local credit Students help prepare, distribute and clean up lab set-ups for science. Students will prepare solutions, perform standardization titrations, and help maintain stockroom organization. Good organizational skills are necessary. Does not count as a science credit. 061 Internship Transcript Code: INTERSHP LC Credit: Local credit Internship Program places students into a variety of scientific, technical, medical, and other professional setting in the CISD community for four weeks in June. Each student is evaluated by his/her mentor during the internship and is visited by a CISD internship sponsor. 05/09/2018 37 Students accepted into this program are offered the option of earning one-half unit of local credit. To earn one-half unit of local credit for internship, the student must complete a presentation to peers and to the campus internship co-coordinator. 064 Research and Problems I Transcript Code: RES PR I LC 065 Research and Problems II Transcript Code: RES PR 2 LC 066 Research and Problems III Transcript Code: RES PR 3 LC Credit: Local credit 067 Explorations in Science and Technology Transcript Code: EXPLORAT LC Credit: Local credit Social Studies 099 AP Seminar Transcript Code: APSMNR Credit: 1 Grades: 11 AP Seminar is a foundation course that engages students in cross curricular conversation that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Taking this course and AP Research enables students to earn an AP Seminar and Research Certificate. If students take 4 additional AP courses and earns 3 or higher on corresponding exams students can earn a AP Capstone Diploma. 104 AP Research Transcript Code: APRES Prerequisite: AP Seminar Credit: 1 Grades: 12 In the AP Research course, students further their skills acquired in the AP seminar course by understanding research methodology; employing ethical research practices; and accessing, analyzing, and synthesizing information as they address a research question. Taking this course and AP Seminar enables students to earn an AP Seminar and Research Certificate. If students take 4 additional AP courses and earns 3 or higher on corresponding exams students can earn a AP Capstone Diploma. 100 World Geography Transcript Code: W GEO Credit: 1 In World Geography studies, students examine people, places, and environments at local, regional, national, and international scales from the spatial and ecological perspectives of geography. 102 World Geography PREAP Transcript Code: W GEO Credit: 1 In World Geography studies, students examine people, places, and environments at local, regional, national, and international scales from the spatial and ecological perspectives of geography. 103 Human Geography AP Transcript Code: APHUMGEOW (Pre-AP experience recommended) Credit: 1 This class is equivalent to an introductory one semester college course. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use and alteration of Earth s surface. Students are required to take the AP Human Geography exam. 114H Personal Financial Literacy Transcript Code: PFL Credit: .5 Personal Financial Literacy focuses on developing citizens who have the knowledge and skills to make sound, informed financial decisions that will allow them to lead financially secure lifestyles and understand personal financial responsibility. The course strands include earning and spending, saving, and investing, credit and borrowing, insuring and protecting, college and post-secondary education and training. 105 World History Transcript Code: W HIST Prerequisite: World Geography or AP Human Geography Credit: 1 World History Studies is the only course offering students an overview of the entire history of humankind. The major emphasis is on the study of significant people, events and issues from earliest times to the present. 106 World History Honors Prerequisite: World Geography or AP Human Geography Credit: 1 The skills and strategies developed in this course are to prepare students for Advanced Placement courses. 108 World History AP Transcript Code: APWHIST Prerequisite: World Geography or AP Human Geography (PreAP Recommended) Credit: 1 This course is equivalent to an introductory college course in World History. The purpose of this course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. Students are required to take the AP World History exam. 110 US History Transcript Code: US HIST Prerequisite: World History Credit: 1 Students study the history of the United States since Reconstruction to the present. Historical content focuses on the political, economic, and social events and issues related to industrialization and urbanization, major wars, domestic and foreign policies of the Cold War, and post-Cold War eras, and reform movements including civil rights. 111 US History Honors Transcript Code: US HIST Prerequisite: World History Credit: 1 This United States course is a survey covering the period of post-Reconstruction (1877) to the present time. Students study political, economic, social, intellectual, religious and geographic influences on the development of American history. Emphasis is placed on the developing American government and historical world diplomacy. Honors students at this level are expected to have a strong work ethic, as well as strong writing and researching skills. The course covers a smaller time frame (1877 to present) than AP but does a much more in-depth, analytical coverage into the motivations behind various historical events. Thorough use and understanding of critical thinking skills like evaluation, summary, analysis are used to evaluate primary sources. 112 US History AP Transcript Code: APUSHIST Prerequisite: World History (Honors or AP recommended) Credit: 1 This course is equivalent to an introductory college course in US History. This course is designed to 05/09/2018 38 provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in United States History. Students are required to take the AP US History exam. 1131U US History Dual Credit (1301 and 1302) Transcript Code: US HIST Prerequisite: World History and Lone Star College-Montgomery readiness requirements Credit: 1 This class is the introductory college course that focuses on Pre-Columbian American Indians to the present. 115H US Government Transcript Code: GOVT Prerequisite: US History Credit: .5 In Government, the focus is on the principles and beliefs upon which the United States was founded and on the structure, functions, and powers of government at the national, state, and local levels. 116H US Government Honors Transcript Code: GOVT Prerequisite: US History Credit: .5 Students examine current issues and affairs, the political events of both past and present, and an in-depth coverage of the Constitution and law, as well as an evaluation of the checks and balances maintaining American democracy. This course is fast-paced and students must be self-motivated and enjoy being challenged academically. In addition to the general course requirements for U. S. Government, this course requires highly developed reading and writing skills. Students should have a serious commitment to developing competency in analytical skills, essay writing, and evaluative reading on a college level. 117H US Government AP Transcript Code: APUSGOVT Prerequisite: US History (AP, Honors, or dual credit recommended) Credit: .5 This class is equivalent to a one semester introductory college course in US Government and Politics and includes both general concepts and analysis of specific events, theories, and data. Students are required to take the AP Government exam. 118UH Government Dual Credit (2305) Transcript Code: GOVT Prerequisite: US History (AP or Honors Recommended) and Lone Star College Montgomery readiness requirements. Credit: .5 This class in an introductory college course (GOVT 2305 American Government I) that focuses on US Government and Politics and includes both general concepts and analysis of specific events, theories, and data. 120H Economics Transcript Code: ECO-FE Prerequisite: US History Credit: .5 The focus is on the basic principles concerning production, consumption, and distribution of goods and services in the United States and a comparison with those in other countries around the world. 121H Economics Honors Transcript Code: ECO-FE Prerequisite: US History Credit: .5 In addition to the general requirements of the economics course, students should be comfortable reading and interpreting a college-level textbook. This course delves into the intricate nature of fiscal policy in American government and in the today s economy. Students should have a serious commitment to developing competency in analytical skills, essay writing, and evaluative reading on a college level. They must be self-motivated and enjoy being challenged academically in a fast-paced course. 122H Macroeconomics AP Transcript Code: APMACECO Prerequisite: US History (AP, Honors, or dual credit recommended) Credit: .5 This course is equivalent to an introductory one semester college course in Economics. The purpose of this course is to give students an understanding the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. Emphasis is placed on the study of national income and price level determination, and also develops student s familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. Students are required to take the AP Economics (Macro) exam. 129 European History AP Transcript Code: APEHIST Prerequisite: World Geography or concurrent (AP or Honors Recommended) Credit: 1 This class is equivalent to an introductory college course. The study of European History since 1450 introduces students to cultural, economic, political, and social developments that played a fundamental role in shaping the world in which they live. Students are required to take the AP European History exam. 134H Psychology Transcript Code: PSYC Credit: .5 In Psychology students consider the development of the individual and the personality. The study of psychology is based on an historical framework and relies on effective collection and analysis of data. Students study topics such as theories of human development, personality, motivation, and learning. 135H Psychology AP Transcript Code: APPSYC Prerequisite: PREAP or AP experience recommended Credit: .5 This class is equivalent to an introductory college course in Psychology. Students are encouraged to take the AP Psychology exam. 136H Sociology Transcript Code: SOC Credit: .5 In Sociology students study dynamics and models of individual and group relationships. Students study topics such as the history and systems of sociology, cultural and social norms, social institutions, and mass communication. 145H Bible Literacy and Western Civilization Transcript Code: HSNTSS Credit: .5 This course includes the content and history of the Hebrew Scriptures and New Testament. The curriculum will also familiarize students with the influence of the Bible on law, history, literature, and the culture of western civilization. This course maintains religious neutrality and accommodates the diverse religious views, traditions, and perspectives of students. This course does not endorse, favor, or 05/09/2018 39 promote, or disfavor or show hostility toward, any particular religion or nonreligious faith or religious perspective. 151H Special Topics in SS IV Holocaust Study; (Forth time taken) Transcript Code: SPTSS4 Credit: .5 This course uses unique methodology to leads students through an examination of the history of the Holocaust, while fostering their skills in ethical reasoning, critical thinking, empathy, and civil engagement. By focusing on choices of individuals who experienced this history through primary sources, eyewitness testimonies, personal reflections, poetry, and images students are given a lens to thoughtfully examine the universal themes and questions about human behavior inherent in a student of the Holocaust. Students are also prompted to draw connections between history and the world today. 153 Student Leadership (Student Council)* Transcript Code: STULEAD Credit: 1 (1st year only) This course provides the opportunity for active members of the Student Council to plan, organize and direct activities to enhance student communication, student support, and student leadership within their school community. 154H Teen Leadership I Transcript Code: TEENLDR Credit: .5 This program will help students develop communication, leadership, public speaking, professional and business skills. Students will also develop an understanding of the concept of principle-based decision-making and the need for vision goal-setting. 154B Teen Leadership II Transcript Code: TEENLDR Prerequisite: Teen Leadership I Credit: .5 This course continues the application of skills developed in Teen Leadership I. The class incorporates public speaking, communication, decision-making, fiscal planning, and long-range planning through a variety of activities. 155 Student Council LC Credit: Local credit This course provides the opportunity for active members of the Student Council to plan, organize and direct activities to enhance student communication, student support, and student leadership within their school community. Math 159 Algebra I Honors Transcript Code: ALG 1 Credit: 1 While covering the same basic objectives of the 162 Algebra I course, students in this course will be challenged with assignments requiring higher order thinking skills. 162 Algebra I Transcript Code: ALG 1 Credit: 1 Students will build on the basic foundation of concepts presented in K-8 Mathematics, use symbols to study relationships among quantities, functions to represent and model problem situations, and analyze and interpret relationships. Students will work in many situations to set up equations, use a variety of methods to solve meaningful problems and will continually use problem solving, computation in problem-solving contexts, language and communication, connections within and outside of mathematics, and reasoning, as well as multiple representations, applications and modeling, and justification and proof. 164 Geometry Transcript Code: GEOM Prerequisite: Algebra I Credit: 1 Students will build on the basic foundation of concepts presented in K-8 Mathematics and Algebra I, use geometric thinking to understand mathematical concepts and relationships among them, study properties and relationships having to do with size, shape, location, direction, and orientation of one, two, and three-dimensional figures. Students will perceive the connection between geometry and the real and mathematical worlds and use geometrical ideas, relationships, and properties to solve problems. Students will use a variety of representations (concrete, pictorial, algebraic, and coordinate), tools, and technology to solve meaningful problems by representing figures, transforming figures, analyzing relationships among figures, and proving concepts related to figures. 165 Geometry PreAP Transcript Code: GEOM Prerequisite: Algebra I Credit: 1 While covering the same basic objectives of the 164 Geometry course, students in this course will be challenged with assignments requiring exploration, abstract and higher order thinking skills and be required to synthesize their knowledge of postulates and theorems to organize and construct detailed proofs of more complex mathematical theorems. Successful students are willing to devote time to memorizing basic theorems and postulates. 166 Mathematical Models Transcript Code: MTHMOD Prerequisite: Algebra I Enrollment is determined by levels of success in prior math and science classes and prior STAAR scores. Must be taken before Algebra II. Credit: 1 Students use algebraic, graphical, and geometric reasoning to recognize patterns and structure, to model information, and to solve problems from various disciplines and mathematical methods to model and solve real-life applied problems involving money, data, chance, patterns, music, design, and science. Studentsuse mathematical models from algebra, geometry, probability, and statistics and connections among these to solve problems from a wide variety of advanced applications in both mathematical and nonmathematical situations. 167 Algebra II Transcript Code: ALG 2 Prerequisite: Geometry Credit: 1 Students will build on the foundation presented in Algebra I and Geometry. This includes continued study of linear and quadratic functions, graphing skills, and systems of equations and inequalities. New topics include, but are not limited to, matrices, functions (logarithmic, exponential, polynomial, rational, and piecewise) and conic sections. Students will use multiple representations, technology, and applications for better understanding of these concepts. This course is critical for students who wish to continue in higher mathematics. 05/09/2018 40 168 Algebra II PreAP Transcript Code: ALG 2 Prerequisite: Geometry (Pre-AP recommended) Credit: 1 While covering the same basic objectives of the 167 Algebra II course, students in this course will be challenged with assignments requiring abstract and higher order thinking skills. This course provides a solid foundation for upper-level mathematics courses. Graphing calculators and other graphing utilities will be used extensively as students incorporate technology to discover generalizations of concepts and apply these concepts to realistic situations. Students may learn several methods for solving a problem and will be required to choose the most efficient method to complete the task. 170 Pre-Calculus Transcript Code: PRE CALC Prerequisite: Algebra II Credit: 1 Pre-Calculus is a preparatory course for Calculus. The course expands on the Geometry and Algebra II curriculum. Topics covered include polynomial functions, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, circular functions, trigonometry, inequalities, complex numbers, sequences and series, parametric equations, conic sections, and vectors. There is an emphasis of higher level thinking with a strong emphasis on graphing applications. Graphing calculators and other graphing utilities are used when appropriate. 171 Pre-Calculus PreAP Transcript Code: PRE CALC Prerequisite: Algebra II (PreAP recommended) Credit: 1 Pre-Calculus Pre-AP is a preparatory course for Advanced Placement Calculus. The course expands on the Algebra II PreAP curriculum and introduces trigonometry, polar equations, vectors, and sequences and series. There is an expectation of higher level mathematical thinking skills with an emphasis on applications. 174 Statistics AP Transcript Code: APSTATS Prerequisite: Algebra II (PreAP recommended) Credit: 1 This course prepares students for the Advanced Placement Statistics Exam in May and requires students to collect, interpret, summarize, and compare various distributions of data. The topics for AP Statistics are divided into four major themes: exploratory analysis, planning a study, probability, and statistical inference. Graphing calculators with statistical software such as the TI-83/84 or TI-89 are used extensively. A lab fee may be assessed. Students are required to take the AP Statistics exam. 175 Calculus AB AP Transcript Code: APCALCAB Prerequisite: Precalculus (PreAP recommended) Credit: 1 This course is designed for advanced math students. Limits, derivatives, and the definite integral are studied in detail. This course emphasizes the various types and applications of differentiation and integration. Students are required to take the AP Calculus AB exam. 176 Calculus BC AP Transcript Code: APCALCBC Prerequisite: Precalculus (PreAP recommended) Credit: 1 This course is for highly motivated math oriented students who desire the challenge of a college course. The curriculum includes all AB topics plus methods of integration, calculus of polar functions, parametric functions, and vectors, sequences and series including Taylor and McClaurin functions. Students are required to take the AP Calculus BC exam. 180 Multi-Variable Calculus Transcript Code: MULTCAL Prerequisite: BC Calculus Credit: 1 Multivariable Calculus takes the concepts learned in the single variable calculus course and extends them to multiple dimensions. This would be a third year Calculus course for students who have completed BC Calculus and offers students an opportunity to take math all four years of high school. 183 IS: Research Project in Mathematics I Honors Transcript Code: INSTUMTH 184 IS: Research Project in Mathematics II Honors Transcript Code: INSTMTH2 185 IS: Research Project in Mathematics III Honors Transcript Code: INSTMTH3 Credit: 1 179 Advanced Quantitative Reasoning Transcript Code: ADQUANR Prerequisite: Algebra II Credit: 1 This course is an engaging and rigorous course that prepares students for a range of future options in non-mathematics intensive college majors or for entering workforce training programs. The course emphasizes statistics and financial applications, and it prepares students to use Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, and Discrete Mathematics to model a range of situations and solve problems. 189 IS: College Algebra Transcript Code: INSTUMTH Prerequisite: Algebra II Credit: 1 This course reinforces skills developed in previous math courses as well as new topics leading to trigonometry. The topics include absolute value in equations and inequalities, graphing, inverse functions, logarithmic and exponential functions, polynomial and rational functions, piecewise-defined functions, and the theory of equations and matrices. 190A College Algebra H Transcript Code: INSTUMTH Prerequisite: Algebra II Credit: .5 This course reinforces skills developed in previous math courses as well as new topics leading to trigonometry. The topics include absolute value in equations and inequalities, graphing, inverse functions, logarithmic and exponential functions, polynomial and rational functions, piece-wise-defined functions, the theory of equations and matrices. 190UB College Algebra DC Transcript Code: INSTUMTH Prerequisite: College Algebra H Credit: .5 This course reinforces skills developed in previous math courses as well as new topics leading to trigonometry. The topics include absolute value in equations and inequalities, graphing, inverse functions, logarithmic and exponential functions, polynomial and rational functions, piecewise-defined functions, and the theory of equations and matrices. Students meeting all requirements of Lone Star College-Montgomery prior to or during the semester may apply and register to receive dual credit for this course. Upon 05/09/2018 41 completion of Dual Credit requirements, student will be enrolled in College Algebra DC 1314. 863 Computer Science I AP Transcript Code: APTACSA Prerequisite: Computer Science I PreAP Credit: 1 This course follows the College Board Computer Science Advanced Placement Guidelines. The course will be taught using the programming language Java. The Barron s study guide will be used in preparation for the AP Computer Science A test. This course may be counted as a math credited on the Recommended Plan ONLY. Students are required to take the AP Computer Science exam. 1971 College Prep Math (TSI) Transcript Code: CPMAT Prerequisite: Algebra II Recommended and Committee approved. Credit: 1 This course is intended to prepare students for the study of entry-level college mathematics to enter post-secondary coursework or careers with no additional remediation in mathematics. Topics in the fall include basic algebraic operations, solving linear equations and inequalities, laws of integer exponents, factoring, rational expressions, the Cartesian coordinate system, graphing lines, finding equations of lines and solving linear systems. Spring topics include special products and factoring, rational expressions and equations, rational exponents, radicals, radical equations, quadratic equations, absolute value equations and inequalities, complex numbers; equations of lines, an introduction to the function concept, and graphing. English Summer reading may be required; please check with your campus. 199 AP Seminar Transcript Code: APSMNR Credit: 1 Grades: 11 AP Seminar is a foundation course that engages students in cross curricular conversation that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Taking this course and AP Research enables students to earn an AP Seminar and Research Certificate. If students take 4 additional AP courses and earns 3 or higher on corresponding exams students can earn a AP Capstone Diploma. 205 AP Research Transcript Code: APRES Prerequisite: AP Seminar Credit: 1 Grades: 12 In the AP Research course, students further their skills acquired in the AP seminar course by understanding research methodology; employing ethical research practices; and accessing, analyzing, and synthesizing information as they address a research question. Taking this course and AP Seminar enables students to earn an AP Seminar and Research Certificate. If students take 4 additional AP courses and earns 3 or higher on corresponding exams students can earn a AP Capstone Diploma. 200 English I Transcript Code: ENG 1 Credit: 1 This introductory high school course focuses on activities that build on students prior knowledge and skills in order to strengthen their reading, writing, and oral language skills. Students will read extensively in different cultural, historical and contemporary contexts and demonstrate familiarity with works by authors from non-English speaking literary traditions with emphasis on classical literature. Students will engage in the composing process of multi-paragraph compositions including literary, expository, procedural and persuasive. Emphasis on the ability to demonstrate organizational structure, a controlling idea or thesis and writing for a variety of audiences will be practiced. 202 English I PreAP Transcript Code: ENG 1 Credit: 1 This course offers an in-depth study of world literature from multiple genres. Students read and write extensively as they explore the significance of historical context, as well as literary forms, terms, and techniques. Clarity, logic, and the ability to formulate and defend a thesis statement are key components of writing instruction and practice. Students will complete compositions both outside and inside of class. These will include response to literary-style analysis, expository, literary, procedural and persuasive. The conventions of language, syntax, the ability to write to a variety of audiences, in addition to the mechanics of writing are continuously addressed to facilitate the writing process. 206 English II Transcript Code: ENG 2 Prerequisite: English I Credit: 1 English II further expands and refines the skills learned in English I. The focus on writing emphasizes persuasive forms such as logical arguments and expressions of opinion. In addition, writing for a variety of audiences, rhetorical writing activities in the study of literature, expository and procedural will be addressed. English II students read extensively in multiple genres from world literature originally written in English or translated to English. 208 English II PreAP Transcript Code: ENG 2 Prerequisite: English I Credit: 1 This course focuses on an in-depth analysis of world literature from multiple genres. Students read and write extensively as they interpret influences of the historical context on a literary work and learn literary forms and terms associated with the readings. All modes of writing are practiced with an emphasis on persuasive and analytic forms. With each type of writing, students are expected to plan, draft, revise, and edit their work. The oral and written conventions of writing are continuously reviewed and practiced in order to facilitate the writing process. 212 English III Transcript Code: ENG 3 Prerequisite: English II Credit: 1 English III further expands and refines the concepts and skills learned in both English II and English I. In addition, students will write longer compositions incorporating outside documentation, making rhetorical choices on audience, purpose and form, and writing a variety of persuasive, informative and analytical pieces. Students will read extensively from American literature with emphasis on the knowledge, history and major features of this discourse. The course will further provide extensive practice through both reading and writing in the development of critical thinking. 05/09/2018 42 213 English III Honors Transcript Code: ENG 3 Prerequisite: English II Credit: 1 This in-depth study of American literature will provide students with an opportunity to recognize and evaluate major periods, authors, themes, works, and forms of American literature. Analytical reading and writing, research, and English grammar and usage will be addressed. This honors course exceeds the traditional requirements through content, process, and product. 214 English Language III AP Transcript Code: APENGLAN Prerequisite: English II (Pre-AP recommended) Credit: 1 This course prepares students for the AP Language and Composition exam. It trains students to become skilled readers and writers in diverse genres and modes of composition. This focus ultimately enables students to independently read and understand complex texts and write rich, effective prose in response to those texts. As the course progresses, students become aware of their own composition process through self-assessment and evaluations by both peers and the instructor. These skills will allow the student to read critically and write effectively in different modes in the college classroom and beyond. Students are required to take the AP English Language exam. 2161U English III Dual Credit (1301 and 1302) Transcript Code: ENG 3 Prerequisite: English II and Lone Star College-Montgomery readiness requirements Credit: 1 This course combines American literature with Lone Star College-Montgomery courses 1301 and 1302, language composition skills and outcomes. The course will help students become skilled readers of prose in a variety of disciplines. There is intensive study and practice in writing processes, from invention and researching to drafting, revising and editing, both individually and collaboratively. An emphasis is placed on effective rhetorical choices, including audience, purpose, arrangement, and style. Focus on writing the academic essay as a vehicle for learning, communicating, and critical analysis is stressed. The course continues to help students with the study of and practice in the strategies and techniques for developing research-based expository and persuasive texts. An emphasis on effective and ethical rhetorical inquiry, including primary and secondary research methods; critical reading of verbal, visual, and multimedia texts; systematic evaluation, synthesis, and documentation of information sources; and critical thinking about evidence and conclusions will be included. 2171U English IV Dual Credit (2332 and 2333) Transcript Code: ENG 4 Prerequisite: English III DC (1301 or 1302) and Lone Star College-Montgomery readiness requirements Credit: 1 This course teaches students to trace, interpret, and evaluate the cultural and literary development of World Literature (English 2332 and 2333(, both in form and content, from the Classical Age to the present time. Students will read, interpret and evaluate literary works with attention to the theme, situation, tone, structure, and style of the literature and write logical, well-organized, well-supported critical responses to literary works, using appropriate documentation, as required. They will understand the distinguishing characteristics of various genres of literature and recognize the aesthetic, moral, and intellectual values as well as recognizing major themes in literature. The student must earn a 70 overall semester average to earn each 3 hours of college credit. 218 English IV Transcript Code: ENG 4 Prerequisite: English III Credit: 1 In English IV the course further expands the concepts and skills learned in earlier English classes. The focus of study will be on commonly recognized patterns of organization, precision in meaning through language and rhetorical choices, analysis of ideas, and use of sophisticated and precise word choices. Students will read and recognize major authors, periods, forms and works in British literature. Focus will be on recurring themes, devices of propaganda, analysis of the presentation of ideas including forms of logical reasoning and techniques of persuasive language. Students will understand the application of abstract concepts and read and think critically. 211 English IV College Prep: Integrated Reading and Writing II (TSI) Transcript Code: CPELA Prerequisite: English III, TSI score, and committee approval Credit: 1 Students will learn to investigate academic texts, construct supported interpretations and arguments for an authentic audience, and acquire academic habits of thought. Reading instruction will focus on developing critical reading skills for comprehension, interpretation, and analysis. In writing, students will develop skills through composing with specific purpose, situation, genre, and audience in mind. Students will write a variety of effective formal and informal texts. To learn to integrate reading and writing, students will use an inquiry approach to analyze, synthesize, and make value judgments regarding text and writing. This course is designed to prepare students for college-level reading and writing intensive courses. 219 English IV Honors Transcript Code: ENG 4 Prerequisite: English III Credit: 1 This in-depth study of British literature presents a chronological survey from Beowulf to modern times. Emphasis is placed on improving composition skills, using various forms of discourse and patterns of organization, and reviewing grammar and language usage. Students will be able to read with a critical focus by penetrating deeper into both the content of literature and the analysis of that content. Critical findings will be organized around a central idea in composition. Extensive vocabulary enrichment will enhance mastery of the English language. Students are encouraged to purchase the MLA handbook as it will be used extensively. 220 English Literature IV AP Transcript Code: APENGLIT Prerequisite: English III (Pre-AP recommended) Credit: 1 This course emphasizes both effective and critical reading in preparation for the Advanced Placement Literature exam. The stylistic excellence that the students come to appreciate through attentive analysis of a variety of prose texts can serve them in their own writing. Concepts of grammar and language usage will be reviewed and extended. A study of literary genres 05/09/2018 43 trains students to analyze the fictional, poetic, and dramatic elements of literary texts and to read to appreciate the writer s craft. The course emphasizes effective critical reading as well as college-level writing skills in preparation for the Advanced Placement literature exam and for success in college writing. Students are required to take the AP English Literature exam. 2211U English IV Dual Credit (1301 and 1302) Transcript Code: ENG 4 Prerequisite: English III and Lone Star College-Montgomery readiness requirements Credit: 1 This course combines British and world literature with Lone Star College 1301 and 1302 Composition and Rhetoric I and II. The course emphasizes both effective and critical reading and writing. Through intensive analysis of a variety of literary genres and styles, the students acquire greater appreciation of excellent writing, while also improving their own writing ability. The student must meet all Montgomery College requirements prior to the course beginning. 224 English I SOL Transcript Code: ENG1 SOL 225 English II SOL Transcript Code: ENG2 SOL Credit: 1 This course is available to those students who have been identified as Limited English Proficient. The curriculum emphasizes the development of listening, speaking, reading, writing and culture. Only two credits of ESOL may count as English credits for graduation. 226 Contemporary Media Transcript Code: CONTMED Prerequisite: English II or concurrent enrollment Credit: 1 Students explore the role of media as it influences tastes, behavior, purchasing, and voting decisions. The historical development of media and its related technologies and personalities will be examined. Students will plan, produce, present, and evaluate media messages. Students will explore relationships among various forms of mass communication and evaluate the roles of television, film, radio, social media, internet, periodicals, music, etc. as historical and cultural timelines. 228 Creative Writing Transcript Code: CREAT WR Prerequisite: English II Credit: .5 1 The study of creative and imaginative writing allows high school students to earn one-half to one credit while developing versatile skills in essay, poetic, dramatic, and short story forms of writing. All students are expected to demonstrate the recursive nature of the writing process, applying the conventions of usage and mechanics of written English, and analyzing and discussing both published and unpublished writers' pieces and methods, in order to set personal goals for writing. 229 Humanities Transcript Code: HUMANIT Prerequisite: English II Credit: .5-1 Humanities is an interdisciplinary course that includes the study of major historical and cultural movements and their relationship to literature, fine arts, and the social sciences. This is a rigorous course of study in which students show an in-depth understanding of creative achievements in the arts and literature and how these various art forms reflect history. Participation and assessment include class discussions, oral presentations, creative projects, journals, readings, and written responses. 230 Bible Literacy and Western Civilization Transcript Code: HSNTENG Credit: .5 - 1 This course includes the content and history of the Hebrew Scriptures and New Testament. The curriculum will also familiarize students with the influence of the Bible on law, history, literature, and the culture of western civilization. This course maintains religious neutrality and accommodates the diverse religious views, traditions, and perspectives of students. This course does not endorse, favor, or promote, or disfavor or show hostility toward, any particular religion or nonreligious faith or religious perspective. 232 Practical Writing Transcript Code: PRACT WR Credit: .5 -1 This study of writing allows high school students to earn one-half to one credit while developing skills necessary for writing to a specific purpose, such as business writing or writing to a prompt. This course emphasizes skill in the use of the conventions of grammar and usage of written English, the effective use of vocabulary, and a basic understanding of the recursive nature of the writing process. 236H College Readiness and Study Skills Transcript Code: CRSS Credit: .5 This course focuses on skills necessary to enhance performance on the PSAT, SAT or ACT test. 237 Reading I Transcript Code: READ1 238 Reading II Transcript Code: READ2 239 Reading III Transcript Code: READ3 Credit: 1 Reading I, II, and III offers students instruction in word recognition and comprehension strategies and vocabulary. Students are given opportunities to locate information in varied sources, to read critically, to evaluate sources, and to draw supportable conclusions. Students learn how various texts are organized and how authors choose language for effect. 275 Research and Technical Writing Transcript Code: TECHWR Credit: 1 This rigorous composition course provides students with an in-depth study of writing in the academic disciplines through their own practice and by providing tutoring at the high school Writing Center. All students are expected to demonstrate an understanding of the writing process, and to effectively apply the conventions of usage and the mechanics of written English. The student s evaluation of their own writing as well as the writing of others ensures that students completing this course are able to analyze and discuss published and unpublished pieces of writing, develop, and apply criteria for effective writing, and set their own goals as writers. 279 Independent Study in English - Year I Transcript Code: INDENG Prerequisite: English II and Interview Process Credit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Course would serve as 1st year course for Writing Tutors. This rigorous 05/09/2018 44 composition course provides students with an in-depth study of writing in the academic disciplines through their own practice and by providing tutoring at the high school Writing Center. All students are expected to demonstrate an understanding of the writing process, and to effectively apply the conventions of usage and the mechanics of written English. The student s evaluation of their own writing, as well as the writing of others ensures that students completing the course are able to analyze and discuss published and unpublished pieces of writing, develop, and apply criteria for effective writing, and set their own goals as writers. 280 Independent Study in English - Year II Transcript Code: INDENG2 Prerequisite: Independent Study in English I Credit: 1 Grades: 11-12 Course would serve as 2nd year course for Writing Tutors. This rigorous composition courses builds on the principles of in-depth study of writing in the academic disciplines through the practice of providing tutoring at the high school writing center. All students are expected to demonstrate an understanding of the writing process, and to effectively apply the conventions of usage and the mechanics of written English to their own writing and the writing of their peers . Year Two tutors will further their understanding of self-reflection and evaluation by completing a writing portfolio that includes an in-depth research paper of writing in a chosen profession, and at least two analytical pieces of writing across disciplines. In addition, a Year Two writing tutor will take on mentoring responsibilities of the Year One tutors, leadership roles in the administration and efficient running of the center, and actively participate in recruiting future tutors. 292 Dyslexic Reading I Transcript Code: READ1 293 Dyslexic Reading II Transcript Code: READ2 294 Dyslexic Reading III Transcript Code: READ3 Credit: 1 This course is designed to students who have been diagnosed as Dyslexic. It is an individualized program based on student needs. The major instructional strategy will utilize individualized, intensive, multi-sensory methods. Journalism 241 Journalism Transcript Code: JRNLSM Credit: 1 This course is a survey of print and broadcast communications, from newspapers, magazines and yearbooks to broadcast programs. It is a writing intensive course covering all aspects of print media production. Students should be well-grounded in grammar and punctuation. 242 Journalism: Yearbook Transcript Code: JRNLSM Credit: 1 254 Advanced Journalism Yearbook I Transcript Code: YBK1 Prerequisite: Journalism Credit: 1 255 Advanced Journalism Yearbook II Transcript Code: YBK2 Credit: 1 256 Advanced Journalism Yearbook III Transcript Code: YBK3 Credit: 1 These courses involve the production of the high school yearbook. Some of the elements covered by the members of the staff will be production of effective graphic art, writing and editing copy, implementing a circulation campaign, selling advertisements to the community, shooting and editing photographs to fit an overall page and cooperating with persons and organizations in developing a product. 257 IS: Journalism Yearbook Transcript Code: IND JOUR Prerequisite: Advanced Journalism Yearbook III Credit: 1 These courses involve the production of the high school yearbook. Some of the elements covered by the members of the staff will be production of effective graphic art, writing and editing copy, implementing a circulation campaign, selling advertisement to the community, shooting and editing photographs to fit an overall page and cooperating with persons and organizations in developing a product. 243 Advanced Broadcast Journalism I Transcript Code: BRCTJOR1 Prerequisite: Journalism Credit: 1 Students will learn the skills of interviewing and the process of creating a news broadcast. Students will learn laws and ethical considerations that affect broadcast journalism and analyze the significance of visual representations. Instruction includes: on screen talent, scriptwriting, operation of digital cameras and digital imaging, digital graphics, mastery of audio techniques, lighting, production, monitoring equipment and set design, producing the Video Yearbook. 244 Advanced Broadcast Journalism II Transcript Code: BRCTJOR2 Prerequisite: Advanced Broadcast Journalism I Credit: 1 245 Advanced Broadcast Journalism III Transcript Code: BRCTJOR3 Credit: 1 Students will enhance their interview and digital editing skills in the process of creating a news broadcast. Instruction includes: continued focus on ethics in journalism, digital imaging software, television production and scriptwriting, producing the Video Yearbook. 246 Advanced Journalism Literary Magazine I Transcript Code: LM1 Prerequisite: Journalism Credit: 1 247 Advanced Journalism Literary Magazine II Transcript Code: LM2 Credit: 1 This course allows students to further develop magazine production skill and participate in publishing the High School Literary Magazine. 250 Advanced Journalism Newspaper I Transcript Code: NP1 Prerequisite: Journalism Credit: 1 251 Advanced Journalism Newspaper II Transcript Code: NP2 Credit: 1 252 Advanced Journalism Newspaper III Transcript Code: NP3 Credit: 1 These classes produce the high school newspaper. Elements covered include interviewing, writing, editing, selling 05/09/2018 45 advertisements and creating a visually pleasing graphic design. 253 IS: Journalism Newspaper Transcript Code: IND JOUR Prerequisite: Advanced Journalism Newspaper III Credit: 1 These classes produce the high school newspaper. Elements covered include interviewing, writing, editing, selling advertisements and creating a visually pleasing graphic design. 258 Photojournalism Transcript Code: PHOTJOUR Prerequisite: English I Credit: 1 This course is an extensive guide to concepts of photography with emphasis on equipment, techniques, film, lighting, composition and photojournalism. Students must have either a 35 mm SLR with manual capabilities or a digital camera with a minimum of 5 megapixels and manual capabilities. 259H IS: Journalism Photojournalism Transcript Code: INDJOUR Prerequisite: Photojournalism Credit: .5 This course is an extensive guide to concepts of photography with emphasis on equipment, techniques, film, lighting, composition, and photojournalism. Students must have either a 35 mm SLR with manual capabilities or a digital camera with a minimum of 5 megapixels and manual capabilities. Speech and Debate 260H Communication Applications Transcript Code: COMMAPP Credit: .5 Students will learn communication theory and have the opportunity to develop practical skills for both professional and social communication. 261 Debate I Transcript Code: DEBATE 1 Credit: 1 Specific formats of debate will be studied with emphasis on Lincoln Douglas, Policy Debate and Public Forum Debate. Students will research and write affirmative and negative cases, briefs and blocks for various debate resolutions. Students will learn cross-examination, refutation and rebuttal techniques. 262 Debate II Transcript Code: DEBATE 2 Prerequisite: Debate I Credit: 1 This course will provide the student with advanced study of essential elements studied in Debate I as well as the opportunity to participate in debate tournaments. Students are required to compete in a minimum of two debate tournaments. 263 Debate III Transcript Code: DEBATE 3 Prerequisite: Debate II Credit: 1 This course will provide the student with advanced study of essential elements studied in Debate I and II as well as being required to compete in a majority of debate tournaments. 264 IS: Debate Transcript Code: IND SPCH Prerequisite: Debate III Credit: 1 The emphasis of this course is placed on research techniques used in securing information for the current debate topic. Course activities include various debate formats, writing briefs, resolution interpretation, affirmative and negative case construction, argument evaluation and presentation of debate. Participation in debate tournaments is required. Languages other than English (LOTE) 300 Spanish I Transcript Code: SPAN 1 Credit: 1 This course offers basic understanding of the Spanish language and exposure to the culture of the Spanish-speaking world. Introduction to basic vocabulary and grammar will enable students to learn to discuss everyday topics such as family, school, numbers, time and weather. Oral and written practices are stressed. 301 Spanish II Transcript Code: SPAN 2 Prerequisite: Spanish I Credit: 1 This course continues the study of language skills important for everyday use. The basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and understanding the culture are continued. This course emphasizes grammatical concepts. 301G Spanish IIG Transcript Code: SPAN2 Prerequisite: Spanish I Credit: 1 This course is designed for students who plan to advance to higher level Spanish courses. The rigor is designed for students going on to take Spanish III and higher. This course continues the study of language skills important for everyday use. The basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and understanding the culture are continued. This course emphasizes grammatical concepts. 311 Spanish II NS Transcript Code: SSSPAN2 Prerequisite: Spanish I NS (316) Credit: 1 This course is designed for students whose home language is Spanish. Students will be given the opportunity to expand their ability to comprehend, speak, read, and write Spanish in accordance with their linguistic and cultural strengths. 302 Spanish III Transcript Code: SPAN 3 Prerequisite: Spanish II Credit: 1 This course is a continuation of the basic language skills of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and understanding the culture. 303 Spanish III PreAP Transcript Code: SPAN 3 Prerequisite: Spanish IIG Recommended Credit: 1 This course is designed for students who plan to advance to higher level Spanish courses. Emphasis is on oral and written communication through continued study of conversation, writing, reading, acquisition of vocabulary, and advanced grammar concepts. Students are also taught to develop higher level thinking skills in Spanish such as synthesis, analysis, and evaluation. Spanish is spoken in the classroom most of the time. 305 Spanish IV AP Language Transcript Code: APSPALAN Prerequisite: Spanish III PAP Recommended Credit: 1 This course is designed to develop advanced level language skills in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, 05/09/2018 46 writing, and grammatical structures in order to prepare students to take the AP Spanish Language test. Spanish is spoken in the classroom almost exclusively. Students are required to take the AP Spanish Language exam. 306 Spanish V AP Literature Transcript Code: SPSPALIT Prerequisite: Spanish III PreAP (303) or Spanish AP Credit: 1 This course is designed to develop more advanced level language skills, concentrating on the areas of reading and composition in order to prepare students to take the AP Spanish Literature test. Spanish is spoken in the classroom almost exclusively. Students are required to take the AP Spanish Literature exam. 3091U Spanish IV Dual Credit Transcript Code: SPAN4 Prerequisite: Spanish III PreAP (303), Lone Star Montgomery s readiness requirements and their Avant Placement test Credit: 1 This course stresses both oral and written exercises to increase vocabulary expansion of grammatical principles and short themes written on a variety of topics. Selected readings are included to improve comprehension in Spanish. As the course progresses, there will be continued emphasis on works by Spanish speaking authors and reinforcement of both grammatical principles and writing skills. Spanish is spoken in the classroom almost exclusively. 320 French I Transcript Code: FREN 1 Credit: 1 This course offers a basic understanding of the French language and the culture and geography of the French-speaking world. Introduction to basic vocabulary and grammar will enable students to learn to discuss simple everyday topics such as family, school, numbers, time, sports, clothing. food, and travel. Oral and written practices are stressed. 321 French II Transcript Code: FREN 2 Prerequisite: French I Credit: 1 This course continues the study of language skills, which are important for everyday life. The basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and understanding the culture are continued. 323 French III PreAP Transcript Code: FREN 3 Prerequisite: French II Credit: 1 This course emphasizes oral and written communication through continued study of conversation, writing, reading, grammar, and vocabulary study. Additional emphasis is placed on the culture and civilization of French speaking people through an introduction to modern and classic French literature. French is used in the classroom as much as possible. 325 French IV AP Language Transcript Code: APFR LAN Prerequisite: French III PreAP (323) Credit: 1 The study of French literature, philosophy, culture, and language continues with an emphasis on oral and written communication. Students concentrate on the areas of reading and composition to prepare for the AP French Literature examination. French is spoken in the classroom most of the time. Students are required to take the AP French Language exam. 340 German I Transcript Code: GERMAN 1 Credit: 1 This course offers a basic understanding of the German language and the culture and geography of the German-speaking world. Students learn the vocabulary for simple everyday topics such as family, school, numbers, time, sports and clothing. Oral and written practices are stressed. Present and past tense verbs, as well as elementary grammar will be presented. 341 German II Transcript Code: GERMAN 2 Prerequisite: German I Credit: 1 This course continues the study of language skills, which are important for everyday life. The basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and understanding the culture are continued. 343 German III PreAP Transcript Code: GERMAN 3 Prerequisite: German II Credit: 1 This course emphasizes oral and written communication through continued study of conversation, writing, reading, grammar and vocabulary study. German is used in the classroom as much as possible. 345 German IV AP LANGUAGE Transcript Code: APGR LAN Prerequisite: German III PreAP Credit: 1 This is a continuation of German literature and language. Students prepare to take the Advanced Placement German Language Exam combining all of their skills in areas of listening, reading, writing and speaking in a variety of applications. Students will complete independent reading assignments, write essays and maintain sustained speech in German. This class is conducted in German. Students are required to take the AP German Language exam. 370 Japanese I Transcript Code: JAPN 1 Credit: 1 This course offers a basic understanding of the Japanese language and culture. Introduction to basic vocabulary and grammar will enable students to function in simple everyday topics; such as self, school/family life, weather, time, numbers, and locations. Oral practice is stressed. Students will practice reading and writing HIRAGANA AND KATAKANA and will learn 20-30 KANJI. Students will write basic sentences using them. They will begin reading basic materials. 371 Japanese II Transcript Code: JAPN 2 Prerequisite: Japanese I Credit: 1 Continued study in this course will enable students to function in Japanese situations which are important in everyday life. Students will continue to practice reading and writing HIRAGANA and KATAKANA and will learn about 100 KANJI in this course. Oral activities will be stressed and cultural activities will be the important part of the class. They will continue to read basic materials. 372 Japanese III PreAP Transcript Code: JAPN 3 Prerequisite: Japanese II Credit: 1 Students will learn colloquial expressions and plain verb endings related to everyday topics so that they will be able to communicate smoothly in more informal situations. They will learn about 200 basic KANJI. They will engage in oral and listening comprehension exercises. They will also 05/09/2018 47 continue to practice reading and writing. Cultural activities will continue. 377 Japanese IV AP Transcript Code: APJAP LAN Prerequisite: Japanese III PreAP Credit: 1 Students will read, discuss, and write reports on various topics of everyday life and contemporary Japanese culture. They will learn 150-200 additional KANJI during the course. Students will deal with complex grammar and sentence structured involving passive, causative, causative-passive, and honorific. The class is taught in Japanese. Students are required to take the AP Japanese Language exam. 385 Chinese I Transcript Code: CHIN 1 Credit: 1 This course is designed to help students develop basic Chinese language skills in speaking, reading and writing of modern Chinese by combining traditional textbook materials with hands on explorations of Chinese culture, customs and habits, history, business practice and current events. The class consists of reading, listening, discussion, network exploration, and conversational practice. The course is conducted in Mandarin. The course s objective is to teach about 500 Chinese words and Chinese expressions by the end of the program. Classes focus on teaching Chinese phonetics and tones, Chinese vocabulary, sentence structures and grammar using everyday topics. Phonetics, tone exercises and drills ensure that students learn the correct pronunciation and intonation from the beginning. Students will be introduced to the radical system (Chinese character composition), stroke orders and basic characters. Practical situational texts are used to provide a greater awareness of Chinese culture and society. At the end of this course, students should be able to engage in simple daily conversation and complete the beginner level ready for Elementary level Chinese II. 386 Chinese II Transcript Code: CHIN 2 Prerequisite: Chinese I Credit: 1 This course is designed to help students further develop basic Chinese language skills in speaking, reading, and writing of modern Chinese by combining traditional textbook material with hands on explorations of Chinese culture, customs and habits, history, business practice and current events. Students will learn an additional 500 Chinese words and expressions by the end of this course. Practical situational texts are used to provide a greater awareness of Chinese culture and society. Phonetics, tone exercises will be reinforced for correction pronunciation and intonation. At the end of this course, students should be able to converse on daily topics and express themselves using elementary sentence structures and complete the Elementary Chinese II level ready for the Intermediate level Chinese III. 387 Chinese III PreAP Transcript Code: CHIN 3 Prerequisite: Chinese II Credit: 1 This is a continuation of the study of Mandarin Chinese. Students will continue to learn additional vocabulary and sentences. Students attending these classes should have finished Chinese II or know more than 1000 Chinese words or expressions. The course s objective is to expand Chinese words and Chinese expressions up to 1800 by the end of the program. Classes focus on improving the conversational and reading skills in a more complicated sentence structures. Simple classic Chinese literature and Chinese business practice will be introduced. We will also discuss current events in Chinese. Our objective is to expand students awareness and vocabularies in fine art and business fields. Practical situational texts are used to provide a greater awareness of Chinese culture and society. Correct pronunciation and intonation will be reinforced. At the end of the course, students should be able to express themselves in different contexts using intermediate sentence structures, and complete the Intermediate level Chinese III progressing to the advanced level. 388 Chinese IV AP Language Transcript Code: APCH LAN Prerequisite: Chinese III PreAP Credit: 1 This course continues the study of Mandarin Chinese and follows the College Board curriculum to prepare students for the Advanced Placement exam. Students are required to take the AP Chinese Language exam. 297 Special Topics in Language and Culture Transcript Code: SPECTLC Prerequisite: One successful year of any foreign language and committee approval. Credit: 1 This course provides students with the study of world languages in the 21st century and an understanding of the two basic aspects of human existence: the nature of communication and the complexity of culture. This course meets the graduation requirement of a level II LOTE; however, this does not satisfy the college admissions requirement for 2nd year of LOTE. Fine Arts Students who have artistic talent and want to include AP Art in their 4-year plan have an opportunity to accelerate to Art II and retroactively earn their Art I credit. If you are interested, see your counselor for information. Fees may be applicable for all Fine Arts Courses. Check with your school for more information. 400 Art I Transcript Code: ART 1 Credit: 1 This is a one-year foundation course. Thorough application of the fundamentals of design will be used to develop basic skills and techniques as well as an understanding and appreciation of historical and contemporary art and artists. Studio activities include drawing, painting, photography, printmaking, ceramics and sculpture. This course is designed for students who plan to advance to higher level Art courses ina coherent sequence. The rigor of this course is designed for students going on to take Art II and beyond. 401 Art II Ceramics Transcript Code: ART2CRMC Prerequisite: Art I or Approved Art Accelerated Portfolio Credit: 1 This is a course in clay which encompasses both sculpture and pottery. Students will study the properties and processes of clay, including hand building, wheel throwing, kiln firing and glazing. Understanding and application of the Elements and Principles of Art and Design will guide the criteria. Integration of appreciation, aesthetics and history will add enrichment to the 05/09/2018 48 hands-on studio practice. 402 Art II Drawing Transcript Code: ART2DRAW Prerequisite: Art I or Approved Art Accelerated Portfolio Credit: 1 This is a one year course for students who wish to further develop drawing skills introduced in Art I. Students rely on direct observation of their environment, as well as imagination, memory, and their own life experiences to create expressive drawings. A variety of media, including pencil, colored pencil, charcoal, conte, pastel, pen and ink, and mixed media is employed to communicate personal themes. Important concepts include light and shadow, composition, perspective, and abstraction. 404 Art II Digital Art and Media I Transcript Code: ART2DGMD Prerequisite: Art I or Approved Art Accelerated Portfolio Credit: 1 Students will learn to create artwork on computers using the applications of Adobe Creative Suite. Digital Art will be produced in Photoshop or Illustrator. Digital cameras, graphics tablets, and scanners will be used to combine color graphics, digital photos, and art work created in traditional media. This course will explore animation using flash. Students will need to furnish a portable external drive for storing digital work ( , flash drive, thumb drive, etc.). 406 Art II Painting Transcript Code: ART2PATG Prerequisite: Art, Level I or Approved Art Accelerated Portfolio Credit: 1 This course includes a more in-depth study of Art I painting and drawing with additional media exploration and further development of problem-solving skills. Fees cover the price of sketchbooks, a canvas or panel for acrylic painting, paper and numerous drawing and painting mediums. Integration of art history, appreciation, aesthetics, and criticism will add enrichment to the hands-on studio practice. 407 Art II Photography Transcript Code: ART2PHTO Prerequisite: Art I or Approved Art Accelerated Portfolio Credit: 1 This course offers an in-depth study of the camera and photography techniques. Assignments are given to practice using the camera, requiring at least 25-30 shots per week as homework. Students will keep a portfolio of work. The focus will be solely on fine arts images. School using the traditional darkroom will teach film development and printing. Schools using a digital darkroom will teach Photoshop. Students in digital darkroom classes will need to furnish a portable external drive (flash drive, thumb drive, etc.) for storing digital work. 409 Art II Sculpture Transcript Code: ART2SCLP Prerequisite: Art I or Approved Art Accelerated Portfolio Credit: 1 This course will encompass the development of creative problem solving and practical skills in three-dimensional design. Clay and various other materials will be used. Many power and hand tools will be safely used while working with woods. Art history, appreciation, aesthetics and criticism will be integrated into studio practice. 415 Art III Ceramics Transcript Code: ART3CRMC Prerequisite: Art II in corresponding discipline. Credit: 1 Students will build on the ceramics skills and study learned in Ceramics II with an eye toward specialization. Relevance to college and career will be considered. Further development of skills, knowledge and appreciation is done through experimentation, research, and practice. 416 Art III Drawing Transcript Code: ART3DRAW Prerequisite: Art II in corresponding discipline. Credit: 1 Students will build on the drawings skills and study learned in Drawing with an eye toward specialization. Relevance to college and career will be considered. Further development of skills, knowledge and appreciation is done through experimentation, research, and practice. 418 Art III Digital Art and Media II Transcript Code: ART3DGMD Prerequisite: Art II in corresponding discipline. Credit: 1 Students will continue use of the software programs and equipment used in Digital Art and Media I. Additionally, students will create their own font in Fotographer. Students will explore 3-D rendering and animation. iMovie will be used for digital video and sound editing. The Internet will be accessed for information on artists and digital art. Digital art research will be presented to the class as a PowerPoint presentation. Students will create their own web pages to display their digital artwork. The lab fee will cover the cost of writable CD's, toner cartridges, paper, mat board, and personal print portfolios. 419 Art III Painting Transcript Code: ART3PATG Prerequisite: Art II in corresponding discipline. Credit: 1 This course will explore multiple styles, techniques and media in both painting and drawing from representation to abstraction. Media that will be used includes oils, acrylics, watercolors, pastels and inks. Art history, appreciation, aesthetics and criticism will be integrated with studio activities. There will be emphasis on individual style and development of personal portfolios. 420 Art III Photography Transcript Code: ART3PHTO Prerequisite: Art II in corresponding discipline. Credit: 1 Art III Photography is a continuation of Photography II with more advanced camera techniques and a broader scope of creative exploration. Students will need to furnish a portable external drive for storing digital work ( , flash drive, thumb drive, etc.). 422 Art III Sculpture Transcript Code: ART3SCLP Prerequisite: Art II in corresponding discipline. Credit: 1 This course will develop problem-solving skills while working three-dimensionally with various materials, which may include clay, wood, stone, and plaster as well as mixed media. Emphasis will be on exploring individual ideas. Art history, appreciation, aesthetics and criticism will be integrated with studio practice. 05/09/2018 49 438 Art IV Ceramics Transcript Code: ART4CRMC Prerequisite: Art III in corresponding discipline. Credit: 1 Students will resume Ceramics study begun in Art III with an eye toward specialization. 425 Art IV Drawing Transcript Code: ART4DRAW Prerequisite: Art III in corresponding discipline. Credit: 1 This is a continuation of skills and concepts from Art III with extensive individual exploration and college and career research. 427 Art IV Digital Art and Media III Transcript Code: ART4GDMD Prerequisite: Art III in corresponding discipline. Credit: 1 This is a continuation of skills and concepts from Digital Art and Media II with extensive individual exploration and independent study. Students will continue use of the software and equipment used in Digital Art and Media II. Students will need to furnish a portable external drive for storing digital work ( , flash drive, thumb drive, etc.) 428 Art IV Painting Transcript Code: ART4PATG Prerequisite: Art III in corresponding discipline. Credit: 1 This is a continuation of skills and concepts from Art III with extensive individual exploration and college and career research. 430 Art IV Sculpture Transcript Code: ART4SCLP Prerequisite: Art III in corresponding discipline. Credit: 1 This is a continuation of skills and concepts from Art III with extensive individual exploration and independent study. 432 Art IV Photography Transcript Code: ART4PHTO Prerequisite: Art III in corresponding discipline. Credit: 1 This course offers students an opportunity to choose a concentration in Photography with more in-depth study of advanced photography and individual portfolio development. Students will need to furnish a portable external drive for storing digital work ( , flash drive, thumb drive, etc.). 435 Art Drawing AP Transcript Code: APSTARTD Prerequisite: Drawing I or Painting I or portfolio review Credit: 1 The Drawing Portfolio is designed to address a broad interpretation of drawing issues. For example, painting, printmaking, studies for sculptures, some forms of design, and abstract and observational works would qualify as addressing drawing issues. College credit for Advanced Placement in studio art can be earned with their portfolio of work produced in this course and submitted for evaluation by the College Board. (Credit earned is dependent upon score received and policies of the university.) Studio practice emphasizes independent exploration and research, experimentation of materials and themes, concept development, some instructor-guided exercises, consideration of college and career choices, presentation and exhibition. Current trends will be examined through media studies and presentations by Admission counselors from recognized art schools. Fees include slide portfolio for exam submission material, and tools for multi-media exploration and presentation matting. Students are required to submit a portfolio for the AP Art Drawing exam. 396 Two-Dimensional Design Portfolio AP Transcript Code: AP2DDP Prerequisite: Art Level II course or portfolio review Credit: 1-2 The 2-D Design portfolio addresses a broad interpretation of Design. Any 2-D media including, but not limited to graphic design, typography, digital imaging, photography, collage, fabric design, weaving, illustration, painting, printmaking, etc., may be submitted. College credit for Advanced Placement in studio art can be earned with portfolio of work produced in these courses and submitted and evaluated to the College Board at examination time. (Credit earned is dependent upon score received and policies of the university). Studio practice emphasizes independent exploration and research, experimentation of materials and themes, concept development, some instructor-guided exercises, consideration of college and career choices, presentation and exhibition. Current trends will be examined through media studies and presentations by Admissions Counselors from recognized art schools. Fees include the slide portfolio for exam submission material, and tools for multi-media exploration and presentation matting. Students are required to submit a portfolio for the AP Two-Dimensional Art exam. 398 Three-Dimensional Design Portfolio AP Transcript Code: AP3DDP Prerequisite: Ceramics I or Sculpture I Credit: 1-2 The 3-D design portfolio addresses a broad interpretation of design. Any 3-D media including but not limited to Ceramics may be submitted. College credit for Advanced Placement in studio art can be earned with portfolio of work produced in this course and submitted and evaluated to the College Board at examination time. (Credit earned is dependent upon score received and policies of the university). Studio practice emphasizes independent exploration and research, experimentation of materials and themes, concept development, some instructor-guided exercises, consideration of college and career choices, presentation and exhibition. Current trends will be examined through media studies and presentations by Admission counselors from recognized art schools. Students are required to submit a portfolio for the AP Three-Dimensional Art exam. 437 Art History AP Transcript Code: APHISART Prerequisite or concurrent: World History (AP recommended) Credit: 1 This is a course of study aimed at students who might be interested in taking the Advanced Placement Art History Exam for college credit. It covers the same basic material as Art History, but in greater depth. This course is especially helpful in developing analytical skills and gaining a deeper understanding of world cultures, history and religion. It is also a great complement to AP European History or AP English. Students are required to take the AP Art History exam. 05/09/2018 50 439 Art Appreciation Transcript Code: ART1APP Credit: 1 This is a one-year foundation course. Application of the fundamentals of design will be used to develop basic skills and techniques as well as an understanding and appreciation of historical and contemporary art and artists. This course is taught from a survey of Art perspective with limited studio activities in drawing, painting, photography, printmaking, ceramics and sculpture. This course is an appropriate type of Fine Arts Credit for those who do not wish to continue in Art. Also, this course provides an appropriate Fine Arts elective option for students who move in and /or are trying to earn Fine Arts Credit late in HS 866 Digital Art and Animation Transcript Code: TADGAA Credit: 1 Students will explore the world of digital imagery, putting their creativity and imaginations to work and translating their ideas into graphic designs and animations. Using industry-leading software tools they learn to take their ideas from visualization to design, using their computer skills to produce a wide variety of finished products. The course includes introduction to Adobe s Illustrator and Photoshop and Macromedia s. 440 Theatre I Transcript Code: TH1 Credit: 1 Theatre Arts I is a participatory survey course designed for students who are interested in learning about all areas of theatre. Students will learn the various techniques of acting including creative dramatics, character interpretation, and staging; explore theatre production concepts and skills including makeup, costuming, and set design; and participate in criticism by attending two major productions outside of class. Students may choose to participate in co-curricular drama activities by the department. 441 Theatre II Transcript Code: TH2 Prerequisite: Theatre I Credit: 1 This course is designed to allow the student who successfully completed Theatre Arts I to continue to study acting theory and techniques as well as performance opportunities. The class introduces the students to directing and theatre history. Participation in co-curricular activities outside of the class is required. 442 Theatre III Transcript Code: TH3 Prerequisite: Theatre II Credit: 1 This course is a continuation of basic skills and activities begun in Theatre arts I and II. Activities will include opportunities to further develop personal acting techniques and performing skills. Students will perform scenes and plays from various theatrical periods and styles and explore career opportunities in theatre. Other projects include playwritings. Participation in co-curricular activities outside of the class is required. 443 Theatre IV Transcript Code: TH4 Prerequisite: Theatre III Credit: 1 Theatre Arts IV is designed as a workshop/seminar to challenge the advanced theatre student with in-depth study of advanced acting techniques including research in theatre topics, development of directing, and exploration of career opportunities in theatre. Production participation (including after school rehearsals, meetings, and performances) is required by all Theatre Arts IV students. 445 Theatre Production I Transcript Code: TH1PROD Prerequisite: Theatre II and/or Audition Credit: 1 These courses are designed for the advanced theatre student who is involved in all of the major productions in the department. This will be a workshop atmosphere that will include production meetings, work on the shows, and plans for other co-curricular theatre activities. Leadership training, management, and individual development, research, and projects are stressed. Production participation (including after school production work) is required of all Theatre Production students. 446 Theatre Production II Transcript Code: TH2PROD Prerequisite: Theatre Production I Credit: 1 447 Theatre Production III Transcript Code: TH3PROD Prerequisite: Theatre Production II Credit: 1 448 Theatre Production IV Transcript Code: TH4PROD Prerequisite: Theatre Production III Credit: 1 Through participation, students will gain experience in various areas of production, including, but not limited to, acting, stage management, scenery, lighting, props, costumes, or make-up. Motivated and interested students may also have opportunities in design and construction/execution of scenery, lighting, costuming, make-up, or props. Production participation (including after-school rehearsals) is required. 449 Musical Theatre I Transcript Code: MUSTH1 Prerequisite: Theatre Production III Credit: 1 This course is designed for those students who are interested in vocal music, theatre, and dance. Students will learn correct vocal production, musical theatre acting style, and various forms of dance including ballet, tap, and jazz. Students enrolled in this course are required to participate in the theatre department s fall musical production. Dance credit will be received for this course. 454 Musical Theatre II Transcript Code: MUSTH2 Credit: 1 529 Musical Theatre III Transcript Code: MUSTH3 Credit: 1 553 Musical Theatre IV Transcript Code: MUSTH4 Credit: 1 This course is designed for those students who are interested in vocal music, theatre, and dance. Students will learn correct vocal production, musical theatre acting style, and various forms of dance including ballet, tap, and jazz. Students enrolled in this course are required to participate in the theatre department s fall musical production. Dance credit will be received for this course. 455 Technical Theatre I Transcript Code: TH1TECH Credit: 1 Technical Theatre I, II, III, and IV provide a workshop atmosphere for students to have the opportunity to learn the various aspects of technical production by designing and building shows, including areas in lighting design, set design, makeup design, costume design, properties, sound, public relations, and 05/09/2018 51 theatre management. Advanced students will assume greater responsibilities in becoming crew heads, designers, and running crews for the 6 to 10 productions in the theatre. Students will explore career opportunities in technical theatre. Production participation (including after school production work) is required for all Tech I-IV students. 456 Technical Theatre II Transcript Code: TH2TECH 457 Technical Theatre III Transcript Code: TH3TECH 458 Technical Theatre IV Transcript Code: TH4TECH Credit: 1 This course is a workshop atmosphere for the development of advanced technical theatre skills. Students will develop public relations skills for use in the theatre, attend live theatre events, and explore career opportunities for theatre. Student participation (including after school rehearsals) in all Theatre Arts productions is required. 459 Directing Seminar Transcript Code: DIR SEMR LC Prerequisite: 3 previous Theatre Arts credits Credit: Local Credit Students will direct a play for public audience. Students will select a script, analyze it, design the production, cast, and rehearse the actors. Prior approval from drama teacher is required. 391 Varsity Band I Transcript Code: MUS1BAND 392 Varsity Band II Transcript Code: MUS2BAND 393 Varsity Band III Transcript Code: MUS3BAND 394 Varsity Band IV Transcript Code: MUS4BAND Prerequisite: By audition Credit: 1 This performing group is the varsity ensemble and is designed to challenge those students who have achieved the highest musical standards and skills. The Wind Ensemble performs numerous concerts, marches at all football games and competes in both TMEA and UIL activities as well as various school and community events. Students are given opportunities for mental and physical discipline, citizenship through group endeavor, physical conditioning, cultural growth, skills in making musical value judgments through critical listening, skills in music theory, and proper instrumental techniques. Students will participate in small group playing experiences, develop new awareness of ensemble music literature, study ensemble techniques, and refine musical and technical skills. Participation in summer marching camp and all out-of-school performances and rehearsals is required. 395 Percussion Battery I Transcript Code: MUS1BAND 411 Percussion Battery II Transcript Code: MUS2BAND 412 Percussion Battery III Transcript Code: MUS3BAND 413 Percussion Battery IV Transcript Code: MUS4BAND Prerequisite: By audition Credit: 1 This course is reserved for percussion students who have achieved a high level of success on their instruments. The ensemble performs numerous concerts with the band classes throughout the year, participates in UIL and TMEA sponsored events and participates in the marching band. Participation in summer marching camp and all out of school performances and rehearsals is required. 464 Percussion Pit I Transcript Code: MUS1BAND 474 Percussion Pit II Transcript Code: MUS2BAND 479 Percussion Pit III Transcript Code: MUS3BAND 484 Percussion Pit IV Transcript Code: MUS4BAND Prerequisite: By audition Credit: 1 This course is reserved for percussion students who have achieved a high level of success on their instruments. The ensemble performs numerous concerts with the band classes throughout the year, participates in UIL and TMEA sponsored events and participates in the marching band. Participation in summer marching camp and all out of school performances and rehearsals is required. 465 Concert Band I Transcript Code: MUS1BAND 466 Concert Band II Transcript Code: MUS2BAND 467 Concert Band III Transcript Code: MUS3BAND 468 Concert Band IV Transcript Code: MUS4BAND Prerequisite: By audition Credit: 1 This course is a foundation course for students who need assistance toward future membership in the Symphonic Band or Wind Ensemble. Students are given opportunities for mental and physical discipline, citizenship through group endeavor, physical conditioning, cultural growth, skills in making musical value judgments through critical listening, skills in music theory, and proper instrumental techniques. The Concert Band performs concerts, marches at all football games and competes in both TMEA and UIL sponsored events, as well as various school and community events. Participation in summer marching camp and all out-of-school performances and rehearsals is required. 470 Instrumental Ensemble I Transcript Code: MUS1INEN 471 Instrumental Ensemble II Transcript Code: MUS2INEN 472 Instrumental Ensemble III Transcript Code: MUS3INEN 473 Instrumental Ensemble IV Transcript Code: MUS4INEN Prerequisite: By audition Credit: 1 This course is designed for students who desire independent instrumental study. The course is self-paced and monitored regularly by the ensemble director who approves the student from enrollment. Students in this course are expected to demonstrate advanced levels of musical skill, and are responsible for participation in TMEA and UIL activities, as well as program requirements. Enrollment in this class must be concurrent with membership in another instrumental ensemble. 480 Jazz Ensemble I Transcript Code: MUS1JZBN 481 Jazz Ensemble II Transcript Code: MUS2JZBN 482 Jazz Ensemble III Transcript Code: MUS3JZBN 483 Jazz Ensemble IV Transcript Code: MUS4JZBN Prerequisite: By audition Credit: 1 This is a participatory instrumental ensemble class that focuses on the learning, development and performance of all classifications of jazz music, with a strong emphasis on improvisation and application of music theory. The jazz band is a performance based organization and participation at out-of-school performances and rehearsals is required. Students must participate in 05/09/2018 52 one of the parent instrumental organizations (band, orchestra) in order to enroll in this class. 485 Percussion Ensemble I Transcript Code: MUS1BAND 486 Percussion Ensemble II Transcript Code: MUS2BAND 487 Percussion Ensemble III Transcript Code: MUS3BAND 488 Percussion Ensemble IV Transcript Code: MUS4BAND Prerequisite: By audition Credit: 1 This course is reserved for percussion students who have achieved a high level of success on their instruments. The ensemble performs numerous concerts with the band classes throughout the year, participates in UIL and TMEA sponsored events and participates in the marching band. Participation in summer marching camp and all out-of-school performances and rehearsals is required. 489 Camerata Orchestra I Transcript Code: MUS1ORCH 514 Camerata Orchestra II Transcript Code: MUS2ORCH 519 Camerata Orchestra III Transcript Code: MUS3ORCH 524 Camerata Orchestra IV Transcript Code: MUS4ORCH Prerequisite: By audition Credit: 1 This performing group is the varsity ensemble and is designed to challenge those students who have achieved the highest musical standards and skills. Each orchestra member will be required to participate in UIL and TMEA contests, civic concerts, orchestra, festivals, formal concerts and other performance obligations. Students are given opportunities for mental and physical discipline, citizenship through group endeavor, physical conditioning, cultural growth, skills in making musical value judgments through critical listening, skills in music theory, and proper instrumental techniques. Attendance of out-of-school rehearsals and performances is required. Open to orchestral string instrumentalists only. 490 Symphonic Band I Transcript Code: MUS1BAND 491 Symphonic Band II Transcript Code: MUS2BAND 492 Symphonic Band III Transcript Code: MUS3BAND 493 Symphonic Band IV Transcript Code: MUS3BAND Prerequisite: By audition Credit: 1 This is the non-varsity band and performs numerous concerts, marches at football games, competes in both TMEA and UIL activities, as well as various school and community events. Students are given opportunities for mental and physical discipline, citizenship through group endeavor, physical conditioning, cultural growth, skills in making musical value judgments through critical listening, skills in music theory, and proper instrumental techniques. This ensemble will rehearse and perform music from medium to difficult level and private lessons are strongly encouraged. Participation in summer marching camp and all out-of-school performances and rehearsals is required. 494 Chamber Orchestra I Transcript Code: MUS1ORCH 499 Chamber Orchestra II Transcript Code: MUS2ORCH 504 Chamber Orchestra III Transcript Code: MUS3ORCH 509 Chamber Orchestra IV Transcript Code: MUS4ORCH Prerequisite: By audition Credit: 1 This performing group is the varsity ensemble and is designed to challenge those students who have achieved the highest musical standards and skills. Each orchestra member will be required to participate in UIL and TMEA contests, civic concerts, orchestra, festivals, formal concerts and other performance obligations. Students are given opportunities for mental and physical discipline, citizenship through group endeavor, physical conditioning, cultural growth, skills in making musical value judgments through critical listening, skills in music theory, and proper instrumental techniques. Attendance of out-of-school rehearsals and performances is required. Open to orchestral string instrumentalists only. 495 Wind Ensemble I Transcript Code: MS1BAND 496 Wind Ensemble II Transcript Code: MUS2BAND 497 Wind Ensemble III Transcript Code: MUS3BAND 498 Wind Ensemble IV Transcript Code: MUS4BAND Prerequisite: By audition Credit: .5 - 1 This performing group is the varsity ensemble and is designed to challenge those students who have achieved the highest musical standards and skills. The Wind Ensemble performs numerous concerts, marches at all football games and competes in both TMEA and UIL activities as well as various school and community events. Students are given opportunities for mental and physical discipline, citizenship through group endeavor, physical conditioning, cultural growth, skills in making musical value judgments through critical listening, skills in music theory, and proper instrumental techniques. Students will participate in small group playing experiences, develop new awareness of ensemble music literature, study ensemble techniques, and refine musical and technical skills. Participation in summer marching camp and all out-of-school performances and rehearsals is required. 500 Philharmonic Orchestra I Transcript Code: MUS1ORCH 501 Philharmonic Orchestra II Transcript Code: MUS2ORCH 502 Philharmonic Orchestra III Transcript Code: MUS3ORCH 503 Philharmonic Orchestra IV Transcript Code: MUS4ORCH Prerequisite: By audition Credit: 1 This course is a foundation course for students who need assistance on their orchestra skills in order to be better prepared for Symphonic or Philharmonic Orchestra. Students are given opportunities for mental and physical discipline, citizenship through group endeavor, physical conditioning, cultural growth, skills in making musical value judgments through critical listening, skills in music theory, and proper instrumental techniques. 505 Symphonic Orchestra I Transcript Code: MUS1ORCH 506 Symphonic Orchestra II Transcript Code: MUS2ORCH 507 Symphonic Orchestra III Transcript Code: MUS3ORCH 508 Symphonic Orchestra IV Transcript Code: MUS4ORCH Prerequisite: By audition Credit: 1 This is the non-varsity ensemble with moderate performance demands. The orchestra will participate in concerts, UIL and TMEA events. Students are given opportunities for mental and physical discipline, citizenship through group endeavor, physical conditioning, cultural growth, skills in making musical 05/09/2018 53 value judgments through critical listening, skills in music theory, and proper instrumental techniques. Attendance at out-of-school rehearsals and performances is required. Open to orchestra string instrumentalists only. 534 Sinfonietta Orchestra I Transcript Code: MUS1ORCH 539 Sinfonietta Orchestra II Transcript Code: MUS2ORCH 547 Sinfonietta Orchestra III Transcript Code: MUS3ORCH 548 Sinfonietta Orchestra IV Transcript Code: MUS4ORCH Prerequisite: By audition Credit: 1 This is the non-varsity ensemble with moderate performance demands. The orchestra will participate in concerts, UIL and TMEA events. Students are given opportunities for mental and physical discipline, citizenship through group endeavor, physical conditioning, cultural growth, skills in making musical value judgments through critical listening, skills in music theory, and proper instrumental techniques. Attendance at out-of-school rehearsals and performances is required. Open to orchestra string instrumentalists only. 450 NV Tenor-Bass Choir I Transcript Code: MUS1CHOR 451 NV Tenor-Bass Choir II Transcript Code: MUS2CHOR 452 NV Tenor-Bass Choir III Transcript Code: MUS3CHOR 453 NV Tenor-Bass Choir IV Transcript Code: MUS4CHOR Prerequisite: By audition Credit: 1 The Non Varsity Tenor-Base Choir is a choral organization for Tenor-Bass voices with moderate performance demands. The choir will participate in concerts, TMEA and UIL events. The primary purpose of this choir is to serve as a preparatory choir, stressing vocal fundamentals and music reading skills. Participation at out of school rehearsals and performances is required. 510 A Cappella Choir I Transcript Code: MUS1CHOR 511 A Cappella Choir II Transcript Code: MUS2CHOR 512 A Cappella Choir III Transcript Code: MUS3CHOR 513 A Cappella Choir IV Transcript Code: MUS4CHOR Prerequisite: By audition Credit: 1 A Cappella Choir is the most advanced of all available choir course offerings. Considerable demands are placed upon each choir member with regard to UIL contest preparation, civic concerts, choir festivals, formal concerts and other performance obligations. Participation at out-of-school rehearsals and performances is required. 515 Chamber Choir I Transcript Code: MUS1VOEN 516 Chamber Choir II Transcript Code: MUS2VOEN 517 Chamber Choir III Transcript Code: MUS3VOEN 518 Chamber Choir IV Transcript Code: MUS4VOEN Prerequisite: By audition Credit: 1 The Chamber Choir is a small, highly selective mixed choir. The main objective of this choir is to prepare and perform music from all musical time periods which are suitable for Chamber Choir. Considerable demands will be placed upon students in this ensemble with regard to UIL and TMEA contest preparation, civic concerts, choir festivals, formal concerts, and other performance obligations as scheduled. Participation at out-of-school rehearsals and performances is required. 520 V Tenor-Bass Choir I Transcript Code: MUS1CHOR 521 V Tenor-Bass Choir II Transcript Code: MUS2CHOR 522 V Tenor-Bass Choir III Transcript Code: MUS3CHOR 523 V Tenor-Bass Choir IV Transcript Code: MUS4CHOR Prerequisite: By audition Credit: 1 The Varsity Tenor-Base Choir is a choral organization for Tenor and Bass voices with moderate performance demands. The choir will participate in concerts, TMEA and UIL events. The primary purpose of this choir is to serve as a preparatory choir, stressing vocal fundamentals and music reading skills. Participation at out-of-school rehearsals and performances is required. 525 Sub NV Treble Choir I Transcript Code: MUS1CHOR 526 Sub NV Treble Choir II Transcript Code: MUS2CHOR 527 Sub NV Treble Choir III Transcript Code: MUS3CHOR 528 Sub NV Treble Choir IV Transcript Code: MUS4CHOR Prerequisite: By audition Credit: 1 The Sub Non Varsity Treble Choir is a choral organization for Soprano and Alto voices with moderate performance demands. . The choir will participate in concerts, TMEA and UIL events. The primary purpose of this choir is to serve as a preparatory choir, stressing vocal fundamentals and music reading skills. Participation at out-of-school rehearsals and performances is required. 530 NV Treble Choir I Transcript Code: MUS1CHOR 531 NV Treble Choir II Transcript Code: MUS2CHOR 532 NV Treble Choir III Transcript Code: MUS3CHOR 533 NV Treble Choir IV Transcript Code: MUS4CHOR Prerequisite: By audition Credit: 1 The Non Varsity Treble Choir is a choral organization for Soprano and Alto voices with moderate performance demands. The choir will participate in concerts, TMEA and UIL events. The primary purpose of this choir is to serve as a preparatory choir, stressing vocal fundamentals and music reading skills. Participation at out-of-school rehearsals and performances is required. 535 Varsity Treble Choir I Transcript Code: MUS1CHOR 536 Varsity Treble Choir II Transcript Code: MUS2CHOR 537 Varsity Treble Choir III Transcript Code: MUS3CHOR 538 Varsity Treble Choir IV Transcript Code: MUS4CHOR Prerequisite: By audition Credit: 1 Varsity Treble Choir is a choral organization with stringent performance demands. Considerable demands are placed upon each choir member with regard to UIL and TMEA contest participation, civic concerts, choir festivals, formal concerts, and other performance obligations as scheduled. Participation at out-of-school rehearsals and at all performances is required. 540 Vocal Ensemble I Transcript Code: MUS1VOEN 541 Vocal Ensemble II Transcript Code: MUS2VOEN 542 Vocal Ensemble III Transcript Code: MUS3VOEN 543 Vocal Ensemble IV 05/09/2018 54 Transcript Code: MUS4VOEN Prerequisite: By audition Credit: 1 550 Music Theory I Transcript Code: MUSSMT1 Credit: .5 1 Grades: 10-12 This is an academically rigorous course designed to enrich and prepare students who desire to study music at an advanced level. Fundamentals of music will be reinforced and students will develop basic music literacy. Elements in this course will include notation, melody, harmony, rhythm, and musical terminology. Students desiring to take this course must demonstrate readiness with aural skills and written knowledge. This readiness can be validated through successful completion of at least one year in a high school level music ensemble or through independent study with a minimum of 85% mastery of an examination for readiness. 552 Music Theory AP Transcript Code: APMUSTHY Prerequisite: Music Theory I Credit: 1 AP Music Theory is designed for students who will pursue music as a career or desire to further enrich their music education. The main emphasis is placed on elements of music from the Common Practice period (1600-1750), however music of other stylistic periods will also be studied (Medieval, Renaissance, Romantic, 20th Century, and modern music). The focus of this course is to prepare students to take the AP Music Theory exam and/or similar coursework at the collegiate level. Students desiring to take this course must demonstrate readiness with aural skills and written knowledge. This readiness can be validated by successful completion of the Music Theory I course or through a minimum of 85% mastery of an examination for Music Theory AP readiness. 555 Dance I Transcript Code: DANCE 1 Credit: 1 This is a foundation course, balancing the areas of terminology, technique and movement. Students will learn and perform dance through a broad presentation of skills, technical terminology, historical background, cultural and artistic diversity. Students are given the opportunity to experience movement physically and visually; experimenting/exploring within the creative process of group/individual choreography through the dance genres of ballet, modern, folk/social, jazz and ethnic. Fees cover the cost of necessary dancewear. 556 Dance II Transcript Code: DANCE 2 Prerequisite: Dance I Credit: 1 This course provides an in-depth study of dance terminology, technique/style, music appreciation, rhythmic analysis and factors that influence movement. Studies will also increase kinesthetic awareness, develop movement memory and allow students to conceptualize movement ideas/motifs through improvisation and composition. Students will be required to participate in performances in and out of the regular school day. Fees cover the cost of necessary dancewear. 557 Dance III Transcript Code: DANCE 3 Prerequisite: Dance II Credit: 1 This course allows dance students the opportunity to acquire advanced skills in the fundamental dance genres covered in Dance I and II. Students will develop an awareness of space, time, and energy as design factors in dance performance and choreography; respond to tempo, meter, accent, and phrasing; manipulate qualities of movement in designing dance studies; develop musicality in performing dance phrases/sequences and compositional studies; and explore historical influences of dance. Students will be required to participate in performances in and out of the regular school day. Fees cover the cost of necessary dancewear. 558 Dance IV Transcript Code: DANCE 4 Prerequisite: Dance III Credit: 1 This course stresses more advanced dance techniques with each student being encouraged to choreograph a complete/complex movement statement, present movement studies at the performance level, evaluate movement ideas, and express concrete or abstract ideas in movement. Students will explore and analyze historical influences of dance, analyze dance concerts and respond with a knowledgeable understanding of dance as an art form. Students will be required to participate in performances in and out of the regular school day. Fees cover the cost of necessary dancewear. 560 Cheer Dance I Transcript Code: DANCE 1 561 Cheer Dance II Transcript Code: DANCE 2 562 Cheer Dance III Transcript Code: DANCE 3 563 Cheer Dance IV Transcript Code: DANCE 4 Credit: 1 565 Drill Dance I Transcript Code: DANCE 1 566 Drill Dance II Transcript Code: DANCE 2 567 Drill Dance III Transcript Code: DANCE 3 568 Drill Dance IV Transcript Code: DANCE 4 Credit: 1 This is a competitive dance team which provides entertainment for various school activities, athletic events, community events as well as participating in dance team competitions and camps. Participation in after school rehearsals and performance is required. Team members will incur team related expenses. Guidelines, rules, and regulations must be followed. The drill team is open to any girl who can meet the eligibility requirements and can qualify before a panel of judges in a yearly audition in the Spring Semester. Drill Team is a full year course. 570 Choreography Transcript Code: CHOREOGR LC Prerequisite: Dance III (557) Credit: Local credit This course is the foundation for students who desire an introduction to the area of dance production and choreography. This course will offer a wide variety of topics including lighting, costuming, make-up, space, design, time sequence, music, and stage workings. Students will be required to participate in performances in and out of the regular school day. 571 Dance I: Break Dance Transcript Code: DANCE 1 572 Dance II: Break Dance Transcript Code: DANCE 2 573 Dance III: Break Dance Transcript Code: DANCE 3 Credit: 1 This course is a performance-based class 05/09/2018 55 which provides entertainment for various school activities, athletic events, and community events. Participation in after school rehearsals and performances is required. Placement in this course is by audition. Health and Physical Education 080H Health Transcript Code: HLTH ED Credit: .5 This course helps students acquire the information necessary to become healthy adults and learn behaviors in which they should or should not participate. Students use problem solving, research and goal setting to gain knowledge and skills useful in making decisions in the areas of nutrition, CPR and First Aid, maturity, diseases (including STDs) and drug use. 5751 Foundations of Personal Fitness Transcript Code: PEFOUND Credit: .5 - 1 The course teaches students about the process of becoming fit as well as achieving some degree of fitness within the class. The concept of wellness is the cornerstone of this course and students design their own personal fitness program. 5761 Aerobic Activities Transcript Code: PEAA Credit: .5 - 1 Students acquire the knowledge and skills for movement that provide the foundation for enjoyment and continue social development through physical activity. 5771 Adventure/Outdoor Education Transcript Code: PEADA Credit: .5 - 1 Students enrolled in Adventure/Outdoor Education will acquire skills necessary for outdoor education activities such as backpacking, boating, camping, hiking, orienteering, fishing, water sports and/or water safety. Students will have an understanding of the rules/laws, skills, and safety precautions for all outdoor education activities. Training for skills/competencies in Adventure/Outdoor education will take place on campus, although some field trips are possible. Students will be asked to develop and begin appropriate conditioning programs for Outdoor Education activities. 5781 Individual/Team Sports Transcript Code: PEITS Credit: .5 - 1 Individual/Team Sports focuses on skill development and game concept through participation in individual and team activities. This course provides an opportunity for students to acquire skill related fitness through participation in individual and team sports. Students will be involved in a variety of sports that may include archery, badminton, golf, handball, recreational games, table tennis, track and field, bounceball, basketball, volleyball, softball, flag football, soccer, and weight training. 5851 Baseball I Transcript Code: SUBATH1 5852 Baseball II Transcript Code: SUBATH2 5853 Baseball III Transcript Code: SUBATH3 5854 Baseball IV Transcript Code: SUBATH4 Credit: .5 - 1 5881 Basketball Boys I Transcript Code: SUBATH1 5882 Basketball Boys II Transcript Code: SUBATH2 5883 Basketball Boys III Transcript Code: SUBATH3 5884 Basketball Boys IV Transcript Code: SUBATH4 Credit: .5 1 5911 Basketball Girls I Transcript Code: SUBATH1 5912 Basketball Girls II Transcript Code: SUBATH2 5913 Basketball Girls III Transcript Code: SUBATH3 5914 Basketball Girls IV Transcript Code: SUBATH4 Credit: .5 - 1 5951 Cheerleading PE Transcript Code: SUBCHLDG Credit: .5 - 1 The cheerleading team is a group which promotes school spirit at athletic events and community activities. The cheerleading team is open to anyone who can meet the eligibility requirements and who can qualify before a panel of tryout judges in the spring of each year. Numerous afterschool practices and out-of-school performances as well as personal expense will be required. Successful completion of Cheerleading will earn credit of Physical Education equivalency. 5991 Cross Country Boys I Transcript Code: SUBATH1 5992 Cross Country Boys II Transcript Code: SUBATH2 5993 Cross Country Boys III Transcript Code: SUBATH3 5994 Cross Country Boys IV Transcript Code: SUBATH4 Credit: .5 - 1 6001 Cross Country Girls I Transcript Code: SUBATH1 6002 Cross Country Girls II Transcript Code: SUBATH2 6003 Cross Country Girls III Transcript Code: SUBATH3 6004 Cross Country Girls IV Transcript Code: SUBATH4 Credit: .5 1 6011 Dance Aerobic Activities Transcript Code: PEAA Credit: .5 - 1 6051 Diving I Transcript Code: SUBATH1 6052 Diving II Transcript Code: SUBATH2 6053 Diving III Transcript Code: SUBATH3 6054 Diving IV Transcript Code: SUBATH4 Credit: .5 - 1 6061 Drill Team PE Transcript Code: SUBDT Credit: .5 - 1 The drill team is a precision drill team which provides entertainment for various school activities, athletic halftimes, community activities, charity organizations, etc. The drill team is open to any girl who can meet the eligibility requirements and can qualify before a panel of tryout judges in the spring of each year. Although the drill team is an elective course, numerous after-school practices will be required. Successful completion of the fall semester of Drill Team will earn credit of a Physical Education equivalency. Drill team members earn credit of Drill Team Dance in the spring semester. 6101 Football I Transcript Code: SUBATH1 6102 Football II Transcript Code: SUBATH2 05/09/2018 56 6103 Football III Transcript Code: SUBATH3 6104 Football IV Transcript Code: SUBATH4 Credit: .5 - 1 6131 Golf Boys I Transcript Code: SUBATH1 6132 Golf Boys II Transcript Code: SUBATH2 6133 Golf Boys III Transcript Code: SUBATH3 6134 Golf Boys IV Transcript Code: SUBATH4 Credit: .5 1 6161 Golf Girls I Transcript Code: SUBATH1 6162 Golf Girls II Transcript Code: SUBATH2 6163 Golf Girls III Transcript Code: SUBATH3 6164 Golf Girls IV Transcript Code: SUBATH4 Credit: .5 - 1 6191 Soccer Boys I Transcript Code: SUBATH1 6192 Soccer Boys II Transcript Code: SUBATH2 6193 Soccer Boys III Transcript Code: SUBATH3 6194 Soccer Boys IV Transcript Code: SUBATH4 Credit: .5 1 6221 Soccer Girls I Transcript Code: SUBATH1 6222 Soccer Girls II Transcript Code: SUBATH2 6223 Soccer Girls III Transcript Code: SUBATH3 6224 Soccer Girls IV Transcript Code: SUBATH4 Credit: .5 - 1 6251 Softball I Transcript Code: SUBATH1 6252 Softball II Transcript Code: SUBATH2 6253 Softball III Transcript Code: SUBATH3 6254 Softball IV Transcript Code: SUBATH4 Credit: .5 - 1 6261 Swim I Transcript Code: SUBATH1 6262 Swim II Transcript Code: SUBATH2 6263 Swim III Transcript Code: SUBATH3 6264 Swim IV Transcript Code: SUBATH4 Credit: .5 - 1 6281 Tennis I Transcript Code: SUBATH1 6282 Tennis II Transcript Code: SUBATH2 6283 Tennis III Transcript Code: SUBATH3 6284 Tennis IV Transcript Code: SUBATH4 Credit: .5 1 6311 Track Boys I Transcript Code: SUBATH1 6312 Track Boys II Transcript Code: SUBATH2 6313 Track Boys III Transcript Code: SUBATH3 6314 Track Boys IV Transcript Code: SUBATH4 Credit: .5 - 1 6321 Track Girls I Transcript Code: SUBATH1 6322 Track Girls II Transcript Code: SUBATH2 6323 Track Girls III Transcript Code: SUBATH3 6324 Track Girls IV Transcript Code: SUBATH4 Credit: .5 - 1 6341 Volleyball I Transcript Code: SUBATH1 6342 Volleyball II Transcript Code: SUBATH2 6343 Volleyball III Transcript Code: SUBATH3 6344 Volleyball IV Transcript Code: SUBATH4 Credit: .5 - 1 6371 Wrestling I Transcript Code: SUBATH1 6372 Wrestling II Transcript Code: SUBATH2 6373 Wrestling III Transcript Code: SUBATH3 6374 Wrestling IV Transcript Code: SUBATH4 Credit: .5 - 1 6381 Marching Band I PE Transcript Code: SUBMB Prerequisite: By audition Credit: 1 6451 Off-Campus PE I Transcript Code: SUBPRO1 6452 Off-Campus PE II Transcript Code: SUBPRO2 6453 Off-Campus PE III Transcript Code: SUBPRO3 6454 Off-Campus PE IV Transcript Code: SUBPRO4 Credit: .5 - 1 6471 Color Guard I Transcript Code: SUBMB 6472 Color Guard II Transcript Code: DANCE2 6473 Color Guard III Transcript Code: DANCE3 6474 Color Guard IV Transcript Code: DANCE4 Credit: .5 - 1 8801 ROTC 1 PE Transcript Code: SUBJ1 Credit: 1 05/09/2018 57 Career and Technical Education Fees may be applicable. Check with your school for more information. Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources K100 Principles of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Transcript Code: PRINAFR Credit: 1 Enhances the agricultural comprehension of young adults. Includes agricultural career development, leadership, communications and personal finances. This course also includes the overview of soil and plants, animals, and agricultural construction. K102 Livestock Production Prerequisite: Principles of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources (recommended) Transcript Code: LIVEPROD Credit: 1 Introduces the common veterinary skills and procedures used on livestock, anatomy of livestock, genetics and reproduction, and diseases that can affect all livestock animals. This course is recommended for those that have an interest in the Veterinary Science field. K103H Small Animal Management Prerequisite: Principles of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources (recommended) Transcript Code: SMANIMGT Credit: .5 Focuses on working in small animal industry, animal rights and welfare, career opportunity in small animal care. This course is recommended for those that have an interest in the Veterinary Science field. K104H Equine Science Prerequisite: Principles of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources (recommended) Transcript Code: EQUINSCI Credit: .5 Develop knowledge and skills pertaining to the selection, nutrition, reproduction, health, and management of horses. This course is recommended for those that have an interest in the Veterinary Science field. K105 Veterinary Medical Applications Prerequisites: Principles of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources, Small Animal Management and either Equine Science or Livestock Production (recommended) Transcript Code: VETMEDAP Credit: 1 Develop and expand the knowledge and techniques skills pertaining to Veterinary Technical Assistant area. This course is designed as a laboratory-oriented course that allows students hands-on experience within the area of diagnostic testing, client records, employer/employee relationship, and techniques used in surgical practices. Students are required to complete an internship with licensed Veterinarian in order to take the state certification test for Veterinary Assistant Level I. K106 Advanced Animal Science Prerequisite: Vet Med AP Transcript Code: ADVANSCI Credit: 1 Develop and investigate the scientific and technological dimensions of scientific animal agriculture, genetics, and reproduction, anatomy and physiology of various livestock species, nutritional requirements, and disease and parasites of livestock. This class is recommended for those students with an interest in Veterinary Science. K107H Professional Standards in Agribusiness Transcript Code: PROSAFNR Credit: .5 Prerequisite: Principles of Agriculture (Recommended) This course primarily focuses on leadership, communication, employer-employee relations, and problem solving as they relate to agribusiness. K108 Agribusiness Management & Marketing Transcript Code: AGRBUSMM Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Professional Standards in Agribusiness (recommended) Agribusiness Management and Marketing is designed to provide a foundation to agribusiness management and the free enterprise system. Instruction includes the use of economic principles such as supply and demand, budgeting, record keeping, finance, risk management, business law, marketing, and careers in agribusiness. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course. K109 Mathematical Applications in Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources Transcript Code: MATHAFNR Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Professional Standards in Agribusiness (Recommended) Prerequisite: This course is recommended for students in Grades 9-11. Recommended prerequisite: a minimum of one credit from the courses in the Agriculture, Food, and Natural Agribusiness Management and Marketing is designed to provide a foundation to agribusiness To be prepared for careers in agriculture, food, and natural resources, students must acquire technical knowledge in the discipline as well as apply academic skills in mathematics. Students should apply knowledge and skills related to mathematics, including algebra, geometry, and data analysis in the context of agriculture, food, and natural resources. To prepare for success, students are afforded opportunities to reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills related to mathematics in a variety of contexts. K112 Food Technology and Safety Transcript Code: FOODTS Credit: 1 This course examines the food technology industry as it relates to food production, handling, and safety. K113 Food Processing Prerequisite: Food Technology and Safety Transcript Code: FOODPRO Credit: 1 This course focuses on the food processing industry with special emphasis on the handling, processing, and marketing of food products. K114 Wildlife, Fisheries, & Ecology Management Prerequisite: Principles of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources (recommended) Transcript Code: WFECGT Credit: 1 Examines the importance of wildlife and outdoor recreation with emphasis on using wildlife and natural resources. 05/09/2018 58 Students will also examine the management of game and non-game wildlife species, fish, and aqua crops and their ecological needs. Students are able to obtain their Hunter Safety certification during this course if they pass their exam. K117 Floral Design Prerequisite: Principles of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources (recommended) Transcript Code: FLORAL Credit: 1 Exposes students to the basic techniques of floral design. This class is project-based with many large and small projects used to evaluate the progress of the student. There are lots of hands-on activities to involve the students in techniques required in the floral industry. May meet Fine Art credit requirement. K118H Landscape Design & Management Prerequisite: Principles of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources (recommended) Transcript Code: LNDMGT Credit: .5 Focuses on plant identification, selection, care, and maintenance as well as planting, planning and developing a basic landscape. This course focuses on both commercial and residential landscaping. K119 Horticulture Science Prerequisite: Principles of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources (recommended) Transcript Code: HORTISCI Credit: 1 Focuses on the identification, production and care of plants. The students will study propagation, fertilizing, transplanting, and growing various plants. Students will also investigate the various career pathways within the horticulture industry. K121 Agricultural Mechanics & Metal Technologies Prerequisite: Principles of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources (recommended) Transcript Code: AGMECHMT Credit: 1 Develops proficiency in many welding skills. Students will be expected to use the cutting torch and MIG Welders. Welding in several positions, which include flat, horizontal, and vertical. The course develops an understanding of tool operation, electrical wiring, plumbing, carpentry, and metal working techniques. K122 Agricultural Structures Design & Fabrication Prerequisite: Agriculture Mechanics and Metals Transcript Code: AGSDF Credit: 1 Introduce and develop principles of electricity. Geographic Information Systems (GIS), working with concrete, water-management systems, masonry, drywall, and roofing materials. K127 Agricultural Equipment Design & Fabrication Transcript Code: AGEQDF Credit: 1 Students will develop plans for and use welding and hand tools to construct and maintain fences, corrals, and other agricultural enclosures. K1292 Agricultural Equipment Design & Fabrication with Lab Prerequisite: Ag. Mechanics and Metal Technologies (recommended) Grades: 11-12 Transcript Code: AGEQDFLAB Credit: 2 Students will acquire knowledge and skills related to the design and fabrication of agricultural equipment. To prepare for careers in mechanized agriculture and technical systems, students must attain knowledge and skills related to agricultural equipment design and fabrication. To prepare for success, students reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and technical skills in a variety of settings. K1242 Practicum in Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Prerequisite: Advanced courses in Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Transcript Code: PRACAFNR Credit: 2 Provides students the opportunity and support for a paid or non-paid internship in the animal care/agriculture industry. It provides juniors and seniors with a professional internship experience. Students recognize the value of effective work ethics and attitudes and develop communications and problem-solving skills. This course is for those individuals that are enrolled in or have completed Veterinary Medical Application. Students in this course can work on level 1 or level 2 skills and certifications. K128K Extended Practicum in Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources Co-requisite: This course must be taken concurrently with Practicum in Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources Transcript Code: EXPRAFRN Credit: 3 This course is designed to give students supervised practical application of knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experiences such as employment, independent study, internships, assistantships, mentorships, or laboratories. Architecture & Construction K150 Principles of Architecture Transcript Code: PRINARC Credit: 1 Introduces students to the basic knowledge and skills related to the career opportunities and training in the architecture and construction fields. K151 Interior Design I Transcript Code: INTERDS1 Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Principles of Architecture & Construction (Recommended) This technical course addresses the needs of individuals by enhancing the environments in which they live and work. Students will use knowledge and skills related to interior and exterior environments, construction, and furnishings to make wise consumer decisions, increase productivity, and prepare for careers in the interior design field. K1522 Interior Design II Prerequisite: Interior Design Transcript Code: INTERDS2 Credit: 2 Students will use interior design theory, layout & design lines, symbols, and drawings to create original projects which will include the use of colors and furnishings. Projects will include kitchen and bath design as well as commercial and residential design. Furnishings will be emphasized. K1532 Practicum in Interior Design Transcript Code: PRACIDS1 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: Advanced Interior Design The practicum course is a paid or unpaid capstone experience or independent study course for students participating 05/09/2018 59 in a coherent sequence of career and technical education courses in the field of interior design. Instruction may be delivered through laboratory training or through career preparation delivery arrangements. K155 Architectural Design I Prerequisite: Algebra I, Geometry, & Principles of Architecture & Construction (Recommended) Transcript Code: ARCHDSN1 Credit: 1 In Architectural Design, students gain knowledge and skills specific to those needed to enter a career in architecture or prepare a foundation toward a postsecondary degree in architecture, construction science, drafting, interior design and landscape architecture. Architectural Design includes the design, design history, techniques, and tools related to the production of drawings, renderings and scale models for residential architectural purposes. K1562 Architectural Design II Transcript Code: ARCHDSN2 Prerequisites: Architectural Design Credit: 2 In Advanced Architectural Design, students gain advanced knowledge and skills specific to those needed to enter a career in architecture and construction or prepare a foundation toward a postsecondary degree in architecture, construction science, drafting, interior design, and landscape architecture. Advanced Architectural Design includes the advanced knowledge of the design, design history, techniques, and tools related to the production of drawings, renderings, and scaled models for commercial or residential architectural purposes. K1572 Practicum in Architectural Design Transcript Code: PRACADS1 Prerequisite: Architectural Design II Credit: 2 Practicum in Architectural Design is an occupationally specific course designed to provide technical instruction in architectural design. Safety and career opportunities are included in addition to work ethics and architectural design study. K1612 Construction Technology I Transcript Code: CONTECH1 Credit: 2 Students will gain knowledge and skills related to various careers in the construction trade. Student acquire knowledge in areas such as; safety, measuring, laying-out, handtools/powertools, and assembling. Students will participate in hands-on lab activities, such as; blueprint reading, framing, roofing, etc. K1622 Construction Technology II Prerequisite: Construction Technology Transcript Code: CONTECH2 Credit: 2 Students will gain advanced knowledge and skills specific to those needed to enter the constructions workforce. Advanced students will be expected to demonstrate safety practices, craftsmanship, and leadership abilities to first year students. Advanced students will be expected to participate at a high level in hands-on laboratory activities related to construction trades. K1722 Practicum in Construction Management Prerequisite: Advanced courses in Architectural & Construction Transcript Code: PRACCM1 Credit: 2 This course is recommended for students in Grade 12. It is an occupationally-specific course designed to provide classroom technical instruction or on-the-job training experiences. Safety and career opportunities are included in addition to work ethics and job-related study in the classroom. K1772 Practicum in Construction Technology Transcript Code: PRACCT1 Prerequisite: Construction Technology II Credit: 2 This is an occupationally-specific course designed to provide classroom technical instruction or on-the-job training experiences. Safety and career opportunities are included in addition to work ethics and job-related study in the classroom. K174 Principles of Construction Transcript Code: PRINCON Credit: 1 Principles of Architecture and Construction provides an overview to the various fields of architecture, interior design, construction science, and construction technology. Achieving proficiency in decision making and problem solving is an essential skill for career planning and lifelong learning. Students use self-knowledge, educational, and career information to set and achieve realistic career and educational goals. Job-specific, skilled training can be provided through the use of training modules to identify career goals in trade and industry areas. Safety and career opportunities are included, in addition to work ethics and job-related study in the classroom such as communications; problem solving and critical thinking; Information Technology Applications; systems; safety, health, and environmental; leadership and teamwork; ethics and legal responsibilities; employability and career development; technical skills; introduction to hand tools; introduction to power tools; basic rigging; and reading technical drawings. K175K Extended Practicum in Interior Design Transcript Code: EXPRIDS1 Co-requisite: This course must be taken concurrently with Practicum in Interior Design Credit: 3 The practicum course is a paid or unpaid capstone experience or independent study course for students participating in a coherent sequence of career and technical education courses in the field of interior design. Instruction may be delivered through laboratory training or through career preparation delivery arrangements. K176K Extended Practicum in Architectural Design Transcript Code: EXPRADS1 Co-requisite: This course must be taken concurrently with Practicum in Architectural Design Credit: 3 This is an occupationally specific course designed to provide technical instruction in architectural design. Safety and career opportunities are included in addition to work ethics and architectural design study. K178K Extended Practicum in Construction Technology Transcript Code: EXPRCT1 Co-requisite: This course must be taken concurrently with Practicum in Construction Technology Credit: 3 This is an occupationally specific course designed to provide classroom technical instruction or on-the-job training experiences. Safety and career opportunities are included in addition to work ethics and job-related study in the classroom. 05/09/2018 60 Arts, A/V Technology & Communications K200 Principles of Arts, A/V Technology & Communication Transcript Code: PRINAAVTC Credit: 1 Careers in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology and Communications Career Cluster require a creative aptitude, a strong background in computer and technology applications, a strong academic foundation, and a proficiency in oral and written communication. Within this contexts, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the various and multifaceted career opportunities in this cluster and the knowledge, skills, and education requirements for those opportunities. K201 Animation I Prerequisite: Art I Principles of Arts, A/V Technology & Communication (recommended) Transcript Code: ANIMAT1 Credit: 1 Students are introduced to the history, development and direction of the animation industry. The principles of animation are studied and implemented in each successive project as students develop their understanding of various animation techniques and build their skills in each application. Students will use software for 2-dimensional animations (Flash) and 3-dimensional modeling and animation (Anim8or and Maya). Students will design and produce animations and models for various media, from praxinoscopes and zoetropes to Flash movies and Maya models in 3D. K2262 Animation I with Lab Co-requisite: Animation I (cannot be taken as a stand-alone course) Transcript Code: ANILAB1 Credit: 2 Grades: 10-12 Careers in animation span all aspects of motion graphics. Within this context, in addition to developing technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the history and techniques of the animation industry. K202 Animation II Prerequisite: Animation I and Animation I Lab Transcript Code: ANIMAT2 Credit: 1 Within this context, in addition to developing advanced knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Visual Technology, and Communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to create two- and three-dimensional animations. The instruction also assists students seeking careers in the animation industry. K2272 Animation II with Lab Co-requisite: Animation II (cannot be taken as a stand-alone course) Transcript Code: ANILAB2 Credit: 2 Grades: 11-12 Within this context, in addition to developing advanced knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to create two- and three-dimensional animations. The instruction also assists students seeking careers in the animation industry. K2282 Practicum in Animation Prerequisite: Animation II and Animation II Lab Transcript Code: PRACANI1 Credit: 2 Grades: 11-12 Building upon the concepts taught in Animation II and its Co-requisite Animation II Lab, in addition to developing advanced technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to develop an increasing understanding of the industry with a focus on applying pre-production, production, and post-production animation products in a professional environment. Instruction may be delivered through lab-based classroom experiences or career preparation opportunities. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations. K229K Extended Practicum in Animation Co-requisite: Extended Practicum in Animation Transcript Code: EXPRANI1 Credit: 3 Grades: 11-12 This course must be taken concurrently with Practicum in Animation and may not be taken as a stand-alone course. A student may repeat this course once for credit provided that the student is experiencing different aspects of the industry and demonstrating proficiency in additional and more advanced knowledge and skills. K203 Audio/Video Production I Prerequisite: Principles of Arts, A/V, Technology & Communication (Recommended) Transcript Code: AVPROD1 Credit: 1 Students will be expected to develop an understanding of the audio and video industry with a focus on preproduction, production and postproduction activities. Students will demonstrate how to frame and maintain picture composition, analyze the script and storyboard development processes for a successful production, and understand audio techniques, including microphone variances and sound mixing. Students will use character generators, fonts, colors, and principles of composition to create graphic images. Students will also create audio and video technology products for a variety of purposes and audiences. K2302 Audio/Video Production I with Lab Co-requisite: Audio/Video Production I (required) Transcript Code: AVPLAB1 Credit: 2 Grades: 9-12 Within this context, in addition to developing technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the industry with a focus on pre-production, production, and post-production audio and video products. Requiring a lab Co-requisite for the course affords necessary time devoted specifically to the production and post-production process. K204 Audio/Video Production II Prerequisite: Audio Video Production I and AV Production I Lab Transcript Code: AVPROD2 Credit: 1 Building upon the concepts taught in Audio/Video Production, in addition to developing advanced knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to develop an advanced understanding of the industry 05/09/2018 61 with a focus on pre-production, production, and post-production products. This course may be implemented in an audio format or a format with both audio and video. K2312 Audio/Video Production II with Lab Prerequisite: Audio/Video I and AV I Lab; Co-requisite: Audio/Video Production II (required) Transcript Code: AVPLAB2 Credit: 2 Grades: 10-12 Building upon the concepts taught in Audio/Video Production, in addition to developing advanced knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to develop an advanced understanding of the industry with a focus on pre-production, production, and post-production products. Through diverse forms of storytelling and production, students will exercise and develop creativity, intellectual curiosity, and critical-thinking, problem-solving, and collaborative skills. This course may be implemented in an audio format or a format with both audio and video. Requiring a lab Co-requisite for the course affords necessary time devoted specifically to the production and post-production process. K2052 Practicum in Audio/Video Production Prerequisite: Audio/Video Production II and Audio/Video Production II Lab Transcript Code: PRACAVP1 Credit: 2 Building upon the concepts taught in Audio/Video Production II and its Co-requisite Audio/Video Production II Lab, in addition to developing advanced technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Clusters, students will be expected to develop an increasing understanding of the industry with a focus on applying pre-production, production, and post-production audio and video products in a professional environment. This course may be implemented in an advanced audio/video or audio format. Instruction may be delivered through lab-based classroom experience or career preparation opportunities. K232K Extended Practicum in Audio Video Production Prerequisite: Audio Video Production II and AV Production II Lab Co-requisite: Extended Practicum in Audio Video Production Transcript Code: EXPRAVP1 Credit: 3 Grades: 11-12 This course must be taken concurrently with Practicum in Audio/Video Production and may not be taken as a stand-alone course. A student may repeat this course once for credit provided that the student is experiencing different aspects of the industry and demonstrating proficiency in additional and more advanced knowledge and skills. K207 Graphic Design and Illustration I This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Recommended prerequisite: Principles of Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications. Transcript Code: GRAPHDI1 Credit: 1 Careers in graphic design and illustration span all aspects of the advertising and visual communications industries. Within this context, in addition to developing knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the industry with a focus on fundamental elements and principles of visual art and design. K2332 Graphic Design and Illustration I with Lab Co-requisite: Graphic Design and Illustration I (required) Transcript Code: GRDLAB1 Credit: 2 Grades: 10-12 Within this context, in addition to developing knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the industry with a focus on fundamental elements and principles of visual art and design. K208 Graphic Design and Illustration II Prerequisite: Graphic Design and Illustration I and Graphic Design and illustration I Lab Transcript Code: GRAPHDI2 Credit: 1 Advanced Graphic Design and Illustration provides students an opportunity to expand upon the knowledge and skills mastered in Graphic Design and Illustration. Students will create a variety of advanced pictorial renderings and will be given the opportunity to complete Adobe certifications. K2342 Graphic Design and Illustration II with Lab Co-requisite: Graphic Design and Illustration II (required) Transcript Code: GRDLAB2 Credit: 2 Grades: 9-12 Within this context, in addition to developing advanced technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to develop an advanced understanding of the industry with a focus on mastery of content knowledge and skills. K2092 Practicum in Graphic Design and Illustration Prerequisite: Graphic Design and Illustration II and Graphic Design II Lab Transcript Code: PRACGRD1 Credit: 2 Careers in graphic design and illustration span all aspects of the advertising and visual communications industry. Within this context, in addition to developing technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to develop a technical understanding of the industry with a focus on skill proficiency. Instruction may be delivered through lab-based classroom experiences or career preparation opportunities. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations. K235K Extended Practicum in Graphic Design & Illustration Prerequisite: Co-requisite: Practicum in Graphic Design (required) Credit: 3 Transcript Code: EXPRGRD1 Grades: 11-12 This course must be taken concurrently with Practicum in Graphic Design and Illustration and may not be taken as a 05/09/2018 62 stand-alone course. A student may repeat this course once for credit provided that the student is experiencing different aspects of the industry and demonstrating proficiency in additional and more advanced knowledge and skills. K211 Commercial Photography I This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Recommended prerequisite: Graphic Design and Illustration or Art I. Transcript Code: CPHOTO1 Credit: 1 Commercial Photography is a modern, all digital course that teaches the fundamentals of photography as a technical skill and computer based editing and post-processing. It focuses on the creation of quality imagery that meets high artistic and commercial standards. K2362 Commercial Photography I with Lab Co-requisite: Commercial Photography I (required) Transcript Code: CPHLAB1 Credit: 2 Grades: 9-12 Commercial Photography I Careers in commercial photography require skills that span all aspects of the industry from setting up a shot to delivering products in a competitive market. In addition to developing knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the commercial photography industry with a focus on creating quality photographs. K212 Commercial Photography II Prerequisite: Commercial Photography I and Commercial Photography I Lab Co-requisite: Commercial Photography II (required) Credit: 1 Transcript Code: CPHOTO2 Grades: 10-12 Careers in commercial photography span all aspects of the industry from setting up a shot to delivering products in a competitive market. In addition to developing advanced technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to develop an advanced technical understanding of the commercial photography industry with a focus on producing, promoting, and presenting professional quality photographs. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations. K2382 Commercial Photography II with Lab Prerequisite: Commercial Photography I and Commercial Photography I Lab Co-requisite: Commercial Photography II (required) Transcript Code: CPHLAB2 Credit: 2 Grades: 10-12 This course must be taken concurrently with Commercial Photography II and may not be taken as a stand-alone course. K2392 Practicum in Commercial Photography Prerequisite: Commercial Photography I and Commercial Photography I Lab with teacher recommended. Transcript Code: PRACCPH1 Credit: 2 Grades: 10-12 Careers in commercial photography span all aspects of the industry from setting up a shot to delivering products in a competitive market. In addition to developing advanced technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to develop an advanced technical understanding of the commercial photography industry with a focus on producing, promoting, and presenting professional quality photographs. K240K Extended Practicum in Commercial Photography Prerequisite: Commercial Photography I, Commercial Photography I Lab, and Teacher Recommendation Co-requisite: Practicum in Commercial Photography Transcript Code: EXPRCPH1 Credit: 3 Grades: 11-12 This course must be taken concurrently with Practicum in Commercial Photography and may not be taken as a stand-alone course. A student may repeat this course once for credit provided that the student is experiencing different aspects of the industry and demonstrating proficiency in additional and more advanced knowledge and skills. K222 Digital Audio Technology I Prerequisite: none Transcript Code: DATECH1 Credit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Digital Audio Technology I was designed to provide students interested in audio production careers such as audio for radio and television broadcasting, audio for video and film, audio for animation and game design, music production and live sound, and additional opportunities and skill sets. Digital Audio Technology I does not replace Audio Video Production courses but is recommended as a single credit, co-curricular course with an audio production technical emphasis. This course can also be paired with Digital and Interactive Media. Students will be expected to develop an understanding of the audio industry with a technical emphasis on production and critical-listening skills. K223 Digital Audio Technology II Prerequisite: Digital Audio Tech I Transcript Code: DATECH2 Credit: 1 Grades: 10-12 Digital Audio Tech II was designed to provide additional opportunities and skill sets for students interested in audio production careers such as audio for radio and television broadcasting, audio for video and film, audio for animation and game design, and music production and live sound. Digital Audio Technology II [I] does not replace Audio Video Production courses but is recommended as a single credit, co-curricular course with an audio production technical emphasis. This course can also be paired with Digital and Interactive Media (DIM). Students will be expected to develop an understanding of the audio industry with a technical emphasis on production and critical-listening skills. K224 Video Game Design Prerequisite: none. Transcript Code: VIDGD Credit: 1 Grades: 9-12 Video Game Design will allow students to explore one of the largest industries in the global marketplace and the new emerging careers it provides in the field of technology. Students will learn gaming, computerized gaming, evolution of gaming, artistic aspects of perspective, design, animation, technical concepts of collision theory, and programming logic. Students will participate in a simulation of a real video game design team while 05/09/2018 63 developing technical proficiency in constructing an original game design. K213 Fashion Design I Transcript Code: FASHDSN1 Credit: 1 Careers in fashion span all aspects of the textile and apparel industries. Within this context, in addition to developing technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of fashion and the textile and apparel industries. K2412 Fashion Design I with Lab Co-requisite: Fashion Design I (required) Transcript Code: FASLAB1 Credit: 2 Grades: 10-12 Careers in fashion span all aspects of the textile and apparel industries. Within this context, in addition to developing technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the fashion industry with an emphasis on design and construction. K214 Fashion Design II Prerequisite: Fashion Design I and Fashion Design I Lab Transcript Code: FASHDSN2 Credit: 1 Within this context, in addition to developing technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the fashion industry with an emphasis on design and construction. K2422 Fashion Design II with Lab Co-requisite: Fashion Design II (required) Transcript Code: FASLAB2 Credit: 2 Grades: 11-12 Within this context, in addition to developing technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the fashion industry with an emphasis on design and construction. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations. K2152 Practicum in Fashion Design Prerequisites: Fashion Design II and Fashion Design II lab Transcript Code: PRACFAS1 Credit: 2 Within this context, in addition to developing advanced technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to develop an advanced technical understanding of the business aspects of fashion, with emphasis on promotion and retailing. Instruction may be delivered through lab-based classroom experiences or career preparation opportunities. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations. K2162 Practicum in Fashion Design II Transcript Code: PRACFAS2 Prerequisite: Fashion Design II and Fashion Design II Lab Credit: 2 Within this context, students will be expected to develop an advanced technical understanding of the business aspects of fashion, with emphasis on promotion and retailing. Instruction may be delivered through lab-based classroom experiences or career preparation opportunities. K237K Extended Practicum in Fashion Design Prerequisite: Fashion Design II and Fashion Design II Lab Co-requisite: Practicum in Fashion Design Transcript Code: EXPRFAS1 Credit: 3 Grades: 11-12 Within this context, in addition to developing advanced technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to develop an advanced technical understanding of the business aspects of fashion, with emphasis on promotion and retailing. Instruction may be delivered through lab-based classroom experiences or career preparation opportunities. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations. K221H Professional Communication Prerequisite: none. Transcript Code: PROFCOMM Credit: .5 Grades: 9-12 Professional Communications blends written, oral, and graphic communication in a career-based environment. Careers in the global economy require individuals to be creative and have a strong background in computer and technology applications, a strong and solid academic foundation, and a proficiency in professional oral and written communication. Within this context, students will be expected to develop and expand the ability to write, read, edit, speak, listen, apply software applications, manipulate computer graphics, and conduct Internet research. K225UH Professional Communication Prerequisite: none. Transcript Code: PROFCOMM Credit: .5 Grades: 9-12 Professional Communications blends written, oral, and graphic communication in a career-based environment. Careers in the global economy require individuals to be creative and have a strong background in computer and technology applications, a strong and solid academic foundation, and a proficiency in professional oral and written communication. Within this context, students will be expected to develop and expand the ability to write, read, edit, speak, listen, apply software applications, manipulate computer graphics, and conduct Internet research. Providing students with greater rigor and college credit. Business Management & Administration K250 Principles of Business, Marketing & Finance This course is recommended for students in Grades 9-11. Transcript Code: PRINBMF Credit: 1 Finance, students gain knowledge and skills in economies and private 05/09/2018 64 enterprise systems, the impact of global business, the marketing of goods and services, advertising, and product pricing. Students analyze the sales process and financial management principles. This course allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings in business, marketing, and finance. K251H Touch System Data Entry Prerequisite: Grades 9-10 Transcript Code: TSDATAE Credit: .5 Students apply technical skills to address business applications of emerging technologies. Students enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and reasoning skills through use of proper keyboarding technique while developing speed and accuracy. K252 Business Information Management I Prerequisite: Touch Systems Data Entry (recommended); Grades 9-12 Transcript Code: BUSIM1 Credit: 1 Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to strengthen individual performance in the workplace and in society and make successful transition to the workforce and post- secondary education. Students will apply technical skills through word-processing, spreadsheet, database, and electronic presentation software. K253 Business Information Management II Prerequisite: Business Information Management I Transcript Code: BUSIM2 Credit: 1 Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to strengthen individual performance in the workplace and post-secondary education. Students will apply complex technical skills through word-processing and spreadsheet, and developing electronic presentations using multimedia software. K255 Business Law This course is recommended for students in Grades 11-12.: Transcript Code: BUSLAW Credit: 1 Business Law is designed for students to analyze various aspects of the legal environment, including ethics, the judicial system, contracts, personal property, and sales negotiable. K256H Global Business Prerequisite: Principles of Business, Marketing & Finance (Recommended) Transcript Code: GLOBBUS Credit: .5 Global Business is designed for students to analyze global trade theories, international monetary systems, trade policies, politics, and laws relating to global business as well as cultural issues, logistics, and international human resource management. K258H Virtual Business Prerequisite: Touch Systems Data Entry (recommended). Grades 10-12 Transcript Code: VIRTBUS Credit: .5 Virtual Business is designed for students to start a virtual business by creating a web presence, conducting online and off-line marketing, examining contracts appropriate for an online business, and demonstrating project-management skills. Students will also demonstrate bookkeeping skills for a virtual business, maintain business records, and understand legal issues associated with a virtual business. K259 Business Management Grades 10-12 Transcript Code: BUSMGT Credit: 1 Business Management is designed to familiarize students with the concepts related to business management as well as the functions of management, including planning, organizing, staffing, leading, and controlling. Students will also demonstrate interpersonal and project-management skills. K2602 Practicum in Business Management A student may repeat this course once for credit provided that the student is experiencing different aspects of the industry and demonstrating proficiency I addition and more advanced knowledge and skills. Recommended Prerequisite: Touch System Data Entry and Business Management or Business Information Management II Transcript Code: PRACBM Credit: 2 The Practicum is designed to give students supervised practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences occur in a paid or unpaid arrangement and a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience. Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to strengthen individual performance in the workplace and in society and to make a successful transition to the workforce or postsecondary education. Students apply technical skills to address business applications of emerging technologies. Students develop a foundation in the economic, financial, technological, international, social, and ethical aspects of business to become competent consumers, employees, and entrepreneurs. Students enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and reasoning skills and apply them to the business environment. Students incorporate a broad base of knowledge that includes the legal, managerial, marketing, financial, ethical, and international dimensions of business to make appropriate business decisions. K263K Extended Practicum in Business Management Prerequisite: Co-requisite: Practicum in Business Transcript Code: EXPRBM Credit: 3 Grades: 11-12 This course must be taken concurrently with Practicum in Business Management and may not be taken as a stand-alone course. A student may repeat this course once for credit provided that the student is experiencing different aspects of the industry and demonstrating proficiency in additional and more advanced knowledge and skills. Education & Training K275 Principles of Education and Training Transcript Code: PRINEDTR Credit: 1 Principles of Education and Training introduces students to the various careers available within education and training. Students will gain an understanding of the basic knowledge and skills essential to careers within education and training. K276 Human Growth and Development Transcript Code: HUGRDEV Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Principles of Education &Training (Recommended) 05/09/2018 65 This course is a study of human development across the lifespan, from childhood to adulthood. Emphasis is placed on topics such as: research, theory, development, and common social, emotional, physical, and learning stages. K2772 Instructional Practices Prerequisite: Principles of Education &Training (Recommended) Transcript Code: INPRAC Credit: 2 A field-based internship that provides students with background knowledge of child and adolescent development as well as principles of effective teaching practices. Students will work under the joint direction and supervision of a teacher who has expertise in the areas of child development and educational methodology and an exemplary educator who is working in an instruction role in an elementary/middle/high school setting. Students will learn to plan and direct individualized instruction and group activities, prepare instructional materials, develop materials for educational environments, assist with record keeping, and complete other responsibilities of teachers. K2782 Practicum in Education and Training Transcript Code: PRACEDT1 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: Instructional Practices in Education and Training. This course is a field-based internship that provides students background knowledge of child and adolescent development principles as well as principles of effective teaching and training practices. Students in the course work under the joint direction and supervision of both a teacher with knowledge of early childhood education and exemplary educators in direct instructional roles with elementary-, middle school-, and high school-aged students. Students learn to plan and direct individualized instruction and group activities, prepare instructional materials, assist with record keeping, make physical arrangements, and complete other responsibilities of classroom teachers, trainers, paraprofessionals, or other educational personnel. K280K Extended Practicum in Education and Training Transcript Code: EXPREDT1 Credit: 3 Prerequisite: This class is a co-requisite with Practicum in Education and Training and may not be taken alone. This is a field based internship that provides knowledge of child and adolescent development principles of effective teaching and training practices. This course is an extension of Practicum in Education and Training. Finance K250 Principles of Business, Marketing & Finance Transcript Code: PRINBMF Credit: 1 Students are introduced to knowledge and skills of economics and private enterprise systems, impact of global business, marketing of goods and services, advertising, and product pricing. Students analyze the sales process and financial management principles. K300 Money Matters Prerequisite: Principles of Business, Marketing & Finance (Recommended) Transcript Code: MONEYM Credit: 1 Students will investigate global economics in the free enterprise system and its impact on consumers and businesses. Students apply critical thinking skills to analyze financial options based on current and projected economic factors. Students will gain knowledge and skills necessary to set long-term goals based on these options. Students will determine methods of achieving long-term financial goals through investment, tax planning, asset allocation, risk management, retirement planning, and estate planning. K301H Banking and Financial Services Prerequisite: Principles of Business, Marketing and Finance (Recommended) Transcript Code: BANKFIN Credit: .5 Students develop knowledge and skills in the economical, financial, technological, international, social, and ethical aspects of banking to become competent consumers, employees, and entrepreneurs. Students incorporate a broad base of knowledge that includes the operations, sales, and management of banking institutions to gain a complete understanding of how banks function within society. K304 Accounting I Prerequisite: Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance (recommended) Transcript Code: ACCOUNT1 Credit: 1 Students investigate the field of accounting, including how it is impacted by industry standards as well as economic, financial, technological, international, social, legal, and ethical factors. Students reflect on this knowledge as they engage in the process of recording, classifying, summarizing, analyzing, and communicating accounting information. Students formulate and interpret financial information for use in management decision making. K305 Accounting II Prerequisite: Accounting I Transcript Code: ACCOUNT2 Credit: 1 Students continue the investigation of the field of accounting, including how it is impacted by industry standards as well as economic, financial, technological, international, social, legal, and ethical factors. Students reflect on this knowledge as they engage in various managerial and cost accounting activities. Students formulate and interpret financial information for use in management decision making. K307 Statistics & Business Decision Making Prerequisite: Accounting I and Algebra II (Recommended) Transcript Code: STATBDM Credit: 1 Students will use a variety of graphical and numerical techniques to analyze patterns and departures from patterns to identify and manage risk that could impact an organization. Students will use probability as a tool for anticipating and forecasting data within business models to make decisions. Students will determine the appropriateness of methods used to collect data to ensure conclusions are valid. Health Science K3482 PIHS Pharmacy Tech Prerequisite: Health & Science Biology (recommended) Grades 11-12 Transcript Code: PRACHLS1 Credit: 2 Pharmacy Tech is designed to give students practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. 05/09/2018 66 Experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experiences. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a health science career through further education and employment. Professional integrity in the health science industry is dependent on acceptance of ethical and legal responsibilities. Students are expected to employ their ethical and legal responsibilities and limitations and understand the implications of their actions. K365K Extended Practicum in Health Science: Pharmacy Tech Prerequisite: Principles of Health Science, Health Science Theory, and Biology: Co-requisite: Practicum in Health Science (required) Transcript Code: EXPRHLS1 Credit: 3 Grades: 11-12 The Extended Practicum in Health Science course is designed to give students practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience. K3492 PIHS II Pharmacy Tech Prerequisite: Pharmacy Tech I Transcript Code: PRACHLS2 Credit: 2 Pharmacy Tech II is designed to give students practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. Experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experiences. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a health science career through further education and employment. K3532 PIHS - Clinicals Prerequisites: Health Science & Biology Transcript Code: PRACHLS1 Credit: 2 The Practicum is designed to give students practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience. Participation may require personal transportation, background check, and possible drug testing. K3542 PIHS II - Clinicals Transcript Code: PRACHLS2 Prerequisite: PHIS I Credit: 2 Clinicals are designed to give students practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience. Students should identify the employment opportunities, technology, and safety requirements of each system. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a health science career through further education and employment. Professional integrity in the health science industry is dependent on acceptance of ethical and legal responsibilities. Students are expected to employ their ethical and legal responsibilities and limitations and understand the implications of their actions. K3622 PIHS - CNA & Phlebotomy Transcript Code: PRACHLS1 Prerequisite: 18 years of age by October 15 application. Credit: 2 This preparation course is designed for entry level nursing assistants to achieve a level of knowledge, skills and abilities essential for providing basic care to residents of long term care facilities. Topics include resident s right, communication, safety, observation, reporting and assisting residents in maintaining basic comfort and safety. Emphasis is placed on effective interaction with members of the health care team. Some clinical time is arranged outside of the classroom. It is the student s responsibility to pay for certification exams, personal liability insurance, supplies, and uniform. K368K Extended PIHS CNA & Phlebotomy Prerequisite: Corequisite with PIHS. This course must be taken concurrently with PIHS and may not be taken as a stand- alone course. 18 years of age by October 15 application. Transcript Code: EXPRHLS1 Credit: 3 This course is designed for entry level nursing assistants to achieve a level of knowledge, skills and abilities essential for providing basic care to residents of long term care facilities. Topics include resident s right, communication, safety, observation, reporting and assisting residents in maintaining basic comfort and safety. Emphasis is placed on effective interaction with members of the health care team. Some clinical time is arranged outside of the classroom. It is the student s responsibility to pay for certification exams, personal liability insurance, supplies and uniform. K3632 PIHS II CNA & Phlebotomy Prerequisite: 18 years of age by October 15 application. Transcript Code: PRACHLS2 Credit: 2 Clinicals are designed to give students practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience. Students should identify the employment opportunities, technology, and safety requirements of each system. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a health science career through further education and employment. Professional integrity in the health science industry is dependent on acceptance of ethical and legal responsibilities. Students are expected to employ their ethical and legal responsibilities and limitations and understand the implications of their actions. Phlebotomy is a course teaching common phlebotomy practices for adults and children. Students learn how to safely and effectively draw blood using venipuncture and capillary puncture methods for adults and children, plus finger sticks or heel sticks for young children and infants. Non-blood specimen collection practices are part of the curriculum. K367K Extended PIHS Clinicals Prerequisite: Corequisite with PIHS. This course must be taken concurrently with PIHS and may not be taken as a stand-alone course. Transcript Code: EXPRHLS1 Credit: 3 Clinicals are designed to give students practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience. Students should identify the employment opportunities, technology, and safety requirements of each system. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a health science career through further education and employment. Professional integrity in the health science industry is dependent on acceptance of ethical and legal responsibilities. Students are expected to employ their ethical and legal 05/09/2018 67 responsibilities and limitations and understand the implications of their actions. K350 Principles of Health Science Prerequisite: Biology (Concurrent) Transcript Code: PRINHLSC Credit: 1 The Principles of Health Science provides an overview of the therapeutic, diagnostic, health informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development systems of the health care industry. K351 Medical Terminology Transcript Code: MEDTERM Credit: 1 The Medical Terminology course is designed to introduce students to the structure of medical terms, including prefixes, suffixes, word roots, singular and plural forms, and medical abbreviations. The course allows students to achieve comprehension of medical vocabulary appropriate to medical procedures, human anatomy and physiology, and pathophysiology. K3511U Medical Terminology Dual Credit Transcript Code: MEDTERM Credit: 1 The Medical Terminology course is designed to introduce students to the structure of medical terms, including prefixes, suffixes, word roots, singular and plural forms, and medical abbreviations. The course allows students to achieve comprehension of medical vocabulary appropriate to medical procedures, human anatomy and physiology, and pathophysiology. Providing students with a medical terminology class with greater rigor and college credit. K352 Health Science Theory Prerequisites: Biology, Principles of Health Science Transcript Code: HLTHSCI Credit: 1 The Health Science Theory course is designed to provide for the development of advanced knowledge and skills related to a wide variety of health careers. Students will employ hands-on experiences for continued knowledge and skill development. K3642 Health Science Theory with Clinical Prerequisite: Biology and Principles of Health Science: Co-requisite: Health Science Theory Transcript Code: HLSCLIN Credit: 2 Grades: 10-12 The Health Science Clinical course is designed to provide for the development of advanced knowledge and skills related to a wide variety of health careers. Students will employ hands-on experiences for continued knowledge and skill development. To pursue a career in the health science industry, students should recognize, learn to reason, think critically, make decisions, solve problems, and communicate effectively. Students should recognize that quality health care depends on the ability to work well with others. K355 Anatomy & Physiology Honors Prerequisites: Biology and a second Science credit Transcript Code: ANATPHYS Credit: 1 The Anatomy and Physiology course is designed for students to conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students in Anatomy and Physiology will study a variety of topics, including the structure and function of the human body and the interaction of body systems for maintaining homeostasis. K355 Anatomy & Physiology Dual Credit Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, and Lone College Montgomery readiness requirements. Transcript Code: ANATPHYS Credit: 1 This course combines Anatomy and Physiology with Lone Star College Montgomery course 2401. The course is a study of the structure and function of the human body. While all body systems will be covered, emphasis will be given to the study of cells and tissues and physiological interrelationships of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Students conduct laboratory investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. K356 Medical Microbiology Honors Prerequisite: Biology, Chemistry, and a course from the Health Science Career Cluster Transcript Code: MICRO Credit: 1 The Medical Microbiology course is designed to explore the microbial world, studying topics such as pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms, laboratory procedures, identifying microorganisms, drug resistant organisms, and emerging diseases. K357 Pathophysiology Honors Prerequisite: Biology, Chemistry, and a course from the Health Science Career Cluster Grades: 11-12 Transcript Code: PATHO Credit: 1 The Pathophysiology course is designed for students to conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students in Pathophysiology will study disease processes and how humans are affected. Emphasis is placed on prevention and treatment of disease. Students will differentiate between normal and abnormal physiology. K366 Pharmacology Prerequisite: Biology, Chemistry, and a course from the Health Science Cluster Transcript Code: PHARMC Credit: 1 Grades: 11-12 The Pharmacology course is designed to study how natural and synthetic chemical agents such as drugs affect biological systems. Knowledge of the properties of therapeutic agents is vital in providing quality health care. It is an ever-changing, growing body of information that continually demands greater amounts of time and education from health care workers. Hospitality & Tourism K375 Principles of Hospitality and Tourism Transcript Code: PRINHOSP Credit: 1 This course provides an introduction to the hospitality and tourism industry. Topics include lodging, travel and tourism, recreation, amusements, attractions, resorts, and restaurants and food beverage service. 05/09/2018 68 K376 Hotel Management Transcript Code: HOTELMGT Prerequisite: Principles of Hospitality and Tourism Credit: 1 This course is designed to provide the students with a general understanding of the dynamics of the lodging industry, and specifically the operations and management of today s modern hotels. K3822 Hospitality Services Transcript Code: HOSPSRVS Prerequisite: Hotel Management Credit: 2 In this course, students will be introduced to the major concepts, issues, and theories of tourism and hospitality as an economic sector and topic of academic study. The course will cover a broad range of topics related to the travel experience, from business development to the linkages between tourism as an industry and the impacts it has on communities and places. Students will also be introduced to key elements of the hospitality service industry and opportunities for employment within this industry. The course will also introduce concepts such as sustainability, planning, and ethical responsibility. K3832 Practicum in Hospitality Services Transcript Code: PRACHOS1 Prerequisite: Hospitality Services Credit: 2 This course is a unique practicum that provides occupationally-specific opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with actual business and industry career experiences. K386K Extended Practicum in Hospitality Services Transcript Code: EXPRHOS1 Prerequisite: Must be taken concurrently with Practicum in Hospitality Services Credit: 3 This course is a unique practicum that provides occupationally-specific opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with actual business and industry career experiences. Must be taken concurrently with Practicum in Hospitality Services. K378 Travel and Tourism Management Transcript Code: TRTORMGT Credit: 1 This course incorporates management principles and procedures of the travel and tourism industry as well as destination geography, airlines, international travel, cruising, travel by rail, lodging, recreation, amusements, attractions, and resorts. Employment qualifications and opportunities are also included in this course. K377 Introduction to Culinary Arts Transcript Code: INCULART Credit: 1 This course will emphasize the principles of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling the management of a variety of food service operations. Students will gain insight into the operation of a well-run restaurant. K3792 Culinary Arts Prerequisite: Lifetime Nutrition & Wellness or Restaurant Management (Recommended) Transcript Code: CULARTS Credit: 2 This laboratory-based course begins with the fundamentals and principles of the art of food preparation and includes management and production skills and techniques. Students can pursue a national sanitation certification and other appropriate industry certifications. The knowledge and skills required for careers in the restaurant, food, and beverage industry are practiced as food is prepared. K3802 Practicum in Culinary Arts Prerequisite: Culinary Arts Transcript Code: PRACCUL1 Credit: 2 This course is a unique practicum that provides occupationally-specific opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with actual business and industry career experiences. Students will be given scholarship opportunities through food service competitions and will be able to develop and sharpen job readiness skills through training in ethics, leadership, and hands-on experiences. K385 Food Science Transcript Code: FOODSCI Prerequisite: Biology, Chemistry, and one additional science course Credit: 1 Food Science is the study of the nature of foods, the causes of deterioration, the principles underlying food processing, and the improvement of foods for the consuming public. Some of the topics to be covered include the principles of microbiology and food safety practices, the role of fermentation in foods, the reaction of leavening agents in baked products, the role of food additives, and the food preservation process. In Food Science students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Human Services K400 Principles of Human Services Transcript Code: PRINHUSR Credit: 1 This laboratory course will enable students to investigate careers in the human services career cluster, including counseling and mental health, early childhood development, family and community, and personal care services. Each student is expected to complete the knowledge and skills essential for success in high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand human services careers. K401H Dollars and Sense Transcript Code: DOLLARSE Credit: .5 This course focuses on consumer practices and responsibilities, the money management process, decision-making sills, the impact of technology on financial management, and preparation for human services careers. K402H Interpersonal Studies Transcript Code: INTERSTU Credit: .5 This course examines how the relationships between individuals and among family members significantly affect the quality of life. Students use knowledge and skills in family studies and human development to enhance personal development, foster quality relationships, promote wellness of family members, manage multiple adult roles, and pursue careers related to counseling and mental health services. K403H Lifetime Nutrition & Wellness Transcript Code: LNURTWEL Credit: .5 05/09/2018 69 This laboratory course allows students to use principles of lifetime wellness and nutrition to help them make informed choices that promote wellness as well as pursue careers related to hospitality, human services, and health sciences. Laboratory experiences will focus on the integration of nutrition and wellness knowledge with basic food preparation and management skills. K405I Child Development Transcript Code: CHILDDEV Credit: 1 This course addresses knowledge and skills related to child growth and development from prenatal through school-age children. Students will become equipped with child development knowledge that can be used to promote the well-being and healthy development of children and to investigate careers related to the care and education of children. K4062 Child Guidance Transcript Code: CHILDGUI Credit: 2 Child Guidance provides students classroom instruction and laboratory experience to prepare for a career related to the care, guidance and education of preschool children. The Pre-Employment Laboratory Child Care Program allows student the opportunity to implement their lesson plans in an Early Education classroom located on the campus. Students learn to plan nutritious meals, follow safety procedures, determine guidance techniques and create educationally-sound activities. In addition, students will explore careers related to Early Childhood education. Completion of the program will prepare students for higher education courses and employment in entry-level childcare programs. K4082 Practicum in Human Services I Prerequisite: Child Guidance (recommended) Transcript Code: PRACHUS1 Credit: 2 This practicum provides occupationally specific training and focuses on the development of careers in early childhood. Practicum in Human Services expands the skills and knowledge gained in Child Guidance to a managerial view of a career in the child care field. Instruction will be delivered in a laboratory setting at the campus' Pre-Employment Laboratory Child Care Program. Students will learn business tools and will collaborate within a teamwork effort to efficiently provide a professional environment in an Early Childhood setting. Productivity will culminate with a professional portfolio that will include a resume and work samples. The portfolios will benefit students seeking employment and higher education in an Early Childhood setting. K4092 Practicum in Human Services II Prerequisites: Practicum in Human Services I Transcript Code: PRACHUS2 Credit: 2 This practicum provides occupationally specific training and focuses on the development of careers in the areas of consumer services, early childhood development and services, counseling, nutrition and wellness, hospitality and food services, fashion and interior design, and family and community services. Content is designed to meet the occupational preparation needs and interests of students by placing them in a paid employment setting. K422K Extended Practicum in Human Services Prerequisites: Must be taken concurrently with Practicum in Human Services I Transcript Code: EXPRHUS1 Credit: 3 This course is a unique practicum that provides occupationally-specific opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with actual business and industry career experiences. Must be taken concurrently with Practicum in Hospitality Services. K410 Introduction to Cosmetology Transcript Code: INTCOSMO Credit: 1 In Introduction to Cosmetology, students explore careers in the cosmetology industry. To prepare for success, students must have academic and technical knowledge and skills relative to the industry. Students may begin to earn hours toward state licensing requirements. K4112 Cosmetology I Transcript Code: COSMET1 Credit: 2 Provides students with the basic specific classroom training needed to achieve their Texas Cosmetology License. Students will also be able to work on outside clientele for hands-on training. Students will be expected to purchase their beginners training kit during the first week of school. Students will be required to have completed 500 clocked hours before advancing to Cosmetology II. K4122 Cosmetology II Prerequisite: Cosmetology I Transcript Code: COSMET2 Credit: 2 Upon completion of their senior year and the required 1500 hours total, students will have received classroom training needed to prepare them for their Cosmetologist Exam from the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulations. Students will also be able to work on outside clientele for hands-on training. K423K Cosmetology II with Lab Prerequisite: Cosmetology I Transcript Code: COSLAB2 Credit: 3 Upon completion of their senior year and the required 1500 hours total, students will have received classroom training needed to prepare them for their Cosmetologist Exam from the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulations. Students will also be able to work on outside clientele for hands on training and provided extra time within the school day. K420 Principles of Cosmetology Design & Color Theory Prerequisite: Cosmetology I Recommended: Grade 12 currently enrolled in Cosmetology II program. Transcript Code: PRICOSMO Credit: 1 This course is to be taken concurrently with the Cosmetology II course. Students will expand upon knowledge and skills regarding various cosmetology design elements such as form, lines, texture, structure, and illusion, and depth as they relate to the art of cosmetology. K421 Microbiology & Safety for Cosmetology Careers Prerequisite: Cosmetology I Transcript Code: MICROS Credit: 1 Students who enroll in Microbiology and Safety for Cosmetology Careers will receive instruction in the microbial world, studying topics such as pathogenic and non-pathogenic 05/09/2018 70 microorganisms, identification of microorganisms, drug resistant organisms, and emerging diseases. Information Technology K425 Principles of Information Technology Transcript Code: PRINIT Credit: 1 Students develop computer literacy skills to adapt to emerging technologies used in the global marketplace. Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to prepare for a rapidly evolving workplace environment. Students enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and reasoning skills and apply them to the information technology environment. K426 Computer Maintenance Transcript Code: COMPMTN Credit: 1 Students acquire principles of computer maintenance, including electrical and electronic theory, computer hardware principles, and broad level components related to the installation, diagnosis, service, and repair of computer systems. K431 Digital Media Transcript Code: DIMEDIA Credit: 1 Through the study of digital and interactive media and its application in information technology, students will analyze and assess current and emerging technologies, while designing and creating multimedia projects that address customer needs and resolve a problem. Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to prepare for a rapidly evolving workplace environment. The knowledge and skills acquired and practiced will enable students to successfully perform and interact in a technology-driven society. Students enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and critical thinking and apply them to the information technology environment. K432 Web Technologies Prerequisite: Principles of Information Technology Transcript Code: WEBTECH Credit: 1 Through the study of web technologies and design, students learn to make informed decisions and apply the decisions to the field of information technology. Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to prepare for a rapidly evolving workplace environment. The knowledge and skills acquired and practiced will enable students to successfully perform and interact in a technology-driven society. Students enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and critical thinking and apply them to the information technology environment. K437 Internetworking I Transcript Code: INTNET1 Credit: 1-2 K438 Internetworking II Transcript Code: INTNET2 Credit: 1-3 This is an advanced technology course designed to develop networking skills which includes understanding the concepts of networking and the technology industry standards. This is a hands-on course where students will learn how to design and construct LANs (local area networks) and WANs (wide area networks) using equipment such as RJ45 jacks, UTP cabling, cable, cable testers, crimpers, patch cords, patch panels, transceivers, hubs, switches, and routers. This course prepares students for the CCNA certification test. Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security K450 Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Transcript Code: PRINLPCS Credit: 1 Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security introduces students to professions in law enforcement, protective services, corrections, firefighting, and emergency management services. Students will examine the roles and responsibilities of police, courts corrections, private security, and protective agencies of fire and emergency services. The course provides students with an overview of the skills necessary for careers in law enforcement, fire service, protective services, and corrections. K451 Law Enforcement I Prerequisite: Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Transcript Code: LAWENF1 Credit: 1 Law Enforcement I is an overview of the history, organization, and functions of local, state, and federal law enforcement. Students will gain understanding of the role of constitutional law, at local, state, and federal levels, the United States legal system, criminal law, law enforcement terminology, and the classification and elements of crime. K452 Law Enforcement II Prerequisite: Law Enforcement I Transcript Code: LAWENF2 Credit: 1 Law Enforcement II provides the knowledge and skills necessary to prepare for a career in law enforcement. Students will understand the ethical and legal responsibilities, patrol procedures, first responder roles, telecommunications, emergency equipment, and courtroom testimony. K466 Criminal Investigations Prerequisite: Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Transcript Code: CRINVEST Credit: 1 Criminal Investigations is a course that introduces students to the profession of criminal investigations. Students will understand basic functions of criminal investigations, procedures, and will learn how to investigate or follow-up during investigations. Students will learn terminology and investigative procedures related to criminal investigation, crime scene processing, evidence collection, fingerprinting, and courtroom presentation. Through case students and simulated crime scenes, students will collect and analyze evidence such as fingerprint analysis, bodily fluids, hairs, fibers, shoe and tire impressions, bite marks, drugs, tool marks, firearms, ammunition, blood spatter, digital evidence, and other types of evidence. K453 Forensic Science Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Law Enforcement I (Recommended) Transcript Code: FORENSCI Credit: 1 Forensic Science uses a structured and scientific approach to the investigation of crimes such as assault, abuse and neglect, domestic violence, accidental death, and homicide. Students will learn terminology and investigative procedures related to crime scenes, questioning and interviewing, and scientific procedures used to solve criminal acts. Using scientific methods, students will collect and analyze evidence through case studies and simulated crime scenes. Students will conduct fingerprint, ballistics, and blood spatter analysis. Students will gain 05/09/2018 71 knowledge and understanding of forensic science by studying the history, legal aspects, and career opportunities in the field of forensics. K454 Court Systems & Practices Prerequisite: Law Enforcement I Transcript Code: COURTSP Credit: 1 Court Systems and Practices is an overview of the federal and state court systems. The course identifies the roles of judicial officers and the trial processes from pretrial to sentencing and examines the types and rules of evidence. Emphasis is placed on constitutional laws for criminal procedures such as search and seizure, stop and frisk, and interrogation. K4642 Practicum in Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Prerequisite: Law Enforcement I Transcript Code: PRACLPS1 Credit: 2 Practicum in Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security is a paid or unpaid capstone experience for students participating in a coherent sequence of career and technical education courses in the Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Career Cluster. The practicum course is designed to give students supervised practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills in law, public safety, corrections, and security. K465K Extended Practicum in Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Co-requisite: Practicum in Law, Public Safety, corrections, and Security. Transcript Code: EXPRLPS1 Credit: 3 Practicum in Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security is a paid or unpaid capstone experience for students participating in a coherent sequence of career and technical education courses in the Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Career Cluster. This course must be taken concurrently with Practicum in Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security and may not be taken as a stand-alone course. The practicum course is designed to give students supervised practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills in law, public safety, corrections, and security. Manufacturing K475 Principles of Manufacturing Prerequisite: Algebra I or Geometry Grades 9-12 Transcript Code: PRINMAN Credit: 1 In Principles of Manufacturing, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems and how those knowledge and skills are applied to manufacturing. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of principles of manufacturing, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of manufacturing production technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of manufacturing technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings in a manufacturing setting. In addition to general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in manufacturing and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers. K474 Introduction to Welding Prerequisite: Principles of Manufacturing Transcript Code: INTRWELD Credit: 1 Introduction to Welding is a course in which students learn basic skills and knowledge related to cutting and welding applications. Course content includes safe practices, career research, and basic arc welding and thermal cutting skills. K4762 Welding I Prerequisite: Algebra I (recommended) Transcript Code: WELD1 Credit: 2 Welding provides the knowledge, skills, and technologies required for employment in metal technology systems. Students develop knowledge and skills related to this system and apply them to personal career development. This course supports integration of academic and technical knowledge and skills. Students will reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge. K4772 Welding II Transcript Code: WELD2 Credit: 2 Welding II builds on the knowledge and skills developed in Welding I. Students will develop advanced welding concepts and skills as they relate to personal and career development. K4832 Practicum in Manufacturing Transcript Code: PRACMAN1 Credit: 2 The Practicum in Manufacturing course is designed to give students supervised practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience. The practicum course is a paid or unpaid capstone experience for students participating in a coherent sequence of career and technical education courses in the Manufacturing Career Cluster. Marketing K250 Principles of Business, Marketing & Finance Transcript Code: PRINBMF Credit: 1 Students are introduced to knowledge and skills of economics and private enterprise systems, impact of global business, marketing of goods and services, advertising, and product pricing. Students analyze the sales process and financial management principles. K500H Advertising Prerequisite: Principles of Business, Marketing & Finance (Recommended) Transcript Code: ADVERTIS Credit: .5 Advertising and Sales Promotion is a comprehensive introduction to the principles and practices of advertising. Students will gain knowledge of techniques used in current advertising, including print, broadcast, and digital media. The course explores the social, ethical, and legal issues of advertising, historical influences, strategies, and media decision processes as well as integrated marketing communications. The course provides an overview of how communication tools can be used to reach target audiences and increase consumer knowledge. 05/09/2018 72 K501H Fashion Marketing Prerequisite: Principles of Business, Marketing & Finance (Recommended) Transcript Code: FASHMKTG Credit: .5 Fashion Marketing is designed to provide students with knowledge of various business functions in the fashion industry. Students in Fashion Marketing will gain a working knowledge of promotion, textiles, merchandising, mathematics, selling, visual merchandising, and career opportunities. K502 Entrepreneurship Prerequisite: Principles of Business, Marketing & Finance (Recommended) Transcript Code: ENTREP Credit: 1 Students will gain the knowledge and skills needed to become an entrepreneur. Students will learn the principles necessary to begin and operate a business. The primary focus of the course is to help students understand the process of analyzing a business opportunity, preparing a business plan, determining feasibility of an idea using research, and developing a plan to organize and promote the business and its products and services. In addition, students understand the capital required, the return on investment desired, and the potential for profit. K508H Social Media Marketing Prerequisite: Principles of Business, Marketing & Finance (Recommended) Transcript Code: SMEDMKTG Credit: .5 Social Media Marketing is designed to look at the rise of social media and how marketers are integrating social media tools in their overall marketing strategy. The course will investigate how the marketing community measures success in the new world of social media. Students will manage a successful social media presence for an organization, understand techniques for gaining customer and consumer buy-in to achieve marketing goals, and properly select social media platforms to engage consumers and monitor and measure the results of these efforts. K504H Sports & Entertainment Marketing Prerequisite: Principles of Business, Marketing & Finance (Recommended) or any marketing course. Transcript Code: SMEDMKTG Credit: .5 This course will provide students with a thorough understanding of the marketing concepts and theories that apply to sports and sporting events and entertainment. The areas this course will cover include basic marketing, target marketing and segmentation, sponsorship, event marketing, promotions, sponsorship proposals, and implementation of sports and entertainment marketing plans. This course will also provide students an opportunity to develop promotional plans, sponsorship proposals, endorsement contracts, sports and entertainment marketing plans, and evaluation and management techniques. K5052 Advanced Marketing Prerequisite: Principles of Business, Marketing & Finance, and required employment averaging 10-15 hours per week Transcript Code: ADVMKTG Credit: 2 Marketing is a series of dynamic activities that focus on the customer to generate a profitable exchange. Students gain knowledge and skills that help them to be proficient in one or more of the marketing functional areas associated with distribution, financing, marketing information management, pricing, product planning, promotion, purchasing, risk management, and selling skills. Students integrate skills from academic subjects, information technology, interpersonal communication, and management training to make responsible decisions. This course may include paid or unpaid career preparation experience. K5062 Practicum in Marketing Prerequisites: Marketing Dynamics and required employment averaging 10-15 hours per week Transcript Code: PRACMTK1 Credit: 2 Through course required employment, students gain knowledge and skills that help them become proficient in one or more of the marketing functional areas. Students will illustrate appropriate management and research skills to create the marketing mix. This course covers technology, communication, and customer-service skills. The practicum is designed to give students supervised practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience. The practicum course is a paid or unpaid experience for students participating in a coherent sequence of career and technical education courses in marketing education. K509K Extended Practicum in Marketing Prerequisites: This course is a co-requisite with Practicum in Marketing and cannot be taken alone. Transcript Code: EXPRMKT1 Credit: 3 This course is designed to give students supervised practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. The practicum course is a paid or unpaid experience for students participating in a coherent sequence of marketing courses. This course is an extension of Practicum in Marketing. K077 Project-Based Research Transcript Code: PROBS1 Credit: 1 Project-Based Research is a course for DECA students to research a real-world problem. Students are matched with a mentor from the business or professional community to develop an original project on a topic related to career interests. Students use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, compile findings, and present their findings to an audience that includes experts in the field. Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics K525 Principles of Applied Engineering Transcript Code: PRAPPENG Credit: 1 Concepts of Engineering and Technology provide an overview of the various fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics through the use of modular laboratory. Students will use a variety of computer hardware and software applications to complete assignments and projects. Students will have worked in design teams to develop a product or system. Students will use multiple software applications to prepare and present course assignments, relative to communication, construction, energy, aerospace, and more. 05/09/2018 73 K527 Biotechnology I Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry Transcript Code: BIOTECH1 Credit: 1 Students will apply advanced academic knowledge and skills to the emerging fields of biotechnology such as agricultural, medical, regulatory, and forensics. Students will have the opportunity to use sophisticated laboratory equipment, perform statistical analysis, and practice quality-control techniques. K528 Engineering Design & Presentation I Prerequisites: Algebra I recommended Transcript Code: ENGDSPR1 Credit: 1 Students enrolled in this course will demonstrate knowledge and skill of the process of design as it applies to engineering fields using software applications and tools necessary to produce and present working drawings and prototypes. Students will use computer hardware and software applications to complete assignments and projects. Through implementation of the design process, students will transfer advanced academic skills to component designs. Additionally, students explore career opportunities in engineering, technology, and drafting and what is required to gain and maintain employment in these areas. K5292 Engineering Design & Presentation II Prerequisite: Engineering Design & Presentation Transcript Code: ENGDSPR2 Credit: 2 This course will provide students the opportunity to master computer software applications in a variety of engineering and technical fields. This course further develops the process of engineering thought and application of the design process. Students apply concepts of engineering and use a variety of technologies to develop prototypes to solve specific problems. K531 AC/DC Electronics Transcript Code: ACDCELEC Credit: 1 Students enrolled in this course will demonstrate knowledge and applications of circuits, electronic measurement, and electronic implementation. Through use of the design process, students will transfer academic skills to component designs in a project-based environment. Students will use a variety of computer hardware and software applications to complete assignments and projects. Additionally, students explore career opportunities, employer expectations, and educational needs in the electronics industry. K533 Robotics I Prerequisites: Concepts of Engineering and Technology and Electronics Grades 11-12 Transcript Code: ROBOTIC1 Credit: 1 Students enrolled in this course will demonstrate knowledge and skills necessary for the robotic and automation industry. Through implementation of the design process, students will transfer advanced academic skills to component designs in a project-based environment. Students will build prototypes or use simulation software to test their designs. Additionally, students explore career opportunities, employer expectations, and educational needs in the robotic and automation industry. K555 Robotics II Prerequisite: Robotics I Transcript Code: ROBOTIC2 Credit: 1 Grades 11-12 Students will explore artificial intelligence and programming in the robotic and automation industry. Through implementation of the design process, students will transfer academic skills to component designs in a project-based environment. Students will build prototypes and use software to test their designs. K534 Principles of Technology Prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry, and Algebra I Transcript Code: PRINTECH Credit: 1 Students will conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Various systems will be described in terms of space, time, energy, and matter. Students will study a variety of topics that include laws of motion, conservation of energy, momentum, electricity, magnetism, thermodynamics, and behavior of waves. K535 Scientific Research and Design Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Biology Transcript Code: SCIRD Credit: 1 The purpose of this class is to introduce students to scientific research and to prepare them for their Individual Experimental Research Project (IERP). Students will learn problem identification, methods of library and computer searching, research methodologies, and data analysis and presentation. Students will also develop appropriate skills in computer applications, time management, and technical writing. Verbal and graphic communication opportunities will be provided. The concept of the research team will be explored, and importance of peer review and research ethics will be stressed. K536 Scientific Research and Design II Honors Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry Transcript Code: SCIRD2 Credit: 1 The first semester of this course will introduce students to the fundamentals of electronic circuits. Students will build analog and digital direct-current circuits using breadboards. There will also be limited exposure to programmable logic chips. Each student will design and prototype a battery-powered device. During the spring, the students will apply the principles learned in the fall to the design and construction of robots. They will explore the ways robots interact with their surroundings by testing a variety of sensors and interfacing them with programmable logic chips. Some simple programming experience is desirable. K5382 Practicum in STEM Transcript Code: PRCSTEM1 Credit: 2 Careers in Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics (STEM) are challenging and innovative. Students who pursue one of these career fields will be involved in planning, managing, and providing scientific research and professional and technical services ( , physical science, social science, engineering) including laboratory and testing services, and research and development services. The STEM courses are productive, comprehensive and experienced-base that allow students to investigate and experience the means by which humans meet their needs and wants, to solve problems, 05/09/2018 74 and extend their competencies. CTE is concerned with the knowledge and skills to develop, produce, and use products or services and how to measure the impacts these activities have on humans and the world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require for workers to gain and maintain employment in the career pathway models for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics include: Aerospace Engineer, Computer Engineer, Product Designer, Mechanical Engineer, Manufacturing Supervisor, Robotics Technician, Civil Engineer and Laser Technician. Transportation, Distribution, & Logistics K574 Automotive Basics Transcript Code: AUTOBASC Credit: 1 Automotive Basics includes the knowledge of the basic automotive systems and the theory and principals of the components that make up each system and how to service these systems. Automotive Basics includes applicable safety and environmental rules and regulations. In Automotive Basics, students will gain knowledge and the skills in the repair, maintenance, and servicing of vehicle systems. This study allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. The focus of this course is to teach safety, tool identifications, proper tool use, and employability. K5792 Automotive Technology I: Maintenance and Light Repair Prerequisite: Automotive Basics Transcript Code: AUTOTEC1 Credit: 2 This course includes knowledge of the major automotive systems and the principles of diagnosing and servicing these systems. This course includes applicable safety and environmental rules and regulations. Students will gain knowledge and the skills in the repair, maintenance, and diagnosis of vehicle systems. This student allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. The focus of this course is to teach safety, tool identification, proper tool use, and employability. K5802 Automotive Technology II: Automotive Service Prerequisite: Automotive Technology I: Maintenance and Light Repair Transcript Code: AUTOTEC2 Credit: 2 This course includes knowledge of the major automotive systems and principles of diagnosing and servicing these systems. This course includes applicable safety and environmental rules and regulations. Students will gain knowledge and skills in the repair, maintenance, and diagnosis of vehicle systems. This study will allow students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. The focus of this course is to teach safety, tool identification, proper tool use, and employability. K589K Automotive Technology II: Automotive Service w/Lab Prerequisite: A minimum of one credit from the courses in the Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics Career Cluster Co-requisite: Automotive Technology I: Automotive Services, Collision Repair, Paint, and Refinishing Transcript Code: AUTOLAB2 Credit: 3 This course provides the opportunity to extend knowledge of the major transportation systems, and the principles o diagnosing and servicing these systems. Topics in this course may include alternative fuels such as hybrid, bio-diesel, hydrogen, compressed natural gas (CNG), liquidized natural gas (LNG), propane, and solar; total electric vehicles and power trains; advanced transportation systems such as collision avoidance, telematics, vehicle stability control, navigation, vehicle-to-vehicle communications; and other technologies. This student will allow students to have an increased understanding of the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics in all aspects of these systems. This will reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of relevant activities, problems, and settings. K590 Basic Collision Repair and Refinishing Transcript Code: BASCOLRR Credit: 1 In this course students receive training on the proper handling of hazardous waste and EPA issues together with technical information about specific auto body safety and health situations. Specific training is provided in tools/equipment usage, parts assembly, filler application, and straightening techniques. Students receive training in use of sanding abrasives, refinishing products, tools and equipment, masking procedures, corrosion protection, and paint preparations. K5812 Collision Repair Prerequisite: Basic Collision Repair and Refinishing Transcript Code: COLLISR Credit: 2 In this course, students will learn the processed, technologies, and materials used in the reconstruction of vehicles. This course is designed to teach the concepts and theory of systems related to automotive collision repair and refinishing as well as provide the student with information regarding employment opportunities and certification requirements in the field of collision repair. K5822 Paint and Refinishing Prerequisite: Basic Collision Repair and Refinishing or Collision Repair Transcript Code: PAINTREF Credit: 2 In this course, students will learn the processes, technologies, and materials used in the reconstruction of vehicles. This course is designed to teach the concepts and theory of systems related to automotive paint and refinishing. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the basic types of refinishing procedures for the different types of vehicle body construction used in the auto refinishing industry, learn to estimate parts and labor costs on paint and refinishing orders, and perform precision measurements of paint and refinishing orders. K5872 Practicum in Transportation Systems The practicum course is a paid or unpaid capstone experience for students participating in a coherent sequence of courses in the Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics cluster. Grades 11-12 Transcript Code: PRACTRS1 05/09/2018 75 Credit: 2 This course is a paid or unpaid capstone experience for students participating in a coherent sequence of career technical education courses in the Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics Career Cluster. This practicum is designed to give students supervised practical application of knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience such as internships, mentorships, independent study, or laboratories. The practicum can either be school lab based or work based. K591K Extended Practicum in Transportation Systems Co-requisite: Extended Practicum in Transportation Systems must be taken concurrently with Practicum in Transportation Systems and may not be taken as a stand-alone course. Transcript Code: EXPRTRS1 Credit: 3 This course is designed to give student supervised practical application of knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience such as internships, mentorships, independent study, or laboratories. The practicum can either be school lab based or work based. Computer Science 886A/B Fundamentals of Computer Science Transcript Code: TAFCS Credit: 1 Fundamentals of Computer Science is intended as a first course for those students just beginning the study of computer science. Students will learn about the computing tools that are used every day. Students will foster their creativity and innovation through opportunities to design, implement, and present solutions to real-world problems. Students will collaborate and use computer science concepts to access, analyze, and evaluate information needed to solve problems. Students will learn the problem-solving and reasoning skills that are the foundation of computer science. By using computer science knowledge and skills that support the work of individuals and groups in solving problems, students will select the technology appropriate for the task, synthesize knowledge, create solutions, and evaluate the results. Students will learn digital citizenship by researching current laws and regulations and by practicing integrity and respect. Students will gain an understanding of the principles of computer science through the study of technology operations and concepts. 858 Computer Science Principles AP Transcript Code: APCSPRIN Prerequisite: Algebra I (recommended) Credit: 1 This course is equivalent to a first-semester introductory college computing course. Students will develop computational thinking skills vital for success across all disciplines, such as using computational tools to analyze and study data and working with large data sets to analyze, visualize, and draw conclusions from trends. Students are encouraged to apply creative processes when developing computational artifacts and to think creatively while using computer software and other technology that interests them. Students will also develop effective communication and collaboration skills through discussions and writing. Prerequisites: Students should have successfully completed Algebra I. * This course is complementary to AP Computer Science A. These courses can be taken in any order or at the same time, as schedules permit. 860 Computer Science I PreAP Prerequisite: Algebra I (recommended) Transcript Code: TACS1 Credit: 1 This course is designed to provide an in-depth study of the major components of computer science. Course content will include programming methodologies, simple data structures, algorithms, and an introduction to Object Oriented Programming design and implementation. The program language used is Java and the development environment is JCreator. Both are free software to encourage student use at home. 861 Computer Science II PreAP Prerequisite: Computer Science I PreAP Transcript Code: TACS2 Credit: 1 Computer Science II is a continuation of the object oriented programming techniques studied in Computer Science I. Course is taught using the Java programming language. Topics include advanced programming algorithms and data structures including Java Collections, big-O analysis, sorting techniques, recursion, linked lists, stacks, queues, and trees. 863 Computer Science I AP Prerequisite: Computer Science I PreAP Transcript Code: APTACSA Credit: 1 This course follows the College Board Computer Science Advanced Placement Guidelines. The course will be taught using the programming language Java. The Barron s study guide will be used in preparation for the AP Computer Science A test. This course may be counted as a math credited on the Recommended Plan ONLY. Students are required to take the AP Computer Science exam. 866 Digital Art and Animation Transcript Code: TADGAA Credit: 1 Students will explore the world of digital imagery, putting their creativity and imaginations to work and translating their ideas into graphic designs and animations. Using industry-leading software tools they learn to take their ideas from visualization to design, using their computer skills to produce a wide variety of finished products. The course includes introduction to Adobe s Illustrator and Photoshop and Macromedia s. 871 Digital Design and Media Production Transcript Code: TADGDMP Credit: 1 An advanced newspaper course focusing on developing creative layouts, copy, and computer graphics through use of computer software for newspaper publishing. This hands-on course will use Adobe InDesign and Photoshop. 870 Independent Study: Technology Applications I Prerequisites: AP Computer Science or Computer Science I or II PreAP Transcript Code: TAIND1 872 Independent Study: Technology Applications II Transcript Code: TAIND2 874 Independent Study: Technology Applications III Transcript Code: TAIND3 Credit: 1 These project-based courses are intended to provide opportunities for 05/09/2018 76 students to either explore topic areas in computer science in greater depth and/or breadth than is possible in the PreAP/AP Computer Science sequence. Programming topics will center on object-oriented programming (OOP) with languages such as C++, Turbo C++, Perl, Visual Basic, Visual C++, and Professional Builder C++. Multifile programming may also be included. Other possible projects include networking, web mastering, advanced digital graphics and animation, and game design. Military Science 8801 Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) I 8802 Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) II 8803 Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) III 8804 Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) IV Credit: 1 This course introduces students to the Armed Forces and the rights, responsibilities, privileges, and freedoms that underlie good citizenship. It helps students develop leadership skills, communications techniques, and the ability to work with others. Cadets develop a strong sense of pride in self, associates, school and community. They will also learn drill, physical conditioning, and skills associated with the military branch in which they are enrolled. Please refer to individual campus brochures for complete course information. Other KM3622 PIHS CNA & Phlebotomy Prerequisite: 18 years of age by October 15, application Credit: 2 This preparation course is designed for entry level nursing assistants to achieve a level of knowledge, skills and abilities essential to provide basic care to residents of long-term care facilities. Topics include residents rights, communication, safety, observation, reporting and assisting residents in maintaining basic comfort and safety. Emphasis is placed on effective interaction with members of the health care team. Some clinical time is arranged outside of the classroom hours. It is the student s responsibility to pay for the CNA certification exam, personal liability insurance, and uniform. K075K Career Preparation I Transcript Code: CAREERP1 Credit: 3 K076K Career Preparation II Transcript Code: CAREERP2 Credit: 3 A cooperative education program which combines occupational related classroom instruction and on-the-job training experiences. Employers who hire students to work during each school day at wage rates equitable for beginning employees provide specific job skill training. Students also receive training on specialized equipment as needed to perform duties for some companies. The student must have and maintain a job in order to receive credit for this course. Workforce Dual Credit KM4631E EMT Basics Credit: 1 This course is designed to assist students in understanding the consequences of emergencies and disasters and in preparing for their roles and responsibilities in an emergency. In addition, the course has information on addressing mental health needs and the needs of special populations in an emergency. The purpose of this course is to uncover the principles that promotes effective disaster response and recovery operations. To achieve this goal, the course will examine the nature of disasters as well as the roles and responsibilities of various actors involved in emergency management. The importance of addressing the needs of the affected population will be discussed, and will include recommendations to fulfill a variety of important response and recovery functions. Various problems associated with response and recovery operations will be identified. The role of technology and the importance of communications and coordination will be emphasized. Each student will be expected to gain a solid comprehension of common post-disaster problems and how responders may overcome those challenges now and in the future. KM4642E Practicum in Law, PS, Corrections, & Security The practicum course is a paid or unpaid capstone experience for students participating in a coherent of career and technical education courses in Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security cluster. Grades 11-12 Credit: 2 Preparation for certification as an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). Includes all the skills necessary to provide emergency medical care at a basic life support level with an emergency service or other specialized services. Student purchases textbook and provides uniform and proof of immunizations. Course completion requires two classes, EMT-Basic - and EMT-Basic Clinical. KM4762E Welding I Credit: 2 KM4772E Welding II Credit: 2 Course is located at Lone Star College Conroe Center. Students will pursue the American Welding Certification through these courses. Instruction is designed to provide job-specific training for entry-level employment in welding careers. First-year instruction includes blueprint reading, cutting and welding with oxygen and gas fuels, shielded metal arc welding, gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc welding processes. The second-year instruction enhances job-specific training for employment in welding careers. KM4782E Precision Metal Manufacturing I Credit: 2 KM4792E Precision Metal Manufacturing II CNC offered at Lone Star Credit: 2 Instruction is designed to provide job-specific training for entry-level employment skills in metal machinist careers. First year instruction includes precision measuring, blueprint reading, drilling, turning, coring, milling, broaching, reaming, with instruction in numerically-controlled machining. Second year instruction enhances job-specific training in metal machinist careers. KM5792E Automotive Technology I: Maintenance & Light Repair (This course is a combination of Automotive Technology and Advanced Automotive Technology) Credit: 2 Course is located at Lone Star College Conroe Center. Automotive services include advanced knowledge of the 05/09/2018 77 function of the major automotive systems and principles of diagnosing and servicing these systems. In Automotive Technology, students gain knowledge and skills in the repair, maintenance and diagnosis of vehicle systems. This study allows student to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. The focus of this course is to teach the theory of operation of automotive vehicle systems and associated repair practices in a pre-employment laboratory. KM5802E Automotive Technology II: Automotive Service (This course is a combination of Automotive Technology and Advanced Automotive Technology) Credit: 2 Course is located at Conroe High School. Automotive services include advanced knowledge of the function of the major automotive systems and the principles of diagnosing and servicing these systems. In Advanced Automotive Technology, students gain knowledge and skills in the repair, maintenance, and diagnosis of vehicle systems. This study allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. The focus of this course is to teach the theory of operation of automotive vehicle systems and associated repair practices. 885H Driver Education Credit: .5 Prerequisite: Students must be at least 15 years old before taking the driving section of the course and have a social security card. Fees will apply. Please note that parent-supervised driving outside of this course is required to receive the certificate of completion. 05/09/2018 78 Conroe ISD Student Transportation Agreement This agreement amends the 2018-2019 Policies and Fees Agreement between ____________ High School and the undersigned, Parent(s) or other legally responsible person for the Conroe ISD student identified herein (the Student ). Student Name: ____________________________________ During the student school year 2018-2019, ________ High School will arrange for bus transportation services to and from Lone Star College-Conroe Center for such Student. The services will include identified pickup and drop-off places at identified ranges of times. SCOPE OF SERVICE: Conroe ISD will offer transportation service to and from______ High School and Lone Star College Conroe Center, for the 2018-2019 school year. Conroe ISD agrees to provide school bus transportation to accommodate those CISD students enrolled in afternoon Dual Credit Career & Technical Education Courses and Workforce Education courses. Afternoon: 2:00pm Pickup / Depart School for Lone Star College Conroe Center 4:30pm Pickup / Depart Lone Star College Conroe Center 5:00pm Buses arrives at home campus 5:30pm Students picked up by parent The undersigned have read and fully understand the terms and conditions of this Student Transportation Agreement and the signature(s) below indicate my/our agreement to be legally bound thereby. Parent/Guardian Parent /Guardian Date CONROE INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT PUBLIC NOTIFICATION OF NONDISCRIMINATION IN CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS 1. Conroe ISD offers Career and Technical Education programs in agriculture, food and natural resources, architecture and construction, arts, A/V technology and communications, business management and administration, education and training, finance, government and public administration, health science, hospitality and tourism, human services, information technology, law, public safety, corrections and security, manufacturing, marketing, science, technology, engineering and materials, and transportation, distribution and logistics. Admission to these programs is based on interest in subject, required prerequisites and course availability. 2. It is the policy of Conroe ISD not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex or handicap in its vocational programs, services or activities as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended: Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972; and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. 3. It is the policy of Conroe ISD not to discriminate on the basis of race, national origin, sex, handicap, or age in its employment practices as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1864, as amended; Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972: The Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended; and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. 4. Conroe ISD will take steps to assure the lack of English language skills will not be a barrier to admission and participation in all educational and vocational programs. 5. For information about your rights or grievance procedures, contact the Title IX Coordinator, Carrie Galatas and/or the Section 504 Coordinator, Teresa Canon, Conroe Independent School District; 3205 W. Davis; Conroe, TX 77304; Ph: 936-709-7752 05/09/2018 79 How to Use This Planning Guide: Junior High Course Selection Philosophy In conjunction with parents, we want every student to take the appropriate courses based on available information and interests. Please consider your child s outside of school activity responsibilities in making academic placement decisions. As the parent/guardian, you make final selections based on the date published by your Junior High School. Required Courses List of required subjects and electives: 7th Grade Language Arts (2 Semesters) Mathematics (2 Semesters) Science (2 Semesters) Texas History (2 Semesters) Physical Education (2 Semesters) Electives 4 (1 Semester) * 8th Grade Language Arts (2 Semesters) Mathematics (2 Semesters) Science (2 Semesters) History (2 Semesters) Physical Education (2 Semesters) Electives 5 (1 Semester) * *A two-semester elective may be substituted for two one-semester elective choices. Course Registration One of the most critical functions performed by a school is the registration of students. Based on the information submitted by parents/guardians, courses are scheduled and staffing decisions are made for the next school year. Therefore, it is important that course selection be given serious consideration. Every effort will be made to accommodate all students, but this may not be possible due to class size, times slots, conflicts with specialized class a student requests, etc. Please make sure that you include alternate elective courses with the online choices. Alternates will be used when one of the student s first choices is not available. Year-long electives should not be chosen as alternative selections. All elective classes offered may be utilized to properly complete a student s schedule. Any student enrolling in any course, included Pre-Advanced Placement Core Courses, Athletics, Off Campus Physical Education, Band, Choir, and/or Orchestra is making a commitment to be in that program for one year. Full year electives may not be listed as alternates as these are courses which a student needs to be firmly committed before choosing. Course Request Deadlines Conroe ISD works hard to recruit and keep the best teachers in the business. In April, we begin to build our master schedule, as well as individual student schedules, based on the choices students and parents made by course request deadline. Additionally, we hire specific staff based on these requests. Assignment to Classes Academic Courses 7th Grade Parents/Guardians working in conjunction with their children and school personnel choose core classes on language arts, social studies, and science that are identified as regular (R) and/or Pre-Advanced Placement (Pre-AP). All regular education classes are high school/college preparatory. Gifted/Talented (GT) students must qualify for the GT program based on the criteria set by the district. A student and parent/guardian signing the course registration form agree to remain in the course for the entire year. The parents/guardians of any student not meeting that expectation will be notified and encouraged to have the student placed in the regular program for the next year. A student identified as GT in a core area should enroll into the corresponding Pre-AP class for that discipline. Ultimately, as the parent/guardian, you will be able to place your child in any level of language arts, science, or social studies you choose for your general education student as long as we receive notification. 05/09/2018 80 Math assignments are completely different in that it is critical students receive each sequential math course along the way to obtain the foundation needed for math success in junior high, high school, and beyond. Student Course Requests Online Incoming seventh and eighth grade students for the 2018-2019 will choose courses online this year. These requests will take place through Parent Access. Most courses are open enrollment in nature. High School algebra is a notable exception. Detailed information will be provided throughout the course selection process as your children request electives and choose core language arts, science, and social studies courses for 2018-2019. Placements for band, choir, and orchestra will be announced on the tentative schedule students receive in August. All placements are final. When completing requests online, please take the time to read all the helpful information included with the tip sheet your child was provided. Your child can choose either regular or Pre-AP classes in all core courses except math. Please consider homework demands for each course and the grades you wish your child to achieve when making these selections. Helpful details are available in the Program of Studies. Math Guidelines for Algebra 1 and Application for Credit by Exam Guidelines for Algebra 1: Application for CBE: Math Course Selection for Incoming 7th Graders Parents/guardians of incoming seventh grade students will select the math course in which they feel their student is best prepared: 7th grade Math 7th grade Pre-Algebra Pre-AP Seventh grade students have open enrollment for seventh grade math or Pre-Algebra Pre-AP (eighth grade math). What if My Child Qualifies for High School Algebra? If your child qualifies for high school algebra, we will contact you before placing them into this math class, which is operating two years ahead of grade level. You will need to opt your child in to the high school algebra class once he/she qualifies Students in high school algebra are responsible for taking the STAAR high school algebra end of course (EOC) examination. An advanced math sixth grade student who passes the Readiness Exam for entrance into Pre-Algebra Pre-AP, but fails to successfully pass the district Algebra Readiness Exam, will be placed in Pre-Algebra Pre-AP working one year ahead in math. Academic Courses 8th Grade Parents, guardians, and students will choose a course for language arts, science, and social studies at the desire level of Regular (R) or Pre-Advanced Placement (Pre-AP). All regular education classes are high school/college preparatory. Gifted/Talented (GT) students must qualify for the GT program based on the criteria set by the district. All identified GT students will automatically qualify for the Pre-AP program in the specific areas of study in which they have been identified. All students in an advanced program are expected to meet all course expectations with a minimum of a 70%. A student and parent/guardian signing the commitment form agree to remain in the course for the entire year. Parents/guardians will choose their child s eighth grade core courses. In math, students should be rolled to the next corresponding course in the math learning sequence. For example, a student in level seventh grade math will go to eighth grade Pre-Algebra. A student in seventh grade pre-algebra Pre-AP will move to high school algebra Pre-AP in eighth grade. 05/09/2018 81 Math Course Selection for Incoming 8th Graders Incoming eighth graders normally will roll to the next appropriate course in the math sequence. For example, students in seventh grade math will progress to eighth grade Pre-Algebra. Seventh grade students in Pre-Algebra will take Algebra in eighth grade. Seventh grade algebra students will take geometry in eighth grade. For a student to move from seventh grade level math to high school Algebra I, students must meet all of the following criteria: 80+ average in seventh grade math Final Level II or Level III on STAAR Math in 6th grade and 7th grade Minimum of 70% on the Pre-Algebra Readiness Exam Minimum score of 70% on the Algebra Readiness Exam We will administer the readiness exams on our campus. Calculator Information 7th Level Math: Calculators are not used in this course. 7th Pre-Algebra, 8th Pre-Algebra, Algebra, and Geometry: Graphing calculators are used throughout these courses. The TI-84 Plus is the recommended calculator, and all calculators in the TI-83 and TI-84 series are compatible. Students are not required to purchase a graphing calculator as calculators are available for student use at school. Owning a graphing calculator can be helpful for completing some assignments outside of class. Students who do not own a graphing calculator are welcome to use the school calculators during Advisory, before-school tutorials after school in order to complete the assignments which incorporate calculator use. Electives Students will rank all of the electives based on their preference. The computer system will then schedule each student's academics and electives. The elective choices are determined by which courses will work in the student s schedule. Every effort is made for each student to receive as many of his or her elective choices as possible. Year-long electives should not be selected as alternates on the course request sheets. Please remember that students have nine elective slots over two years. There are a total of twelve unique electives for students to take other than band, choir, orchestra, athletics, and high school Spanish. Most students will take most electives offered over the two-year period. If any of these appear incorrect, or if you would like to make a change, please submit these changes to the Counseling Center prior to the deadline. These elective change requests need to be submitted in writing either by email or a hand delivered note to the front office. For purposes of completing a specific student schedule, it is possible that a student may receive an elective which they did not request. Grading Each semester is divided into two nine-week increments. A report card will be issued at the end the year as well as made available online. A student s report card can also be viewed by accessing the Parent Access Center at This free service also gives parents/guardians a fairly recent update of grades in almost real time during each nine weeks. Dates for progress reports will be posted on our website in the student and parent services sections. Nine-week grading is determined as follows: Major Grades (Exams, Projects) 60% Daily Grades 20 % Other 20 % For junior high classes, each nine-week grade will account for 45 percent of the overall semester grade. A final semester exam worth 10% will be administered. Students taking high school courses (algebra, geometry, health, communications applications, Spanish, and Spanish II for Native Speakers) will have their semester exams count for 15% of their grade. Please schedule holiday and end of year vacation plans around these important cumulative semester exams. Final semester averages for junior high classes will be determined as follows: 05/09/2018 82 First nine-weeks: 45% Second nine-weeks: 45% Semester Exam: 10% 100% Final semester averages for high school classes will be determined as follows: First nine-weeks: Second nine-weeks: Semester Exam: 15% 100% Note that students in high school algebra are mandated by the Texas Education Agency to take the STAAR end of course exams for those courses. Grade breakdown will be assigned as follows: 90-100 A 80-89 B 75-79 C 70-74 D Below 70 F Please note that to maintain UIL eligibility, students must pass all courses, including any high school courses or Pre-AP courses taken. Seventy percent is considered the passing threshold for For a complete listing of UIL eligibility dates, please visit our campus website. Homework is due on the day designated by the instructor. These assignments may be taken as a grade. 05/09/2018 83 Catalog of Courses: Junior High 7th Grade Courses 7110 Language Arts 7 Credit: 1 In 7th grade, students refine and master previously learned knowledge and skills that make up the basic foundation blocks of language arts. Emphasis is placed on developing literary, composition, grammar, vocabulary and spoken skills. Students continue to read widely in classic, contemporary and informational text selections and to use different forms of writing with a strong emphasis on conventions and style on a regular basis. This course will strengthen knowledge and increase the academic challenge of all students. 7120 Language Arts 7 PreAP Credit: 1 PreAP language arts in 7th grade covers more elaborate complex and in-depth studies of literature, composition, grammar and vocabulary in addition to the state standards as outlined in the TEKS objectives required of all students. It is also at a higher level of difficulty than that in grade-level classes. This course begins the foundation of vertically aligned skills and strategies needed for success in AP English courses. 7201 Math 7 Credit: 1 The primary focal points at grade 7 are using proportional relationships in numbers, geometry, measurement, and probability; applying addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of decimals, fractions, and integers; and using statistical measures to describe data. Students will learn the necessary skills to critically think at a higher-level and to meet the state standards as outlined in the TEKS objectives. 7205 PreAlgebra 7 PreAP Credit: 1 The course builds a foundation of basic understandings in number, operation, and quantitative reasoning; patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking; geometry and spatial reasoning; measurement; and probability and statistics. The course content will include complex, and in-depth study of major ideas, problems, and themes in order to extend and deepen comprehension. 7300 Science 7 Credit: 1 Science for grade 7 is an integration of life, earth and physical sciences but will focus more strongly on life science. Students will conduct investigations to learn about the natural world through questioning, observing, and drawing conclusions. 7303 Science 7 PreAP Credit: 1 PreAP grade 7 Science begins the foundation of vertically aligned skills and strategies for success in AP courses in science. The course follows a similar curriculum with greater depth and complexity. Students are required to complete a long-term project typically requiring additional time outside of school. 7400 Texas History 7 Credit: 1 Students explore eras of Texas history from the cultures of Native Americans to the modern day urban society. The structure and function of governments as well as the rights and responsibilities of Texas citizens help students to understand the importance of patriotism and appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation. 7403 Texas History 7 PREAP Credit: 1 Pre-AP Texas history begins the foundation of vertically aligned skills and strategies for success in AP courses in the social studies. The course centers on the process of learning factual information, developing analytical skills, and writing clearly. 7500 Physical Education 7 Credit: .5-1 Students will participate in activities to increase their cardiovascular endurance and flexibility. They will earn aspects of different team and individual sports. The goal is to improve a student s physical and social skill level and to provide students with a positive experience to prepare them for team sports as well as a lifetime of exercise. 7509/7510 Girls Athletics/Boys Athletics 7 Credit: 1 Students who sign up for athletics are making the commitment to remain in that program for the entire year. Each athlete will be responsible for providing transportation to and from practices as well as transportation home after games. Please read the athletic information prior to participation and talk with a coach if you have any questions. Students who try out for a sport but are not selected will remain in the course to build physical skills for a subsequent year tryout. 7505 Drill Team/Dance 7 Credit: 1 Tryouts for drill team will be before the end of the current school year. Students chosen for the team will automatically be enrolled in this class. Students will master movement principles and skills, self-discipline and healthy bodies. Attendance and practice requirements, performances, membership, and cost requirements will be discussed before tryouts. 7511 Volleyball 7 Credit: 1 7512 Football 7 Credit: 1 7513 Boys Basketball 7 Credit: 1 7514 Private PE 7 Credit: 1 This course is for students who participate in a minimum of fifteen hours per week in highly intensive, professional, supervised training in an approved sport outside the school day. In order to be enrolled in this class, students must process the required paperwork to receive district approval. 7515 Private PE 7 Level 2 Credit: 1 7516 Soccer 7 Credit: 1 This course will focus on the fundamentals of soccer as well as allowing the students to practice their newly acquired skills. 05/09/2018 84 7517 Girls Basketball 7 Credit: 1 7526 Cross Country 7 Credit: 1 Cross Country is for anyone interested in running. Daily workouts consist of running two to five miles depending on physical conditioning and workout schedule. Cross Country meets involve running a two-mile race where most courses go through parks, trails, and other types of terrain. 8th Grade Courses 8110 Language Arts 8 Credit: 1 Students will continue to refine and master previously learned knowledge and skills that make up the basic foundation blocks of language arts emphasized by literary, composition, grammar, vocabulary, and spoken skills. 8th grade students will read widely in classic, contemporary, and informational texts. They will also produce multi-paragraph compositions with a strong emphasis on varied sentence structure and other conventions of written language. This course will strengthen knowledge and increase the academic challenge of all students. 8120 Language Arts 8 PreAP Credit: 1 The Pre AP course in 8th grade meets the standards and expectations as outlined in the TEKS objectives and will continue developing deeper skills needed to be successful on more elaborate, complex, and in-depth studies of literature, compositions, grammar and vocabulary. This course will continue building the foundation of vertically aligned skills and strategies needed for success in AP English courses. 8205 PreAlgebra 8 Credit: 1 The course builds a foundation of basic understandings in number, operation, and quantitative reasoning; patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking; geometry and spatial reasoning; measurement; and probability and statistics. Students will learn the necessary skills to critically think at a higher-level and to meet the state standards as outlined in the TEKS objectives. 8300 Science 8 Credit: 1 Science for grade 8 is an integration of life, earth and physical sciences but will focus more strongly on earth science. Students will conduct investigations to learn about the natural world through questioning, observing, and drawing conclusions. 8303 Science 8 PreAP Credit: 1 PreAP grade 8 Science continues to develop skill for success in AP courses in science. The course follows a similar curriculum with greater depth and complexity. Students are required to complete a long-term project typically requiring additional time outside of school. 8400 US History 8 Credit: 1 Students study the history of the United States from colonial times through Reconstruction. The course focuses on the political, economic, and social events and issues related to the eras. The class incorporates a wide variety of primary sources and biographical information to develop an understanding of the past. 8403 US History 8 PREAP Credit: 1 Pre-AP US history builds on the foundation of vertically aligned skills and strategies for success in AP courses in the social studies. The course centers on the process of learning factual information, developing analytical skills, and writing clearly. 8500 Physical Education 8 Credit: .5 - 1 Students will participate in activities to increase their cardiovascular endurance and flexibility. They will earn aspects of different team and individual sports. The goal is to improve a student s physical and social skill level and to provide students with a positive experience to prepare them for team sports as well as a lifetime of exercise. 8505 Drill Team/Dance 8 Credit: 1 Tryouts for drill team will be before the end of the current school year. Students chosen for the team will automatically be enrolled in this class. Students will master movement principles and skills, self-discipline and healthy bodies. Attendance and practice requirements, performances, membership, and cost requirements will be discussed before tryouts. 8509/8510 Girls Athletics/Boys Athletics 8 Credit: 1 Students who sign up for athletics are making the commitment to remain in that program for the entire year. Each athlete will be responsible for providing transportation to and from practices as well as transportation home after games. Please read the athletic information prior to participation and talk with a coach if you have any questions. 8511 Volleyball 8 Credit: 1 8512 Football 8 Credit: 1 8513 Boys Basketball 8 Credit: 1 8514 Private PE 8 Credit: 1 This course is for students who participate in a minimum of fifteen hours per week in highly intensive, professional, supervised training in an approved sport outside the school day. In order to be enrolled in this class, students must process the required paperwork to receive district approval. See the counselor for additional information. 8515 Private PE 8 Level 2 Credit: 1 8516 Soccer 8 Credit: .5 This course will focus on the fundamentals of soccer as well as allowing the students to practice their newly acquired skills. 8517 Girls Basketball 8 Credit: 1 8526 Cross Country 8 Credit: 1 Cross Country is for anyone interested in running. Daily workouts consist of running two to five miles depending on physical conditioning and workout schedule. Cross Country meets involve running a two-mile race where most courses go through parks, trails, and other types of terrain. 05/09/2018 85 Electives 9700H/9800H Music Appreciation Credit: .5 Music Appreciation is for students who are interested in music but do not want to be part of a performing group. It includes the study of all phases of music, including history, theory, vocal, and instrumental music. Other topics include popular music, music for the stage and screen, music technology, music and careers. 9705/9805 Beginner Band Credit: 1 This class is for new instrumental musicians. Selection of instruments is made upon the recommendation of the band director. Students will be required to purchase various instrument supplies and rent/purchase their chosen instrument. Students who choose band as an elective are making a commitment to remain in the program for the entire year. A fee will be charged if a student is using a school-owned instrument. Band Credit: 1 Students develop musical ability by participating in large and small ensembles and solo performances. Students will be expected to attend various rehearsals and performances outside the regular school day. Students are placed in appropriate band classes commensurate with their skill levels following a competitive audition. Students who choose band as an elective are making a commitment to remain in the program for the entire year. A fee will be charged if a student is using a school-owned instrument. Choir Credit: 1 Students participate through group and solo activities that allow them to develop vocal and choral techniques that include reading, listening and appreciation. Students will be expected to attend various rehearsals and performances outside the regular school day. Students are placed in appropriate choir classes commensurate with their skill levels following a competitive audition. Students who choose choir as an elective are making a commitment to remain in the program for the entire year. 9717/9817 Beginner Orchestra Credit: 1 Beginner Orchestra is for new string musicians (violin, viola, cello and string bass only). Instrument selection is made with the recommendation of the orchestra director. Students will be required to purchase various instrument supplies and rent/purchase their chosen instrument. Students who choose orchestra as an elective are making a commitment to remain in the program for the entire year. A fee will be charged if a student is using a school-owned instrument. Orchestra Credit: 1 Students continue to develop their appreciation and understanding as musicians through performance in large and small groups and solos. Students will be expected to attend various rehearsals and performances outside the regular school day. Students are placed in appropriate orchestra classes commensurate with their skill levels following a competitive audition. Students who choose orchestra as an elective are making a commitment to remain in the program for the entire year. A fee will be charged if a student is using a school-owned instrument. 9714/9814 Cheerleading Credit: 1 This course provides a specific knowledge and experience of cheerleading skills, with emphasis on motion sharpness and placement, tumbling skills, stunts, dance, teamwork, spirit, and enthusiasm at an elite level. Participation is expected outside of the school day and is part of the grade in cheerleading. Cheerleaders may perform at junior high football games, volleyball games, basketball games, pep rallies, parades, select high school football and basketball games, and competitions. Enrollment is limited to those students who are selected to the Cheerleading squad. Tryouts are held during the spring semester for the following school year. 9715H/9815H Science Investigations Credit: .5 In this course, students will use critical thinking and scientific problem solving skills to explore a variety of science topics, such as forensics and human diseases. Students will also use computers and information technology tools to perform and support scientific investigations. 9740H/9840H Theater Arts I Credit: .5 Students will learn expressive techniques, acting concepts, theater production concepts and appreciation of theatrical events. They will learn mime, improvisation, basic combat techniques, and character development. In class, students will explore script writing and will participate in storytelling, puppetry, Reader s Theater, and play production. 9741H/9841H Theater Arts II Prerequisite: Theater Arts I Credit: .5 Students extend and continue activities and objectives of Theater Arts I. They will increase their experiences inexpressive techniques, acting concepts, theater production concepts and appreciation of theatrical events. Students will participate in a variety of activities including Reader s Theater, single and ensemble acting, improvisation, script writing, and all aspects of play production. 9742/9842 Theater Troupe Credit: .5-1 Students will develop and experience a working knowledge of play production through various performance opportunities. Students will be expected to attend rehearsals and performances outside the regular school day. Students who choose Theater Troupe as an elective are making a commitment to the program. 9746H/9846H Theater Production Credit: .5 Theater Production is offered to 8th grade students who have completed Theater Arts I. This class has the option of competing in acting tournaments (participation in tournaments not required). The class will work or perform in all productions at the school. 9743H/9843H Art I Credit: .5 Through a variety of two and three-dimensional mediums, students build a strong foundation in the elements and principles of art. The curriculum allows each student to build on previous art experiences and prepares them for more advanced levels of art. Students will be exposed to and encouraged to develop an art portfolio. 9744H/9844H Art II Prerequisite: Art I 05/09/2018 86 Credit: .5 Students create art with emphasis on art history: prehistoric to modern. A portfolio will be developed and maintained. 9845H Art III Prerequisite: Art II Credit: .5 Students will focus on applying their knowledge of the elements and principles of design into works of art that convey concepts and ideas that are original and unique. Independence is highly encouraged in the creative decision-making process. The main focus of the class will be the development of a portfolio that meets the requirements for acceleration into the HS Art II curriculum. 9748H/9848H Ceramics Credit: .5 While exploring a variety of hand building and glazing techniques, students will incorporate theory and technique to create complex and interesting three-dimensional art forms. 9751H/9851H Exploring Languages Credit: .5 The student will explore and experience the linguistic skills of Spanish, German, and French through listening, speaking, reading and writing. They will gain skills in studying a language and learn about the cultures associated with these three languages. This course does not count toward high school graduation requirements. 9752H Communications 7 Credit: .5 This one semester course is designed to prepare 7th grade students to be effective communicators. From speaking to listening, we cover all aspects of communication by allowing students to work independently, in pairs, and in groups while focusing on different types of public speaking. Students will be encouraged to work on the clarity of their message. All assignments are geared to building the students' confidence. In addition, this course well prepares students for the high school Communication Applications class. 9753H/9853H Debate Credit: .5 In this course students will learn to plan, prepare, research, analyze and develop speaking skills. All students will participate in several individual speaking categories: impromptu speaking, extemporaneous speaking, oratory, and oral interpretation. Students will be expected to attend area debate competitions outside the regular school day. 9754H/9854H Investigating Careers: Technology I Credit: .5 This course investigates the tools, materials, and processes utilized in today s technical career fields. An emphasis on math, science and reading, to explore valid, current educational and career opportunities will drive this program. Students will fully engage each technology related career topic by experiencing activities and projects that relate to each topic. Whether it is programming a robot, building a rocket, or filming a news brief student s gain current knowledge in a practical instructional format. Students will incorporate decision-making tools and problem-solving skills for college and career planning. This course builds upon skills from academic subjects, information technology, and interpersonal communication to give each student a solid foundation to make personal career choices. 9755H/9855H Investigating Careers: Technology II Credit: .5 This course uses a systems technology, as it relates to tools, materials, and processes, with an emphasis on math, science and reading, to explore valid, current educational and career opportunities. Through cooperative learning and project management, the student will gain a better understanding about themselves, their interests, and their abilities. Students will incorporate decision-making tools and problem-solving skills for college and career planning. This course builds upon skills from academic subjects, information technology, and interpersonal communication. 9757H/9857H Health Credit: .5 This course helps students acquire the information necessary to become healthy adults and learn behaviors in which they should or should not participate. Students use problem solving, research and goal setting to gain knowledge and skills useful in making decisions in the areas of nutrition, CPR, and First Aid, maturity, diseases (including STDs) and drug use. This course is not for High School credit. 9758H/9858H Investigating Careers: Human Services Credit: .5 The goal of this course is to create a culture of high expectation and continuous improvement that provides middle school students with the fundamental life skills required for personal life management. The principal life skills obtained from this course will include money management, career development, food and nutrition, child development, and parenting skills. 9760H/9860H Investigating Careers: Computer Skills Credit: .5 The goal of this course is to build the fundamental keyboarding skills that each student will need to be successful in their pursuit of their career choices. Students will experience the skills necessary to address technical applications of emerging technology careers. Student reading, writing, computing, and communication skills will be enhanced as technology applications are explored. Keyboard specifics will be reinforced through practical application along with proper care and maintenance of the computer. 9761H/9861H Investigating Careers: Computer Science Credit: .5 The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the fundamental computer applications required in today s job market and how those applications can be applied to their personal career choice. Students will learn computer aptitudes and applications that will help them as they progress through high school, college, and career. Topics covered will include multimedia, word processing, spreadsheets, data bases and presentation programs. In addition, students will learn the basics of the internet including: web safety; web based research, web protocol, and other fundamentals of electronic communication. 9887H Investigating Careers: Computer Science II Credit: .5 This is a beginning multimedia class with an emphasis on skills required for basic website construction. Topics include vector and bitmap graphic creation and modification, creation of Flash movies, and website development and creation. 05/09/2018 87 9762 Yearbook I 7 Credit: .5-1 This basic course is required for all students interested in being a member of the yearbook staff. The course offers the student training in the production of the school yearbook. Students develop abilities in gathering information, writing copy and captions, understanding components of quality photography, copy editing skills, and techniques of headlines. 9850 Yearbook I 8 Credit: .5-1 This basic course is required for all students interested in being a member of the yearbook staff. The course offers the student training in the production of the school yearbook. Students develop abilities in gathering information, writing copy and captions, understanding components of quality photography, copy editing skills, and techniques of headlines. 9862 Yearbook II 8 Prerequisite: Yearbook I 7 Credit: .5 -1 This course is for the yearbook staff members. Second year yearbook students continue to develop their journalism skills from Yearbook I. Students further develop their skills and knowledge in the use of publishing software. Students are encouraged to fill an editor s position and take a leadership role in the publication staff. Students will plan a yearbook ladder, complete various spreads and assignments, copy, edit, and complete a portfolio of work. 9763H/9863H Teen Leadership Credit: .5 This course develops business, professional, and leadership skills. Students learn the importance of principle-centered living, how to handle peer pressure, communicating effectively, building meaningful relationships, making responsible decisions and the importance of goals. 9866H Teen Leadership II Prerequisite: Teen Leadership Credit: .5 Teen Leadership II is a continuation of the skills learned in Teen Leadership I. Further emphasis is placed on public speaking skills, personal responsibility, and relationships with peers and family. Students will also develop their own personal mission statement. 9765/9865 TV Broadcasting Credit: 1 Students will learn the fundamentals of news broadcasting including the technical and journalistic sides of the profession. This course is for the student who wants a real life experience in the world of TV broadcasting. 9767H/9867H College & Career Readiness Credit: .5 The primary goal of this course is to introduce students to life and workplace skills by identifying individual values, aptitudes, interests, talents, and current occupational abilities. This course will also help prepare students for high school and college by examining their personality temperaments for potential future career choices. Students will set up their own personal career plan and create a guideline for their life. Various occupations will be explored based on computer research and other resources. Four year course planning and graduation requirements as well as endorsements will be discussed. Various occupations will be explored based on computer research and other resources. Students will be introduced to Naviance, an online web-based tool for career exploration. 9769/9869 Reading Strategies Credit: 1 9771H/9871H Peer Tutor Credit: .5 The student will work with a teacher to provide extra help for students who may be having difficulty. Students are placed in this class based on teacher request, grades, and counselor approval. 9785/9885 Study Skills Credit .5-1 This Course will focus on time management skills, basic study skills, goal setting, and organization. 9792H/9892H Wildlife Management Credit: .5 This course is designed to offer students information about wildlife management and an introduction to agriculture science. 9797H/9897H Office Aide Credit: .5 Students will assist the various offices and library staff in daily paperwork, running errands, and basic office duties. 9756/9856 Social Studies Enrichment 9770/9870 Reading Enrichment 9794/9894 Science Enrichment 9795/9895 Language Arts Enrichment 9796/9896 Math Enrichment 9799/9899 Writing Enrichment Credit: .5 1 All 7th and 8th grade students STAAR scores will be evaluated over the summer. Any student who scores below Level II on a STAAR exam may be required to take a STAAR enrichment class in addition to the core academic course. Several factors will be examined to determine if the student needs the enrichment course as an intervention. These classes are designed to assist the students in areas of weakness as well as teach them good test-taking and study skills. Students may be assigned to a STAAR class during the year based on classroom performance and benchmark scores. Parents who do not want their students to enroll in the STAAR enrichment course(s) will need to consult with the building principal. Junior High Courses for High School Credit Offered at all schools J080H Health Credit: .5 This course helps students acquire the information necessary to become healthy adults and learn behaviors in which they should or should not participate. Students use problem solving, research and goal setting to gain knowledge and skills useful in making decisions in the areas of nutrition, CPR and First Aid, maturity, diseases (including STDs) and drug use. J1621 7th or 8th Grade Algebra Credit: 1 The course builds on the basic foundation of concepts presented in K-8 Mathematics, use symbols to study relationships among quantities, functions to represent and model problem situations, and analyze and interpret relationships. Students will work in many situations to set up equations, use a variety of methods to solve meaningful problems and will continually use problem solving, computation in problem-solving contexts, language and communication. Connections will be made within and outside of mathematics, and reasoning, as well as multiple representations, 05/09/2018 88 applications, modeling, justification and proof. J1641 Geometry Prerequisite: Algebra I Credit: 1 The course builds on the basic foundation of concepts presented in K-8 Mathematics and Algebra I, students use geometric thinking to understand mathematical concepts and relationships among them, study properties and relationships having to do with size, shape, location, direction, and orientation of one, two, and three-dimensional figures. Students will perceive the connection between geometry and the real and mathematical worlds and use geometrical ideas, relationships, and properties to solve problems. Students will use a variety of representations (concrete, pictorial, algebraic, and coordinate), tools, and technology to solve meaningful problems by representing figures, transforming figures, analyzing relationships among figures, and proving concepts related to figures. J260H Communication Applications Credit: .5 Students will learn communication theory and have the opportunity to develop practical skills for both professional and social communication. J3001 Spanish I Credit: 1 This course offers basic understanding of the Spanish language and exposure to the culture of the Spanish-speaking world. Introduction to basic vocabulary and grammar will enable students to learn to discuss everyday topics such as family, school, numbers, time, weather, and clothing. Oral and written practice is stressed. Because of the grammar requirements, a strong basis in language arts is required. Successful completion of this course earns the student one LOTE high school credit. J3161 Spanish I Native Speakers Credit: 1 This course is designed for students whose home language is Spanish. Students will be given the opportunity to expand their ability to comprehend, speak, read, and write Spanish in accordance with their linguistic and cultural strengths. Emphasis will be on reading and writing Spanish, and the understanding of grammatical concepts. Students will be prepared to move on to Spanish II at the completion of this course. J3111 Spanish II Native Speakers Credit: 1 Successful completion of Spanish II NS will result in retroactive Spanish I credit. This course offers advanced understanding of the Spanish language and exposure to the culture of the Spanish-speaking world. The basic skills of reading, writing, speaking, listening,

Related search queries